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Spider Identification Photos                

More Photos:   SPIDERS ONLY    #1 to #100,      #101 to 200 ,      #201 to 300,         #301 to 400,   
 
#401 to 500      #501 to 600        601 to 700        #701 to 800       #801 to 900       #901 to 1000        
   
1001 to 1100    #1101 to
1200     1201 to 1300     1301 to 1400    1401 to 1500      1501 to 1600      
  
1601 to1700      1701 to 1800      1801 to 1900        1901 to 2000        2001 to 2100       2101 to 2200    
 
2201 to 2400     2401 to 2600     2601 to 2800      2801 to 3100          3101 to 3300    3301 to 3600 
3601 to 3900
    3901 to 4100    4101 to 4300   4301 to 4500  4501 to 4700   4701 to 4900          
4901 to most recent  

 

 

The photos below have been copied from "What is this pest" pages.
This  page will be continuously revised.  As time permits we will add more.
Ant Mimic Spider    Cellar Spider     Cobweb Spiders       Crab Spiders     
Giant House spider       Giant Crab Spiders        Hobo Spiders
Fishing Spiders          Funnel Web        Jumping Spiders         Orb Weaving Spiders  
  Sac Spiders        Wolf Spiders       
    

Only high quality spider photos will be published if they are not similar to an existing photo. 

 

 

 

 

Click photos below to enlarge

Ant Mimic Spider                            Click photos to enlarge

1340  This appears to be a red-spotted antmimic spider (Castianeira descripta; Aranae:Corrinidae); sometimes known as a velvet ant mimic spider - see http://canadianarachnology.dyndns.org/data/canada_spiders/images/habitus/Castianeira_descripta.jpg  for an image. They are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Cellar Spider                                                       

4017 This is a cellar spider (family Pholcidae). Although it looks like a Holocnemus species (see http://tinyurl.com/caemjyb for an example), I can find no records of this genus from Ontario. These spiders are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Cobweb Spiders                            Click photos to enlarge

1091 This could be Enoplognatha ovata, a highly variable species in the family Theridiidae (cobweb spiders). See http://st.blog.cz/f/foto.blog.cz/obrazky/101589.jpg and http://www.ulg.ac.be/museezoo/ara/agrandi/images/45.jpg for images. It is not dangerous to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1146. This spider is in the family Theridiidae (cobweb/comb-footed spiders); likely in the genus Latrodectus, such as the western black widow (L. hesperus; see http://www.royalalbertamuseum.ca/natural/insects/bugsfaq/pics/blackwid.jpg ). False black widow/cupboard spiders in the genus Steatoda are similar in overall appearance, but females in this genus usually have a prominent pale transverse band near the front of the abdomen, and no such marking is visible in the photo. Bites from Steatoda can be painful, and bites from at least one species in this genus (S. grossa in Australia) may require medical attention. As a small child, I received a very painful bite from one of these spiders (likely S. borealis) that left a lasting impression. It was a long time before I picked up another spider! Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
 

Crab Spiders                                    Click photos to enlarge

1015  This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae); specifically, the goldenrod crab spider, Misumena vatia - see http://www.zoo.org/educate/fact_sheets/spiders/crab.html). These are ambush hunters that do not spin a capture web. Usually, they are found on flowers that more or less match their own color, which they can change to some degree. They are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae); it resembles Misumessus oblongus – see http://tinyurl.com/93ouk69 for an image. All crab spiders are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Fishing Spiders                               Click photos to enlarge

4424 These are two different examples of fishing/nursery web spiders in the family Pisauridae. The one on the left is Pisaurina mira (see http://tinyurl.com/kuojwjx) and the one on the right is Dolemedes tenebrosus, known as the dark fishing spider (see http://www.spiders.us/guide/species/dolomedes-tenebrosus/) for an image.Large specimens can deliver a painful (but not dangerous) bite if mishandled. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1388  This is indeed a fishing spider (family Pisauridae) in the genus Dolomedes; see http://canadianarachnology.dyndns.org/data/spiders/19664. They will wander some distance from water in search for prey, so it may not have needed to ‘hitchhike.’ See no. 1386 for a different example of this family. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1389   I live in Chelsea, QC and found this spider on my daughter's stroller.  I was just wondering if anyone knows what it is and if it might be harmful.  It is about 3 inches in diameter.  Leah
Like no. 1388, this is another fishing spider (family Pisauridae) in the genus Dolomedes. It is harmless to humans, although a specimen as large as this one could deliver a painful bite if mishandled. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1364  Hello, I noticed a frighteningly large spider outside my home in Athens, Ohio and photographed it.  The spider appeared, night after night, for several weeks in the same spot on a cinder block wall.  It disappeared for a few days and then reappeared on my porch right in front of my door.  This is the largest spider I have ever seen other than those in the Tarantula family.  I believe it to be a wolf spider, but I am certainly no expert.  I tossed the only thing I had on me, a cigarette butt, next to it to give a representation of the spider’s size.  The cigarette butt measures roughly 1.1 inches in length, so obviously this is a large specimen.  It appears to be pregnant- can this be?  Hope you enjoy the photo.  Ian
This could be a fishing/dock/nursery web spider (family Pisauridae). Closely related to wolf spiders (family Lycosidae), they differ in their eye arrangement and in how females carry their egg sac. Nursery web spiders carry their egg with their chelicerae (‘fangs’) - see http://bio-ditrl.sunsite.ualberta.ca/detail/?P_MNO=5143 whereas wolf spiders carry theirs attached to their spinnerets at the end of their abdomen - see http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74/image/31961757.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
 

Funnel Web Spiders                     Click photos to enlarge           

Funnel web grass spider1497 Found this big ugly guy sitting in my tub.  He was very quick!  Just wondering what he is.  Shawn.
This appears to be a male spider in the family Agelenidae (funnel web/grass spiders), likely in the genus Tegenaria (see http://www.washington.edu/burkemuseum/spidermyth/images/gigantea.jpg  for an image). Males in this family often wander quite some distance from their web, and then come to human attention when their wandering results in their accidental entrapment in tubs and the like. In spite of their appearance, they should pose no threat to human health. One species in this genus, the so-called ‘hobo spider’ (Tegenaria agrestis), has been implicated in cases of slow-healing ulcers (necrotic arachnidism) following a bite, but some controversy still exists on this subject. See http://www.xs4all.nl/~ednieuw/Spiders/Agelenidae/Agelenidae.htm for much more information on this group of spiders. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist, Sinks Grove, WV.

 

  1116  This is a male spider in the family Agelenidae (funnel web/grass spiders); likely in the genus Tegenaria. The males often wander far from any web in search of mates. See no. 1069 for another example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
1069  This appears to be a male funnel-web or grass spider (family Agelenidae); note the prominent spinnerets. The males often are found wandering about away from any web in search of potential mates. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1065  Although the visible spinnerets would seem to place this spider in the family Agelenidae (grass/funnel-web spiders), the shape of the abdomen is more typical of a wolf spider (family Lycosidae), and the protruding spinnerets could be an artifact of swelling subsequent to immersion in water. Unfortunately, one defining character of wolf spiders, namely the enlarged posterior median pair of eyes, cannot be seen in this image. In either case, these spiders generally are considered harmless to humans, although a specimen as large as this one could deliver a painful bite if mishandled. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
 

Giant House Spider                    Click photos to enlarge

1060  I live in South Eastern Alberta. I have several of these spiders in my home. They always seem to come around in mid - August. I would really like to know what this is because I have two small children. I would like to know if they are dangerous. This is a smaller version(size of a quarter) of what I had in my kitchen sink yesterday. It was the size of a loonie. And they move VERY fast. I am not a fan of spiders and these are making me very uncomfortable because of their size. Can somebody help identify it for me? Thanks!
This appears to be a male of the species Tegenaria Gigantea, AKA the Barn Spider or Giant House Spider.
Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tegenaria_duellica . It is large, fast, and scary looking, but harmless. The males are seen far more often than the females, as the females tend to stay in nests of silk under objects outside, and the males wander about looking for them. The large 'fist' shaped appendages in front of its front legs are its pedipalps, the spider's version of the penis. It is a close relative of the far more rare Tegenaria Agrestis, AKA the Hobo Spider.  Scott S.
 

Giant Crab Spiders                   Click photos to enlarge

1140. This is a giant crab spider (family Sparassidae; formerly Heteropodidae), likely in the genus Olios. Also known as huntsman spiders, they are harmless to humans, but large specimens reportedly can deliver a painful bite if mishandled.. See http://www.ag.arizona.edu/urbanipm/spiders/giantcrabspiders.html  for more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4025 This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae); it resembles Misumessus oblongus – see http://tinyurl.com/93ouk69 for an image. All crab spiders are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Hobo Spider                                              

This spider appears to be in the genus Tegenaria, which includes the hobo spider. Positive identification can be quite difficult without resorting to microscopic examination of some body parts. See http://tinyurl.com/cmphed for detailed information on this subject. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Jumping Spiders                         Click photos to enlarge

4624  Hi i live in Westbank British Columbia in Canada i took thos photo on my deck today. I have no idea what it is. Thanks.
This is a jumping spider (family Salticidae) in the genus Phidippus; most likely Phidippus johnsoni - see
http://tinyurl.com/kenzopc for an image and more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1501   I have checked many identification pages to no avail. This was crawling on our ceiling in St. Catharines, Ontario house on September 22. I believe it bit my daughter's arm. She's OK but it swelled quite a bit and she said it hurt and was itchy.  Lynette.
 This is a jumping spider (family Salticidae); they are active hunters, having excellent eyesight for spiders
(see
http://tolweb.org/accessory/Jumping_Spider_Vision?acc_id=1946  for details). Larger specimens are capable of a painful bite if mishandled, but none are considered dangerous to humans. However, just as with bee stings, some individuals may be more sensitive to the venom than others.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1395. This large spider measured around 1" long.  We live in Northeast Washington below the Canadian border.  The staples next to the spider measure 1/4".  We have never seen a spider like this one in 18 years. Note the hairs on it's legs.  Thank you,  Ellen
This appears to be a female red-backed jumping spider (Phidippus johnsoni), one of the largest members of its family (Salticidae) in North America (see http://spiderpharm.com/venoms/spp/spi/salticidae/images/phidippus_johnsoni_pop258.JPG  for an image). Basically harmless to humans, specimens this large are capable of delivering a painful bite if mishandled.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4506  Hi there, my name is Monica. This photo was taken August 15, 2013. I live in white rock, BC Canada. I have quite a fear of spiders so it was a feat to take the photo a few inches away. It got wound up in my laundry and travelled up to my room. I would love to know about it. Thank you.
This is a jumping spider (family Salticidae) in the genus Phidippus; most likely Phidippus johnsoni - see
http://tinyurl.com/kenzopc for links to images and additional information on this species. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
 

Orb-weaving spiders                   Click photos to enlarge

4024  This spider is Argiope trifasciata, a harmless orb weaver known as the banded garden spider – see http://tinyurl.com/8sq4a9g for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4995 Every spring to fall we have several of these large spiders outside our living room windows in Kingston, Ontario. This fellow's body looked to be about 1 to 1-1/2 inches in length. These spiders show up on their web in the evening, and I presume retreat to the soffit area during the day. The shield-shaped pattern on the back is something I notice only when taking the photo using my camera's flash.  Thanks!  Sharon
This is an orb-weaving spider in the genus Larinioides, likely L. sclopetarius  (this species occurs on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean); see http://tinyurl.com/36rmrb2 for an image. All orb weavers are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
This is an orb weaving spider in the family Araneidae; possibly a Neoscona sp. All orb weavers are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
This is an orb weaving spider in the family Araneidae; it looks like an Araneus sp. All orb weaving spiders are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1125 These an orb-weaving spiders (family Araneidae); this is a very large and widely distributed family, with all species harmless to humans. There are commonly seen throughout North America in September and October.  If you scroll through the pages here, you will see many other examples.
Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1983  I found the following spider on 9/8/08 in by backyard in Wheatfiled, New York. I believe it is an orb weaving spider but I am not sure. Can you confirm this? The white bulbous part of the body is Slightly smaller than a dime. Feel free to use it on your website. Thanks!  Joseph.
This is indeed an orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae); likely in the genus Araneus - see http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74/image/34080637 for an example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1486  Found Four of these spiders by the side of my house. There was a web connected between my house and our neighbors house. They ranged in size from a nickel to bigger than a quarter but not as big as a fifty cent piece. I caught two of them in a container and the bigger one killed the smaller one. I live in Shoreview, MN.  Aaron
These are orb-weaving spiders (family Araneidae); possibly in the genus Neoscona - see http://www.samford.edu/schools/artsci/biology/invert04f/photos/Arabesque-Orbweaver--Neosco.jpg  and http://www.tenczar.net/midwest/Araneidae/araneid1-1.jpg  for images. Several species of these spiders occur in Minnesota; all are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
cat-face spiderorb-weaving spider1509  Here's two views of my orb weaver. She/he is somewhat different from those I've been looking at on your wonderful website. This one's shell is about the size of a dime. I found him/her on our sandblasted pine front door late in September 2007 south of Tijeras, NM. By the way, I want to tell you how much I appreciate the pest identification information on your wonderful website. Thank you, Merle and Nancy Elson
As you likely already knew, this is an orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae). Specifically, it appears to be Araneus gemmoides, sometimes known as the cat-face spider - see http://www.colostate.edu/Dept/CoopExt/4dmg/images/catFace6.jpg. It is harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1505  I live outside of Halifax, NS and have found this spider on my deck for the past two days. I was hoping someone could help me to identify it. I was wondering if it's a wolf spider...Steve Prosser
This is an orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae) that somehow has wandered away from its web. See nos.1494 and 1495 for other examples. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
This is an orb-weaving spider (family (Araneidae); possibly the so-called cat-face spider, Araneus gemmoides - see 
  Orb weaving spiders.
Orb weaving spiders.
 

Sac Spiders                            Click photos to enlarge

1110  Please identify.  This small spider (<1cm) came in a plastic container of small tomatoes. Became active when moved from fridge to counter top. Thanks,  Dr Patrick  M., McMaster University
 
  This could be an immature sac spider (family Clubionidae; see http://www.insectimages.org/images/384x256/1252101.jpg for an image). Some sac spiders have been implicated in causing necrotic, slow-healing bites.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
 

Widow Spiders                             Click photos to enlarge

1362  I.D. my spider please.  Gabrielle
This appears to be a male widow spider (Latrodectus spp.); note the enlarged pedipalps and the ventral ‘hourglass’marking. Male widow spiders generally are considered harmless to humans (they are capable of biting, but both their fangs and venom glands are much smaller than those of female widow spiders).  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
 

Wolf Spiders                                 Click photos to enlarge

1956  Hi,  I found this big spider in my kitty's litterbox, and wonder if he is harmful to me or kitty.  I live in a rural area of southern Illinois, and carried the box WAY into the backyard and let this guy (girl?) out, so he could live in the barn.  I looked all over your site and could not find similar - although some of the ones you ID'd as wolf spiders or fishing spiders may be close...  Thanks!  Cara
This is a wolf spider (family Lycosidae), likely a so-called ‘rabid wolf spider,’ see http://homepage.mac.com/eceisner/Spiders/rabidwolfm.jpg They are harmless to humans, but large specimens can give a painful nip if mishandled. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4979  I have seen a number of these spiders in our garden near Almonte in Ontario. I have never seen them in the house but they seem to live a good life in the garden which is lightly wooded with a lot of vegetation. This photo was taken on May 5th on a dry sunny evening. The spider has a body that is approximately 15mm long.  Alun
This is a wolf spider (family Lycosidae); they have very good eyesight, and actively hunt down their prey. They are not dangerous to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1068  I suspect that this could be a male wolf spider (family Lycosidae; harmless to humans), but I cannot be certain. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1035   This appears to be a female wolf spider (family Lycosidae), but it would be nice to see a frontal view to be certain (the eye placement pattern is characteristic). Female wolf spiders often leave silk ‘draglines’ as they move about, and some also may construct silken retreats, but these usually are at or below ground level. They do not construct nests as such, but females carry their egg sac about with them until the spiderlings emerge. In spite of their appearance, they are harmless to humans; large specimens can deliver a painful bite if mishandled. Some funnel web spiders (family Agelenidae) can reach the size of your specimen, but the females have long spinnerettes at the end of their abdomen that appear to be lacking on yours.
Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1150.  This appears to be a large wolf spider (family Lycosidae). About the only other spiders of that size and general appearance in your area are the fishing/dock/nursery-web spiders in the family Pisauridae, but their eyes are less prominent, and their legs tend to be longer in relation to their body size. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
1345   This spider bit my wife this morning in the basement of our house in Pickering Ont.(down near Lake Ontario). Could you please help identifying it and should we worry?   Thank you in advance.  Rick Proctor
This could be a female wolf spider (family Lycosidae; note lack of visible spinnerettes and reflection of light from large eyes). They often are found indoors, and although larger specimens (such as this one) can deliver a painful bite if mishandled, they are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
Male rabid wolf spider doing courtship dance..
 
http://www.coopext.colostate.edu/4dmg/Pests/catspid.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orb_Weaver

 

 

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Some Comments
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This  site is fascinating! We just finished watching the new David Attenborough series on "Life in the Undergrowth". These creatures you are identifying are very important to life on the planet and I am very happy to have discovered your site after watching the series! Spellbinding! thank you.... Beth

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I'd like to add my sincere thanks to everyone responsible for this very informative web site, especially Ed Saugstad.  Publishing thousands of pest photos and identifying them must have taken many hours. 
I recommend this site to all my students as a reliable learning resource.  Charles McD.   Toronto.

   
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Congratulations for having received question #1000, and I'd also like to join the previous readers in thanking Ed Saugstad for his conscientious work of providing great answers to all questions; I also like this site a lot, I even added it to my browser's toolbar! Best regards, -Peter (Canton, MI)


This is a wonderful web-site! I learn something every time I visit, and have even had a couple of our own pests identified by your resident experts (including the weevil, #989 which is presently visiting our home, in northern Alberta) :)
    What I really want is to send a big thank-you to Ed Saugstad for the frequent responses and very helpful information, including web-links, for the many "bugs" that appear on these pages. He clearly loves what he is doing, and we are all beneficiaries of his beneficence.  Thank you, Ed!    
Ted Drouin,  retired biologist (not entomologist, though)


 
Thanks to Ted Drouin and others for the kind words - this actually is fun, and teaches me how little I really know! 
 
Ed Saugstad
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I do some photography of various critters found around my house (central Okanagan, BC) as well as exotics from private collections.  Often I have pictures I cannot complete as I have no name.  Your site helps me find these names.  Keep up the good work.
 
John Whittall           http://www.members.shaw.ca/jbc100/

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The pest photos are super helpful.  This is a very useful identification tool.  congratulations on a great website.  Paulina

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