Canadian Pest Control for all provinces: British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick. Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland  
How to control, get rid of,  eliminate, kill, exterminate, eradicate or manage bed bugs, sow bugs, spiders, wasps, ants, rats, mice and other  pests. Bug identification.

    
         
A close look at pests.
        A close look at pests


PEST CONTROL CANADA

 Pest Information & Control Solutions


                           Pest professionals directory

Directory of Pest Professionals 

 

www.PestControlCanada.com

 

Smart advertisers put their money where their mouse is.                                                 Contact us        Privacy policy        Disclaimer notice    

 

Home Page

Send us your photos for identification

 What is this pest?
Click to enlarge

4000+ Photo I.D.'s
Visit the
pest photo identification pages.
 


Q & A
Ask the experts.
Recent pest questions

employment openings

 Classified Employment  Ads.
 
For Canadian pest management businesses and job seekers

How to Choose a professional

Find a local professional 

Aassociations.
Canada:  CPMA
B.C.:
  SPMA-BC 
Ontario 
SPMAO
Quebec  
AQGP
International :
NPMA
Ants
Bed Bugs
Bird Control
Controlling pests
Employment ads: Pest Control
Insects
Integrated Pest Management.
Mold
Organic Pest Solutions
Other Pests
Pesticides
Types of pesticides

Pest control supplies
for consumers

for professionals

for bed bugs

Rodents
Spiders
Wasp Traps

West Nile Virus

Web site directory for professionals
Wildlife Control

 

Please visit our sponsor's web pages:

5 Star Cain Pest Control     Toronto

AAA-Quest Pest Management  Toronto

ABC Pest Management
Vancouver

Aero Bird Control
Vancouver

Braemar Pest Control
Atlantic Canada

Cal-Rid Exterminators Calgary

Care Pest & Wildlife Control  - Vancouver

Cameron Groupe
Quebec

Central Extermination
Montreal

Cranbrook Pest Control
East/West Kootenays, BC

Debbie Expert
Montreal

Ecopest  Edmonton

Environmental Pest Control
Southern Ontario

Holey-Moley Mole Control Vancouver

Environmental Services Group Inc.

Integrated Pest
Supplies Ltd.
 Vancouver

Kania traps info
 National

Nimby Pest Management
Southern Ontario

The Pest Detective
Greater Vancouver

Professional Ecological Services Victoria


P.C.S. Gulf Islands
Gulf Islands

 

If you like this web site please tell others about it.

Pest Identification Photos (Most recent submissions) What is this pest? 

More Photos:   SPIDERS ONLY    #1 to #100,      #101 to 200 ,      #201 to 300,         #301 to 400,   
  #401 to 500      #501 to 600        601 to 700        #701 to 800       #801 to 900       #901 to 1000        
   1001 to 1100    #1101 to
1200     1201 to 1300     1301 to 1400    1401 to 1500      1501 to 1600      
   1601 to1700      1701 to 1800      1801 to 1900        1901 to 2000        2001 to 2100       2101 to 2200    
  2201 to 2400     2401 to 2600     2601 to 2800      2801 to 3100          3101 to 3300    3301 to 3600 
3601 to 3900
    3901 to 4100    4101 to 4300   4301 to 4500  4501 to 4700   4701 to most recent  

 

This space reserved for
your pest photo

What is this pest?
 Submit photos of any pest you would like identified.  Hopefully one of our visitors will be able to identify them.  
 
How to send your photos.

The pictures below have been submitted by visitors.  If you can identify them you are invited to send us your answers. Your description  is also welcome.  Please Include the picture number in your answers.  

See Disclaimer Notice 

 


Need professional help?
Let your mouse do the
walking through our

Directory of Pest Professionals

 


This prime space
is available
for your ad.


It must work.  You just read this message!

Contact:  WEBMANAGER 

 

 

 

 

The pest management industry offers
rewarding careers.

See the opportunities available on our
classified ads page.

 

 

 

A little background on a volunteer expert respondent:
Ed Saugstad. 
B.S. in Entomology - NDSU, 1963.  M.S. in Entomology - Purdue University, 1967
A life-long interest in natural history. Formally trained in entomology, he also has a personal interest in herpetology and has read widely in many biological fields. 21 years in the U.S. Army as a medical entomologist; duties varied from surveillance of pest populations (including mosquitoes, cockroaches, ticks, and stored products pests) to conducting research on mosquito-virus ecological relationships and mosquito faunal studies. Ten years as a civilian analyst for the Department of Defense, primarily on distribution of vector-borne diseases worldwide.

 He is a member of Entomological Society of America, Society for Vector Ecology & National Speleological Society.

Publications
American Journal of Public Health, Contributions of the American Entomological Institute, Japanese Journal of Sanitary Zoology, Journal of Economic Entomology, Mosquito News, and Mosquito Systematics.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Pest page index

Ants
Ant nest photos 
   
Ask the experts
,  
Bats

Bedbugs
Bees

Birds
,  
Box Elder Bugs
Carpenter Ants

Canadian Pest Management Association,
   
Carpenter ant photos,

Choosing a profesional.
Cockroaches, 
Controlling pests

Finding a Pro,
  
Fleas

Flies
Getting rid of Carpenter ants 
Hantavirus,
   
Home page

Insects

I.P.M. 

Mice

Moles

Moths,
  , 
Other pests

Powder post beetles,
Raccoons
 Rats

 Real Estate & Pests
,
Rodents, 
Snakes

Spiders,
 
Spider Identification photos
SPMA of BC
,  
Sow Bugs

Supplies for pest control
Termites, 
Wasps
,  
Wildlife pests
 

 


Serving Greater Toronto Area
& Neighbouring Region
Bedbug

 

 

 

At QPM, we have highest success rate of complete elimination of bed bugs with one treatment alone. The treatment includes a thorough inspection of the property before a comprehensive application process. We are one of the few service providers who are confident to provide a warranty that these pests would be gone for good. For a no-obligation quote call us anytime.

24 Hrs./Day
416-321-5060
http://www.qpm.ca/

 


 

 


NOT IN  MY  BACK  YARD”
Wildlife & Pest management

Nimby Wildlife and
Pest Management

Commercial—Industrial—Residential

Professional pest control
 
MISSISSAUGA—BRAMPTON—OAKVILLE—MILTON
HAMILTON - BURLINGTON & ALL SURROUNDING COMMUNITIES
Contact us now
Phone: 905-799-0075,  
Toll Free:
1-888-681-6266
info@nimby.ca
 – MOE -LICENSED — BONDED  –INSURED  
   http://www.nimby.ca/.htm

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Smart advertisers put
their money where
their mouse is.


 

Need professional help?
Let your mouse do the
walking through our

Directory of Pest Professionals


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Need professional help?
Let your mouse do the
walking through our

Directory of Pest Professionals

 

 

 

 

Please bookmark this page, come back soon and tell your friends about it.  

Click on the photos to enlarge.  They are usually much clearer.

2600  I live in an 2nd story apartment in Dallas, TX with one of those outdoor patio closets. Over the summer I had bought a 40 lb bag of wild bird seed and put it in there on top off and in front of all of my Christmas decorations, including the brand new unopened tree we bought last year after Christmas. I went to go grab our Christmas wrapping paper out of the patio closet, and there they were. Our wrapping paper box was up against the wild bird seed bag, and I noticed it had them all over the inside of the bag. They are in all the boxes in the closet, they were tan and clearish when I first found them, but now that it has been a couple weeks or so they are beginning to get darker and get larger. Think they might have been larvae that I found at first. Please help me identify and any suggestions on how to get rid of them would be great, I would love to at least be able to put our tree up this year. (These look like the same bug/insect that you have pictured in #339, biting louse, order Mallophaga, likely in the genus Tricholipeurus, which is specific for white-tailed deer.) Thanks. Tabitha
This is an insect in the order Psocoptera, family Liposcelidae, commonly known as a booklouse. Booklice are not true lice, but are harmless nuisances that feed primarily on mold spores or bits of organic detritus. See no. 2598 for another example, one with wings; and http://tinyurl.com/mvz4xf for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
Hello,
I just happened on your site looking to identify the insect I had found in my house (a dermestid beetle, as it turns out).  I was blown away by how many identifications Mr. Saugstad had provided.  What an excellent public service!  Thank you for hosting the pictures, and please thank Mr. Saugstad for his extremely helpful contributions.
Yours,
Ben Flanders,  Toronto, Ontario
Thank you Ben for your kind words. Yes Mr. Saugstad deserves a lot of credit for the effort he makes and the hours spent providing this valuable information.  We also appreciate his dedication and service to the internet community.
Larry Cross.  Webmanager.
2599  Many Tiny larvae bugs came out of crack in grout of tile around bathroom sink. We sprayed them w insect spray which temporarily killed them, then they returned a few weeks later and again. Are these drain fly larvae? Thank you!  Dorothy
These are much more serious than drain fly larvae; these are termites. You probably should arrange for a thorough inspection of your premises by a certified termite control company. You might try looking at http://www.termite.com/ for listings in your area.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2598  Hello, I only recently realized there are bugs on my bed room. The size is about from 0.3 to 1 mm in length. It is very active and jump about on the floor. I do not keep pet and do not think this is flea. I wonder where is the source and does it harmful to human being? I cleaned the entire room often. But within the next 2-3 days, the bugs would appear in quite a number again.  Any info would be appreciated. Thanks so much. Lee
This is an insect in the order Psocoptera. Commonly called booklice or barklice, they feed primarily on mold spores or bits of organic detritus. Occasionally, psocids can be pantry pests when stored cereal products become moldy. Other than that, they are completely harmless, but some people become alarmed when they appear in large numbers. See http://tinyurl.com/mvz4xf for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2597  Hello, I found this big guy just hanging out on my house in Hants County Nova Scotia in November and I am wondering if anybody can tell me what he is. He’s a big one!  Jodie
This spider is in the family Pisauridae (fishing/dock/.nursery web spiders); likely the dark fishing spider, Dolomedes tenebrosus - see http://tinyurl.com/ydtjaoc for an image and no. 2520 for another example. They are harmless to humans, although large specimens can deliver a painful bite if mishandled.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2596  We seem to have a bit of an infestation of this in our bedroom. It is clean – food free – and vacuumed every other day. Regardless, I have seen them mainly on the carpet, but a handful or so have made it into our bed. I cannot find the source, but I did find ONE of these dead on the windowsill. We seem to have adults and young – the biggest being approx 1mm. The smaller are a reddish brown, the larger a darker brown. Tammy Smith
These appear to be beetles in the family Anobiidae. Some of these can be pests, either through boring in wood or infesting a very wide variety of pantry products. Yours bear some resemblance to one known as the drugstore beetle (Stegobium paniceum) - see http://tinyurl.com/yaedpjx for an image.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2595  Hello! Please help ID these bugs found in my mother-in-law's apartment near Detroit Michigan. They seem to be coming from the woodwork in the walls. They also seem to like a wooden cabinet. They are also in the cupboards. They are about 4 mms long (a little less than 3/16"). They look black in the picture, but look very dark brown to me. Thanks!
The image is a bit unclear, but these could be grain beetles in the family Sylvanidae, such as the saw-toothed grain beetle, Oryzaephilus surinamensis - see http://tinyurl.com/yc6ay3h for an image. Beetles such as these can be pantry pests, feeding on a variety of grains and grain-based food products.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2594  Hi, This furry caterpillar was found in south west Ohio in late September.  I'd appreciate an identification. Thanks, Diana.
This caterpillar is in the family Arctiidae; it appears to be that of the agreeable tiger moth, Spilosoma congrua - see http://tinyurl.com/y9kkhql for an image. The intersegmental color can vary from white to orange.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2593  This thing was in our bed! We are in Toronto. There is nothing there for scale - I'd say it was maybe a little under 2 cm in length, but my memory/perception may be wrong. We only ever saw one.
This is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as the masked hunter (Reduvius personatus). See http://tinyurl.com/nwflhh for an image and nos. 2537 and 2422 for other examples.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2592  Hello, I live in a apt in Manhattan New York and lately I have been finding these bugs in my bathroom. I had my tiles re calked and that is when they showed up. They move pretty quick, but basically I can always catch them if I wanted. I hope you have seen one of these before as I can't seem to find a match anywhere else. They are lighter in color than the photo shows, a light grayish color. Thanks in advance, Shane
This is an immature sowbug, a terrestrial crustacean in the order Isopoda. They are for the most part harmless nuisance pests, scavengers on decomposing organic matter/detritus, but some occasionally can damage very tender vegetation. Their presence is indicative of abundant moisture/high humidity, as they breathe through gills that must be kept moist.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2591  This little white spider's body is 1/4" long from stem to stern. I don't see anything like it on the site and am curious to know its name. Frankie, Calgary, Alberta.
This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae) that appears to be starving. It might be Misumena vatia, known as the goldenrod crab spider - see http://tinyurl.com/yzz9kgw. It is unusual for spiders in having some ability to change its colour to match its background.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2590  Hi. I live in Vancouver BC Canada. I found this in our closet where we store blankets, pillows, shoes, books and some old clothing that had recently been brought up from our basement. Never seen one of these before, found it early December It's about half a centimeter in length. Any help would be appreciated. Cheers, Chris.
This looks like a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (hide/skin/carpet beetles), possibly in the genus Anthrenus, that has lost many of its setae (body hairs). See http://tinyurl.com/yey56z5 for an image and http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for a fact sheet with detailed control recommendations.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2589  Hello, Can anybody identify this larva? This was found in a box of washing powder in Finland. The product was manufacture in the UK . There are 4 live larva was found in pack on the 2/1Dec/09 and the pack was manufactured in the UK on the 22/July/09. This has a brown head and 6 legs (3 either side) at the front of a segmented body with 2 protrusions on the back end. I assume it had to have been an egg stage to why it is still alive in such a inhospitable environment. Denise.
This is a beetle larva, but it is difficult to exactly of what kind. About the only pest species that I am familiar with that has this general shape (including the terminal urogomphi), is one known as the cadelle (Tenebroides mauritanicus; Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), but their larvae are much paler - see http://tinyurl.com/y9tgqgh for an image. Yours might even be predatory rather than pestiferous in nature.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2588  Hi there, This bug was found in a suitcase that was stored in the closet of an old home (>50yrs) in Halifax NS. I've only found one of them but am quite curious to know what it is. To give an indication of size, the white piece of plastic in one of the photos is an insert from the collar of a dress shirt. The bug is about 1.5mm across the body. Thanks for the help! Craig
This is Mezium americanum, known as the American spider beetle - see http://tinyurl.com/njb9zb for an image. Spider beetles are in the family Anobiidae; subfamily Ptininae; they formerly were considered a separate family, Ptinidae. They will feed on a very wide variety of organic materials, and sometimes can become pantry pests - see http://tinyurl.com/mamup5 for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2587  Hello, Can you help to identify these insects?, I found them in a fly trap. Thanks, Lallini
The male moth in the left image appears to be in the family Geometridae (loopers, spanworms, etc.). If a specialist in the group is monitoring this forum, they may be able to pin a specific i.d. on it. The image of the wasp on the right is not sharp enough to be certain of an i.d.; it may be in the family Pompilidae (spider wasps) - see http://tinyurl.com/yf564gj for some examples.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2586  This insect was found in our living room on the carpet. Can you identify? I live in Chattaroy, WV.  Thank you, Phyllis
This appears to be a wasp in the family Braconidae; along with those in the family Ichneumonidae, they all are parasitic on other arthropods, primarily insects.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2585  I live on the coast in North Carolina, USA and found this spider creating a HUGE web from the top of my patio umbrella to the side of my house about fifteen feet away. Any information or an ID would be great! I am very interested! If you want/need more photos please let me know!
This is another orb weaving spider (family Araneidae); likely in the genus Neoscona, possibly Neoscona arabesca - see http://tinyurl.com/yjaws8w for an image. All orb weavers are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2584  Could you please tell me what kind of spider this is, and how long can I expect it to live? It has made a huge round web on the outside of my kitchen window and lives up in the corner. It has been there for several months. Just when I think it must have died in the cold, it goes for a walk! Thank you. E-J Sherrington, Montreal.
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae); likely in the genus Araneus, such as Araneus diadematus, a species with widespread distribution in Europe and North America - see http://tinyurl.com/4n7hfv for images and more information. There are several species in the genera Araneus and Neoscona with quite similar (often overlapping) colour patterns, thus making a specific determination from an image a bit uncertain.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2583  Hi, I think I know the answer to this question, but in a way I really don't want to know, my wife noticed this dead bug in our bed while she was making it in the morning. I'm afraid there was a blood splotch near it as well. Yick.So, is this a bedbug? We've never had any problems with this before, but I did stay at a hotel in Montreal 2.5 weeks ago. I'm wondering if that's where it came from. I have basically taken apart the bed and haven't seen anything else except what appear to be a couple dermestid or carpet beetle larvae (at first I thought they were bedbug nymphs, before finding your site). We are in Ottawa. We just moved into this house (about 100 yrsold) about 5 months ago. Thanks for the ID! Patrick
This is indeed a bug in the genus Cimex, and although it does appear to be a true bed bug (Cimex lectularius), there is a closely related species known as the bat bug (Cimex adjunctus) that can occur in your area, and that will feed on humans as well as on bats. However, the principal character used to differentiate them (fringe hairs on the pronotum - see
http://tinyurl.com/ygpks6s) cannot be seen on your specimen. See http://tinyurl.com/5l5y95 for a very detailed fact sheet on bed bugs.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2582  Friends of mine snapped this photo near Watson's, Ontario (Kawartha Lakes Region) during the summer. One individual identified it as Asian Longhorn, however they could have misidentified due to the colouring being off.
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), but not an Asian long-horned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) - see http://tinyurl.com/ykf8q3j. It might be a northeastern pine sawyer, Monochamus notatus - see http://tinyurl.com/yl6sp83 for an image.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2581  Last summer my daughter found this thing in her garage. They live in Trenton, Ontario. I've found a few similar bugs online but none have those pincer like front claws. Could any possibly identify it for us? Many thanks for any help at all. Kim
This is a pseudoscorpion, a small arachnid (related to spiders, ticks, scorpions, etc.); these are general predators on other small arthropods and completely harmless to humans. See http://tinyurl.com/36vv3q for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
 
Hi There, This is a pseudoscorpion (sometimes called a false scorpion or book scorpion). They are arachnids, not insects, and are harmless to humans. They prey on small larvae and insects so can be beneficial in the home. Dr Nigel Gericke, medical doctor, Cape Town, South Africa
2580  Hi there, I was hoping you could tell me what kind of spider this is? I know it is not a great picture. I found it in our home in my sons bedroom and I have seen more than one. I have 3 small children and I am worried about this being a poisonous spider. Thank- you so much for your help, C. Smith, South East Alberta
Number 2480 - This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae) in the genus Araneus; it might be either Araneus saevus (see http://tinyurl.com/yeabkoc) or Araneus gemmoides (see http://tinyurl.com/yzutzyr). The markings of these species can be quite variable, with a good deal of overlap.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2579  Hi, We're located in Melbourne, Australia so I know it's a fair way away from you guys but any help would be appreciated!
We have recently been finding these tiny bugs in our pantry. The first time we found them, we cleaned our pantry out, gotten rid of any open boxes of wheat, flour, grain and sugar products, sealed everything up and then 3 days later, noticed they appeared again. This time, we used barrier / surface insect spray in the pantry only to find them back again the next day. They seem to like cardboard as we found alot of them in the bottom of packaged products etc...They are approximately the size of a pen tip (.5mm?), they're tiny so you are unable to see much of them so we put one under a microscope.  They are sort of creamish light brown in colour. They don't jump at all, but they also move around a bit. We really want to be able to eradicate them as they're living in our food storage area and although we have cleaned it out twice now, and even used insecticide, they're still coming back and I have no idea where or how they're there. Our pantry is pretty well sealed up otherwise. Thanks, Natasha.
This appears to be a small insect in the order Psocoptera known as a booklouse (family Liposcelide). They are not true lice at and usually are considered nuisance pests. They feed primarily on mould spores and the like but they occasionally may feed on starchy materials such as those found in old bookbindings and wallpaper paste, or even some cereal products. Their presence usually is indicative of a humidity problem that encourages mould growth. See http://tinyurl.com/mvz4xf for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2578  This spider was hanging from a 20 foot overhang in front of the New Art Gallery of Ontario on Sunday November 22. It inched its way down to the sidewalk made contact with its legs and dangled. I touched it then it made its slow ascend back...it was about 6cm or more in length with legs and has two dimples on its body. Bruce
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae) in the genus Araneus. Although superficially resembling a marbled orb weaver, Araneus marmoreus (see http://tinyurl.com/ybclwsj), it also could be an orange colour morph of a different species - see http://tinyurl.com/yea37ur for an example.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2577  I live in Logan Lake British Columbia and while I was at work (N50 31.618 W120 51.791) I found this unusual bug on the back of my bosses truck. It does not appear to have a stinger nor any large mandibles and was approximately 5 to 7 centimeters in length. I have never seen anything quite like it and I was wondering if you knew what it was. Sorry I have no other photos of the bug. Sincerely, Carolyn
This is a clearwing moth (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae); possibly the fireweed clearwing, Albuna pyramidalis - see http://tinyurl.com/yan7rae for an image. Several species in this family, such as the squash vine borer and peach tree borer, are important pests, and many are excellent wasp mimics, often being called wasp or hornet moths. Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2576  Hi, These insects (I think that they’re moths) were found in a tub of pistachio kernels opened in Ireland (I have no information on the origin of the nuts). The question I have is if it is possible to say if this is a native species of moth or an exotic foreign one? Many thanks for all your help and expertise. Andrew (Galway, Ireland)
This appears to be an Indianmeal moth (Plodia interpunctella; Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), a cosmopolitan pantry pest. Its caterpillars will feed on a wide variety of dry food products, including grains, cereals, and dried fruit. See http://tinyurl.com/ac7aha for detailed information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2575  I found this spider outside my porch door , then a few days later it ended up in my bedroom. My home is over 160 years old I have seen more spiders here then i have ever had in my other house, they range in size and colour. The black spider was in my sink also I seen one in my basement.
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae); likely in the genus Araneus, possibly Araneus diadematus - see http://tinyurl.com/ybrlf5g. I hesitate to be certain, as the colour pattern of several species, including some in the closely related genus Neoscona, can be quite similar.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2574  Hello, We recently brought our Christmas tree (it's a Fraser fir) home from a farm in Maple Ridge, BC. Within a few hours, several of these bugs (see attached) began showing up on the tree skirt. They are definitely alive, although not very active...yet. They're probably harmless but are freaking us out all the same. What are they? Please help!
This is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the subfamily Entiminae (short-snouted/broad-nosed weevils); possibly in the genus Strophosoma - see http://tinyurl.com/yhpfnml for an example. These weevils can girdle stems of small trees, but should do no damage in your situation.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2573  I found a very few of these in my bathroom. They are about 1 mm long, This one is magnified 30 times with a pocket microscope. They move very slowly, almost imperceptibly. I would appreciate anything you can tell me.
This is a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae(hide/skin/carpet beetles), likely in the genus Anthrenus - see for an example. These larvae will feed on an extremely wide variety of organic materials, especially those containing animal protein (such as woolen fabrics, furs, feathers, hides, accumulations of dead insects, etc.). Control hinges on finding whatever they are feeding on and treating/discarding it. The adult beetles are pollen feeders and very good fliers.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2572  A Friend found this spider in his house in Calgary Alberta . Can you tell me what kind it is ?
This is a cobweb/comb-footed spider (family Theridiidae) in the genus Steatoda - see http://tinyurl.com/yfbbpp4 foe an example. Although related to the widow spiders (some are called ‘false black widows), their bite can be quite painful, but not dangerous.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2571  I was wondering if you could tell me what kind of bug this is? I live in Vancouver, B.C. and found a bunch of these bugs behind the kitchen sink on the counter top. When anything gets close to them, they jump an inch or two. Could you tell me if they cause any kind of problems with people with asthma. Thank-you
This is a springtail, a primitive arthropod in the order Collembola. Species such as this one are harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter/detritus that can become nuisance pests when they occur indoors. They require abundant moisture/high humidity in order to persist in a environment, so anything that you can do to eliminate/reduce unnecessary sources of moisture in and around your home will help control them. As for asthma, I have seen no evidence that springtails are a particular hazard in this regard.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2570  I found it in Nisku, mostly dead. Are front legs normally that close to the head?
This is a giant water bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Belostomatidae); the legs are in a normal position. They are general predators on other aquatic insects as well as on tadpoles and small minnows - see nos. 2506 and 2335 for other examples, and http://tinyurl.com/nrvpb for much more information. They are strong fliers that can be found quite some distance from any water source.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2569  Hi, I found this spider in my office and I trapped it. I have never seen a spider this big before. My office is next to the warehouse and I think it came out of one of our imported shipments. I am in Brampton, Ontario. Please let me know what you think. Thanks, Mike
It is difficult to say exactly what this male spider is; a possible suspect is funnel web spider (family Agelenidae) in the genus Tegenaria - see http://tinyurl.com/yzeegev for an example. This genus occurs on both sides of the Atlantic.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2568  Hi there we found thousands of these little ants in our lazy susan. dry area with boxed food. granola bars ice cream cones macaroni, almonds. I think they did most damage to the almonds. they are no larger than 2mm, I had a heck of a time trying to get a picture they are so small. please let us know what kind of ants they are and how we may get rid of them without contaminating our food. Paul
These are ants, and based on their very small size, could be either pharaoh ants (Monomorium pharaonis) or thief ants (Solenopsis molesta). See http://tinyurl.com/yzyeg3n and http://tinyurl.com/yzwkxkh for some management tips. As a rule, thief ants are more difficult to control than pharaoh ants.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2567  I am from Duncan on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. I found this insect crawling up my curtain in my 3rd floor apartment. It has wings, but it was crawling. I have never seen it before. Thank you if you can identify it.
This appears to be a western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae). A species that often comes indoors as weather cools in the autumn. See no. 2543 for another example.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV


 

2566  Hi, I recently discovered several of these god awful looking spiders in our little cabin in Sooke, BC. There was about 4 adults sized ones and several smaller ones. They had a very stiff sort of a web done out all along the four walls of the cabin. The web was only around 2" wide but as I said, it went all the way around the room and about 5-6"from the ceiling. Anybody have any ideas as to what it is?? Have found them in various other spots around the cabin as well. Thanx, T.
This appears to be a male hacklemesh weaver (family Amaurobiidae) in the genus Callobius; see http://tinyurl.com/y9p9t8r for an example. They reportedly can give one a painful bite, but are not considered dangerous.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2565  I live in Norfolk, VA. I found these larvae(?) in a jellied swath about 1" x 1/2" on the ceiling in my dining room. I wiped it off with a tissue, thinking it was dirt, but on closer inspection I see that it is some sort of insect (moth?) larvae. The first photo shows that they have 4-6 legs near the head. The second photo is a better shot of their body/head. Can someone please identify?
These appear to be newly hatched caterpillars. A female moth may have blundered indoors and laid her egg mass on the ceiling.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2564   Hi, Kindly help to identify these two insects that were collected in an insect trap inside a factory. This is in Sri Lanka. Thank you, Antonitta
The insect on the left is a fly in the family Syrphidae (hover/drone/flower flies); the larvae of many species are predaceous on other soft-bodied arthropods. I cannot be certain about the insect on the right, I can only guess that it might be a parasitic wasp in the family Braconidae or Ichneumonidae.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2563  Hello, I found these two similar bugs in my room, one near my closet and one near my room door. They are dead. I took some photos under a dissecting microscope. They're about 1 mm in real life, but zoomed in with the microscope. On their head regions, they have several fluffy looking spikes, and their back two legs (?) are very long, clear and appear intertwined together. Their head is curved inward, and their head-piece appears rather indistinct from the rest of their body. Their front two antennae or feet are much longer than any of their middle portion legs. I'm curious as to what these bugs are! They appear to have jumped and stuck to the insect trap I had inside my closet, since they're near the middle of the sticky trap and couldn't have just walked across the trap to get to the middle. Do you have any idea what kind of insect they may be? Thanks for your time.
This is a springtail, a primitive arthropod (authorities differ as to whether they are true insects) in the order Collembola. Most of these can jump, using a specialized mechanism under their abdomen. See http://tinyurl.com/yh9wgyw for detailed information. Although yours resembles some in the family Entomobryidae (see http://tinyurl.com/yen5cz3 for an example), the charcterers need to key it out cannot be seen.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2562  Hi, We are from Edmonton Alberta and discovered this bug crawling along the baseboard in our finished basement rumpus room. The area they appear to be in is near a fireplace. Thank you, Dave
This is a terrestrial crustacean in the order Isopoda; common names for this group include woodlice, sowbugs, pillbugs, and slaters. For the most part, they are harmless scavengers on organic detritus that may become nuisance pests when they wander indoors.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2561  Hi guys. I live in the Interior/Shuswap of BC. A couple months ago I was being bitten at night by what I think must have been a spider. Some of the bites oozed puss, most just very itchy for many days. Lots of skin had been removed during the feast. I found a spider shortly after, promptly squished it, and didn't have any issues afterwards. Now, I've found another and enclosed a pic. I've looked at pictures on your site and it looks like either a wolf or fishing spider. Perhaps you knowledgeable folk can nail it down for me. Much appreciated, Chris
Although I cannot see its eyes, this spider looks to me more like a fishing/dock spider (family Pisauridae) in the genus Dolomedes (see http://tinyurl.com/ydtjaoc for an example) than a wolf spider (family Lycosidae). Although large specimens in either family can deliver a painful (but not dangerous) bite, they are not aggressive and usually bite only if you pick on up carelessly. It is always dangerous to presume you know what bit you without actually seeing it bite you.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2560  Hi there. I was working in my parents house in southern Oregon and opened up the wall and part of the ceiling to find out what was causing the ceiling to drop so much. it turns out there was a nest back there. They ate the wood and built a very large nest. There were no live specimens nor bodies of dead ones. would you be able to tell me what it was that made this nest? I was thinking it was termites but I didn't think they would build something like there, because the wood was completely eaten away. I have even asked some fellow Carpenters and they had no idea. A few were thinking it was some kind of bee. Can anyone help me?
This could be ‘carton’ constructed by termites, but I have never seen anything exactly like this. You might want to have your premises inspected by a professional skilled in wood protection services - see http://tinyurl.com/yz3sm4x for a starting point.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV

Hi there, This is a picture of typical moisture ant damage. The genus name of this ant is Lassius spp. If you want to find them on the web look up their true common name which is Cornfield Ant. Simply, Cornfield Ant (moisture ants) feed off the molds, and fungal growth on moist starch based materials, which wood (especially sapwood) has a lot of. Hope this helps, just eliminate the moisture leak, have a carpenter repair the damaged wood and you’re good to go. Moisture ants rarely require the application of pesticides.   Steve Abramavage, Team Too Termite & Pest Control
2559  This bug and his friends are living in my bedroom,  I have not seen them anywhere else in my house. They reside behind the curtains or underneath blankets, rugs and pillows that are on the floor. They are not in the bed. They run very fast when disturbed. There seemed to be a stinky smell when I hit it.  I never see them running around - only when I disturb their hiding place. If I had to guess how many are in my room, I would say maybe 10 or 15. I live in Lake Elsinore which is in southern California. Can you tell me what these are and how to get rid of them? Thanks, Denise
 This is a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae). The vast majority of the members of this very large family are general predators on other small arthropods, and thus usually considered beneficial. They frequently find their way indoors during their searches for prey, and some species do indeed have a very characteristic odor.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2558  Hello I live in the UK. Found this larvae in my bath, it has come out of the extractor fan above the bath. when I removed the cover the duct was full of fluff and several of these little beasts, I have now cleaned it all out but wondered what these are can you help. Thanks Tommy
This appears to be a small caterpillar, likely a species that feeds on debris rather than on fresh vegetation, but the image is too indistinct to say much more other than it is very unlikely to be a species that would be a pest (such as clothes moths or meal moths).  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
 
2557 Hello, We live in an urban section of Toronto, Ontario. These critters showed up in our backyard last fall in large numbers. They are visible on our screen door and patio table, but mostly seem to be in the leaves on the ground. After raking up the fall leaves last year, I saw hundreds of them making their way along the inside and top of the yard waste bags. They came back again this fall – I was hoping that last year was just an anomaly but this seems not to be the case. They are quite small, with the body being about 1/8 of an inch. Thanks David
This appears to be a birch catkin bug, Kleidocerys resedae (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Lygaeidae) - see http://tinyurl.com/yggo9vb for an image. They do not appear to cause any serious damage (see http://tinyurl.com/ydum8u4 for details). Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2556  I have this insect coming into my house in Kings County Nova Scotia and I would like to know what kind of bug I am dealing with.
Thanks, Francine
This appears to be a western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae - see http://tinyurl.com/ygv628c). This insect frequently enters buildings in search of shelter during cool weather; if you scroll down through this page, you should see several other examples starting with no. 2534.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2555  Can you help… I have attached a picture of a “bug” that “bit or stung” my son’s top lip as he drank from a can of pop while outside… we live in Ontario Canada, just north of Toronto. The bug was about ½ in. long… looked like a tiny green iridescent wasp or ant like creature with wings (not furry) Thanks, Janet
This is a bee in the family Halictidae. Sometimes known as sweat bees, these are solitary bees that nest in burrows in the soil. They can indeed deliver a very painful sting for their small size!  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
 
2554  Hi, I am wondering if anyone can identify this moth? Found in south western Ohio, in late April. Thank you, Diana.
This moth is in the family Geometridae (larvae known as inchworms or measuring worms). There are several species having a similar wing pattern; I am not confident enough to put a specific name on this one.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2553  Around 1/8” long. These little buggers keep coming back in my mom’s pantry even after several treatments from professional exterminators. Any idea what they are? Thanks, Mike
This resembles a beetle in the family Anobiidae known as the drugstore beetle (Stegobium paniceum - see http://tinyurl.com/ygpnp8a). They will feed on an incredibly wide range of organic material, including cereal grains such as wheat, oats, corn, maize, barley, and sorghum as well as processed cereal products (such as cornmeal, flour, pasta, and wheat bran); pharmacy drugs, nuts, pepper and other spices, dry pet biscuits, birdseed, beans, and fish meal. They also may eat non food items such as books, taxidermy exhibits, wool, leather, and even rodent baits containing poison. This dietary regimen makes control difficult, as one has to locate and eliminate all sources of an infestation. Pesticides usually are a temporary control means at best; you should keep all pantry items in insect-proof containers or under refrigeration.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
 
Hi Mike, Looks like you are having problems with Cigarette Beetle ( could be Drugstore Beetle too). Have a local member of the ESA (Entomological Society of America) give you a proper Identification if your pest control company can’t because these two different beetles, have different favorite foods. You and or your pest control company hasn’t found the source of the infestation yet. All pantry products, spices, even inside unopened packages can harbor these infestations. Also, antique dolls, felt hats, mounted dead animal trophies, dry dog and cat food, milled grain products like flour and bisquick, dried fruit, nuts, bird seed, any old undisturbed pantry product should be viewed with suspicion. Needless to say, discard any products having a “web like” material in them as this is their fecal matter. Anything open that could have eggs laid in it should be exposed to heat above 130 degrees Fahrenheit for two hours, or freezing temperatures for at least 3 days to kill all stages of this insect as it goes from egg to larva to pupa to adult – the pic you posted. If you still have moderate to high activity of adults after this step, there are beetle traps that use oil and pheromones to attract the rest of the males to arrest further mating, and then only at this time, should a chemical application be done to get the rest of the larva and adults in the cracks and crevices.  Steve Abramavage, Team Too Termite & Pest Control
2552  I live east of Kemptville, Ontario and photographed this flying bug in my garage on Sat. Sep.19,2009. It is approximately 1.5 inches long. The orange dots behind its head are raised bumps. Not concerned, just interested in its identification. Thank you, Eric
This is a crane fly (Diptera: Tipulidae); this is a very large family with thousands of species. The orange objects are water mites (order Hydracarina); they may be either parasitic, feeding on the body fluids of their host, or phoretic, simply using the host insect as transportation.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
 
Hi Eric, You have a common Crane Fly with red mites on its back (thorax). Curiosity is a cool thing. Hope this answers your question.  Steve Abramavage, Team Too Termite & Pest Control
2551  My son found this spider in a large web ( 3ft x 2ft) stretched between our AC unit and a larger flower planter. We live in Toronto on the border with Markham in Ontario. Any ideas as to what type of spider it is? Thanks. Scott
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae); likely Araneus diadematus, a very widespread species that goes by a number of common names including cross spider and European garden spider - see http://tinyurl.com/4n7hfv for images and more information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2550  Hoping someone can identify this bug (Calgary, AB). They are pretty small, about 5mm long. We have lots of them flying around our front door in the evenings. They congregate around our front door, but not at other doors or windows on the house. We have two very large spruce trees in our front yard and  I have seen quite a few of the same bug flying around near the tree. Any feedback is appreciated. Thanks!
I cannot provide a specific i.d. here - about all I can say is that it most likely is in the family Tineidae or Gelechiidae. There are a great many of these tiny moths (microlepidoptera) that take a specialist to differentiate.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2549  Spider drama: We saw the smaller spider aggressively harassing the larger spider which mostly ignored the smaller one. They were just outside our back door in Oregon. Thanks, Jon
This is a male and female orb weaving spider (family Araneidae). The smaller male simply is trying to entice the larger female into mating without himself becoming a meal in the process.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2548  Hello, This lil' "bugger was caught after I felt a sharp prick, kind of like a mosquito, but sharper. It left a small, swollen bite mark, again.... kind of like a mosquito, except that it was far more sensitive to touch and was itchier. What is it? Thank you for this website! Anthony - Lethbridge,  Alberta.
This is a predatory bug known as a damsel bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Nabidae) - see http://tinyurl.com/yalxtov for an image of one in action. Like most such bugs, their saliva contains proteolytic enzymes that can cause considerable pain when the bug ‘bites.’ However, there are no lasting effects.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2547  Hello. I found this little beastie clinging to one of the rafters of my car-port over the driveway. I thought about catching it for a second (still a kid at heart :] ) but when I touched it, much to my surprise it gave a loud--and very recognizable--chirp in protest! Apparently these are the buggers we hear drowning out the crickets every night here in central Mass. I'm guessing it's a katydid, but I thought they tended to be much smaller. This one was about 2 inches long. If you could provide any more detailed information on this fellow, it would be appreciated. Bob H. Warren, MA
This appears to be a true katydid, Pterophylla camellifolia (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae) - see http://tinyurl.com/ygqtoos and http://tinyurl.com/yf8eg4q   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2546  Help! I found these buggies under my dog's bed. My worst fear is that they're bed bugs because I recently spent 3 nights in a (nice) hotel in San Francisco. I've heard that there have been some infestations even in better hotels. I've spread diatomaceous earth around her bedding. She hasn't been scratching herself, and I haven't found any bug dirt in her fur, Thank you for your help. Gretty
These are not bed bugs; the larger two insects are cockroaches, an introduced species (Phyllodromica trivittata) native to the Mediterranean region - see http://tinyurl.com/yh2as6k for images.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2544  On our window for a couple of weeks, does a nice job on crane flies. Should we have fear? <grin> Mark
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae) in the genus Araneus; likely Araneus diadematus, a widely distributed species known as the cross spider or European garden spider - see http://tinyurl.com/nbqo3k for more detailed information; all orb weavers are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2543  Hello, I live in Holland Landing, ON (20 miles north of Toronto). My one year old woodpile has been infected with something boring into the wood. Observations: 1. The odd hole 1/16" in diameter. 2. Mounds of very fine dust.  Sorry the pictures are not very clear, don't have a macro lens. Any idea what is causing the problem and how to eradicate it?Thanks in advance.
There are several species of small beetles that can cause such damage; the images provided are not clear enough to attempt specific identification. About the best you can do simply is burn the wood.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2542  Hello, Looking for some help identifying this creepy little bug. I have found a few of them on the wall in my bedroom, one on the wall in my ensuite bathroom and a few on the carpet near the walls in my bedroom and in the hallway. They are quite small... only about 1/2cm in length with lots of creepy little legs. Nobody in our home has experience any bites or anything like that I am just disturbed by their presence. Help please, Thanks! Langley, BC
This is a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (hide/skin/carpet beetles); likely in the genus Anthrenus - see http://tinyurl.com/yg7rxs5 for an image. These larvae will feed on a very wide range of organic materials, and can be serious household pests. See http://tinyurl.com/ygnxhbg for more information and control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2541  Greetings, These ‘beetles’ were found on the floor above the ceiling of an office building.  The folks who collected the bugs thought they might of gain access from the tar and gravel roof. Your thoughts would be appreciated. Scott, Red Deer, Alberta Canada.
 This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae); because it resembles Hylotrupes bajulus, a species known as the old house borer or European house borer (see http://tinyurl.com/yauhtwt for an image), you should check for oval emergence holes or other signs of damage to the timbers.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2540  Hello! I have an unidentified spider for you folks to ID. The photos were sent to me through a contact at work so I do not have alot of information for you. Spider was found indoors, and I think they said it moved fairly fast. As you can see, the spider is quite small as seen in the glass being held by someone. The people are curious to find out what it is and were not sure where to send the pics, so I am helping out.
Thanks! Lyndon
This is a jumping spider (family Salticidae); they sometimes wander indoors while in search of prey.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
2539  There were hundreds of these beetles all over the bathroom walls, floors and under tub.  They are black and very tiny, this photo was magnified.  They also have wings under the shell.  We have a clematis outside the window.  The bugs have been showing up for years this year was the worst.  Would like to know what they are and how to get rid of them.  Thanks, Don. Salt Spring Island, BC
These beetles appear to be in the family Anobiidae, bearing some resemblance to a cosmopolitan pest species known as the drugstore beetle (Stegobium paniceum) - see http://tinyurl.com/yj2vmz7 for an image. You may want to inspect all dry stored food products in your house for signs of infestation. However, as some other species in this family can be wood-boring pests, you also may want to look for emergence holes in unpainted wood - see http://tinyurl.com/ydorhe4 for an example. If you find evidence of such damage, professional control may be necessary.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2538  Hi, this spider is current residing across my front porch. Can you tell me what kind it is? I live in Kennesaw, GA. Thank you! RWC
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae), likely in the genus Araneus. There are several species that can have a color pattern resembling yours, so I hesitate to put a specific name on this one.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2537  Hello, I have found this strange bug inside my home. I live in Laval, Québec Canada. What strikes me as odd was the unusual movement of the bug (like a mixed of a frog and a crab movement). The legs in the back are very huge and the texture of the bug is quite peculiar. I am very curious to know what is this bug, Can you help me? Should I worry?  Thanks, Chantal
This is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as the masked hunter (Reduvius personatus) - see http://tinyurl.com/nwflhh for an image. Thet are general predators on other small arthropods, and can deliver a very painful bite if mishandled. See no. 2422 for another example.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2536  For the last couple of weeks I have been finding these flying beetles in our older home in Edmonton. Not many—maybe three or four a day, alive and dead, and in various rooms. They are between 5 and 10 mm long in the body (you can see relative to a penny in the image), with longish antennae, oval bodies, and orangey-red markings—most notably the V on the back. Can you tell me what they are, and whether I have any reason to be worried about their presence? Thank you, Cressida
This is not a beetle, but a bug - a boxelder bug to be exact. It appears to be an eastern boxelder bug, Boisea trivittata (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Rhopalidae) - see http://tinyurl.com/5haez8 for images and detailed information. They primarily are nuisance pests that do little real damage.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2535  I have no idea what this is. I like in Santa Cruz, CA. It is about an inch and half long, though it is the largest I've seen. It looks like maybe either a bee of some sort or an ant. This one has been in that location for two days at least. I usually find them while digging in my garden, thus the first time I saw them was in May. I have been unable to find any pictures or descriptions of this sort of insect before. Thanks, Mark
This is a relative of grasshoppers and crickets known as a Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae; Stenopelmatus sp.) - see http://tinyurl.com/5qrdrk. They burrow into the soil where they feed primarily on roots and tubers. They also may feed on dead insects and even may be predatory at times.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2534  It is winged one shot is in retracted one is wing displayed Abbotsford British Columbia Canada 49 n lat 123 w long. I have seen bigger ones than this around the house. There is some dust on this insect especially underside and bit on the wings displayed shot near the head. Can you ID? Thanks Greg
This is a leaf-footed bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae); it appears to be a western conifer seed bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis) - see http://tinyurl.com/yfgs49v for an image and no. 2499 for another example. These bugs frequently come indoors during cool weather to seek shelter, but do no damage there.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2533  Hello Ed & gang; We live in an urban section of Toronto, Ontario. These critters showed up in our backyard last fall in large numbers. They are visible on our screen door and patio table, but mostly seem to be in the leaves on the ground. After raking up the fall leaves last year, I saw hundreds of them making their way along the inside and top of the yard waste bags. They came back again this fall, they are quite small, with the body being about 1/8 of an inch.  Thanks!
Unfortunately, the image is not clear enough for me to tell what it is exactly; it appears to be a true bug of some kind. Can you see if you get another image in better focus?  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2532  I've been trying o figure out what sort of pest this is it only seems to be attacking the nectarine tree and am unsure what to use to combat it any help would be greatly appreciated I also live in Victoria, Australia. if that helps thanks
This is a larva of a lady bird beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellide). It likely was looking for aphids or other soft bodied insects to devour; it is not a plant pest of any kind.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2531  This is a fantastic website. I'm in Minnesota...  A close friend found she has bed bugs. Searching high and low, I found no tracks or bugs in the bed, bed frame, box spring, night tables.... but I found several of these in the floor board. Could this be the dreaded bed bug?Thanks!
Definitely not a bed bug; it might be a larva of a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae). If there is carpeting in the bedroom, you may want to inspect the edges of it for signs of more of these or evidence of chewing damage.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2530  I found several of these cocoons climbing up the wall inside my home. A little black head comes out occasionally. The cocoon seems to be anchored at the top, but the larva, along with it's cocoon crawls quite readily. The cocoon looks to be made of spider webs, or is always that color. It is about 1/4 inch long. Please tell me if I need to be concerned. Thank you. Linda, Campbell River, British Columbia
This appears to be a household casebearer, a.k.a.’plaster bagworm’ (Phereoeca sp.; Lepidoptera: Tineidae) - see http://tinyurl.com/yfg3sen for an image. They basically are nuisance pests, feeding primarily on old spider webs and the like. The larva of the case making clothes moth (Tinea pellionella ) is very similar in appearance, but the case usually has bits of the fabric being fed upon incorporated into it - see http://tinyurl.com/yhn6kfz for an example.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2529  While walking along a small lake outside of Kentville, NS, I noticed a very fat (perhaps the body was an inch in diameter??) and odd looking spider - it kept it's legs tucked in tight while it enjoyed a free trip from the leg of my blue jeans. The spider's legs were hairy, red and white striped and the body was light yellow with dark 'vein-like' lines and 4 black dots on it's back. When it was flicked off of my pant leg with a dried leaf, the spider left a silky trail as it walked along the rocks. I've never seen anything like it - please help identify!
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae); likely a marbled orb weaver, Araneus marmoreus. Like many others in this genus, it can be highly variable in appearance - see http://tinyurl.com/mmtyja for some examples.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2528  These bugs are in my house. We live in the United States in the state of Alabama. On my hardwood floors they make a popping or clicking noise. Two of the photos are to show the size of the bugs, one is next to a penny and the other on a piece of tape. They are extremely tiny. It is difficult to see the bug’s features with the naked eye. What I can see are 4 black spots on the back and at least one the head.
This is a click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae); likely in the genus Aeolus - see http://tinyurl.com/yjujhmo for an example. They are called click beetles because of the sound made when they release a mechanism on their thorax that causes them to spring into the air when placed on their back - see http://tinyurl.com/ygpv2k5   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 

2527  Took this in the upper corner of our front door, Burlington, Ontario, Canada. Looks like the Orb Spiders displayed on your site but I couldn't find any exact matches. Any ideas? Thanks for the input.
This is indeed an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae). However, there are several species in the genera Araneus (see http://tinyurl.com/ygqyvg9 for an example) and Neoscona (see http://tinyurl.com/yknuges for an example) whose colour patterns not only are quite similar, but may overlap, rendering field identification problematic. It is no wonder that you were unable to find an exact match!  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2526  Hello, We live in Toronto, ON and I found these bugs in our kitchen. The coin is a dime and the picture was taken with a 5x magnifying glass with the camera on macro. Could you please help us identify this bug? Thank you in advance!
This either is a saw-toothed or merchant grain beetle (Oryzaephilus sp.; Coleoptera: Sylvanidae). These can be pantry pests, feeding on a variety of stored food products, primarily those made of or containing grain of some kind. See http://tinyurl.com/yl2hx6l for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2525  Hi. I live in a small town surrounded by farm land. recently we have found these pesky bugs in our home. I have found pictures of them online but have yet to figure out what they are or where they come from or even more, how to get ride of them. I was hoping maybe you could shed some light on this for me. Sincerely, Betty-jean
This appears to be an eastern boxelder bug, Boisea (formerly Leptocoris ) trivittata (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Rhopalidae). They are nuisance pests that seldom do any real damage. See http://tinyurl.com/5haez8 for more information, including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2524  I live in Valley, AL. My kids and I went on a walk down the road like usual and my daughter brought this to me to show me...It looks like It may be a beetle larvae..but I am not sure because it is so furry and purple to red coloring. Thought you guys could help! Thanks.
This a caterpillar of a butterfly in the family Lycaenidae (blues, hairstreaks, coppers, etc.). These caterpillars are so variable in appearance that specific identification by sight alone can be nearly impossible. That aside, yours might be a Henry's elfin (Callophrys henrici) - see http://tinyurl.com/ylbjlha for a couple pf examples.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2523  Hello, Spotted this little bug in a park in south western Ohio, back in late May. Could someone identify it, please? Thanks, Diana.
This is a plant bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Miridae); likely the bearded elf plant bug (Taedia johnstoni) - see http://tinyurl.com/yhrrryx for an image.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2522  I found in the laundry sink in the basement. Now that I looked closer at it and have looked through your website, I think it may be a cricket but of course I would prefer an expert opinion. Also, do they bite if I pick it up to take it outside? Are they harmful in my house?
Thanks so much! Websites like yours take away a little of the initial fear - knowing what it is and also knowing that one isn't alone! :-)
Kind regards, Jacqueline
This is a camel cricket (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae; subfamily Rhaphidophoridae). Sometimes also known as cave crickets, they prefer dark, moist environments (including basements/crawl spaces), and may become nuisance pests indoors. They do have strong jaws and could give you a nip much like a cricket or grasshopper if handled carelessly. See http://tinyurl.com/2gwrco for more information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2521  Hello. I have a big insect phobia and so I have found two of these in our house. The carpet is rather deep, so once they are spotted they hide inside the carpet. I was able to get this one and take a photo. I live in Northern Utah in the US. I also keep a very clean house, so I hope it's not some sort of cockroach. Please let me know. I am itching all over just from looking at the photo. I know I'm not in Canada, so I really appreciate your help. Thanks so much, da.vn
This is nothing to worry about, it is a rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae) that accidentally wandered inside. This is a very large family, the vast majority being general predators on other small arthropods, and thus usually considered beneficial; a few species live as ‘guests’ in ant colonies. See http://tinyurl.com/kvzxt3 to get some idea as to their diversity.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2520  My family and I were walking the banks of Lowville Park north of Burlington, ON on Sunday, September 27, 2009 (3-4 pm) looking for spawning salmon when we came across this lovely arachnid. She was in a plant right on the banks of 12 Mile Creek within 50 feet of a pedestrian bridge. Clearly she's caring for her young as two of the photos clearly show offspring inside the web built around the plant.
I have never seen a spider this large in Canada outside of a zoo or other exhibit. Legs relaxed, this creature was approaching 10 cm (3-4").
Is it a wolf spider? Best regards, Robert
This is a fishing/nursery web spider (family Pisauridae), it looks like Dolomedes tenebrosus, a widespread species that can attain quite an impressive size - see http://tinyurl.com/mfgda6. Females carry their egg sac about until the eggs are nearly ready to hatch, at which time she attaches the sac to vegetation, builds a nursery web around it, and stands guard nearby. The young then live in the nursery web for some time after hatching.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2519  What a great site! Exactly what I needed. I found my bug right away and because of the information, also found the source of the problem.  Why am I writing then? I have a little USB microscope and got some better pictures of the rice weevil (pretty sure) than you had. I thought you could make use of them. Thanks a lot, Vince
This indeed appears to be a rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae - see http://tinyurl.com/yzr3c2p   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2518  This one found on a beach along with hundreds of others. Some were floating in the water seemingly washing up on shore but then running around all over the sand. They were not large spiders – about and inch long. Thank you, Sharon from Winnipeg
This is a male (note the enlarged pedipalps) fishing/dock spider (family Pisauridae); in the genus Dolomedes - see http://tinyurl.com/yjjclxg for an example. Like their cousins, wolf spiders (family Lycosidae) they are active hunters that do not spin a capture web. Large specimens can give one a painful bite if mishandled, but they are not dangerous to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2517  Would you be able to identify the larvae in the attached pictures. They were found in potted lily plant and had eaten into the lily bulbs. There were a great number in the pot. Sharon
These appear to be maggots (larvae) of a fly in the family Syrphidae. Most of these flies are neutral/beneficial, with the larvae of several species predaceous on aphids and the like. However, as in many large families, there are ‘rogues,’ and this one is no exception. There are a few that are plant pests and your appear to belong to a group known as ‘bulb flies’ that will feed on a wide range of bulbs/tubers - see http://tinyurl.com/yzgang4 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2516 This bug was found on my neighbor's porch. It crawls slowly like a caterpillar. It is very dark in color and it's head is at the big end, recessed. My neighbor picked it up and the head came out like a turtle's head. It seemed like it was trying to attach her. Please help me identify it. I live in Texas, I have never seen one of these before. Thanks
This is a larva of a sphinx moth (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) just about ready to pupate; likely that of Eumorpha fasciatus - see http://tinyurl.com/ykytrwa for details. Caterpillars of this species are extremely variable in appearance; the combination of a dark median dorsal stripe and lack of an anal ‘horn’ usually serves to separate them from similar-appearing species.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2515  We saw this interesting insect while visiting Kruger National Park in South Africa. Looks a bit like a flying shrimp. Would like to know what it is and if they are found in North America. Thanks, Irv.
This is a clear-winged sphinx moth (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae), sometimes known as hummingbird moths or bee moths. This one may be in the genus Cephonodes (sometimes spelled Cephanodes) - see http://tinyurl.com/ylf9bxv for an example.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2514  Hi, I took this photo about a week ago, in a south west Ohio park. The bug is about 3/4 of an inch long and was found on Golden rod. I thought it might be a spined assassin bug. Any thoughts? Thanks, Mark.
It certainly could be a spined assassin bug (Sinea diadema; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) - see http://tinyurl.com/yftgg74, but because of the angle from which the photo was taken, I cannot be completely certain.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2513  I found this, as well as a few others under my bed and under the actual bladder of my water bed. Could you please tell me what they are and how I can prevent/control more from appearing as well as possible causes as to their appearance in the first place? I live in Alberta. Your help would be appreciated, Thank You!
This is a shed ‘skin’ of a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/skin beetles); possibly in the genus Anthrenus - see http://tinyurl.com/daun2s for an image. These larvae will feed on a wide variety of proteinaceous materials, primarily those of animal origin such as wool, silk, furs, hides, and accumulations of dead insects. See http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for detailed information, including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2512  I live a little east of Chilliwack, BC. This type of spider is all over outside my place. There are little ones and big ones. What kind of spider is this? Should I be concerned about it?  Thanks, Roberta
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae); it appears to be one known as the foliate orb weaver or foliate spider (Larinioides cornutus), see http://tinyurl.com/ygjya45 for an image. All orb weavers are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2511  My son found this spider hanging out in our yard in north east Ohio (zip 44408). We’ve never seen one like it before~ can you tell us what it is? Thanks, Cindy
This yet another orb weaving spider (family Araneidae); it is Argiope aurantia, a very widespread species that goes under a number of common names - see http://tinyurl.com/4qjtqt for images and detailed information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2510  This rather large bug was found on the back of my buddies truck in Strathmore Alberta. I have lived in that town for 20+ years and have never seen a bug like this before. So what exactly is it? Thank you for your time, Jeremy
This is another giant water bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Belostomatidae) - see no. 2506.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2509  Hi, I'd like to know what kind of spider this is. It was on a leaf of an olive tree, September on Salt Spring Island, BC thanks
This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae), likely the goldenrod crab spider, Misumena vatia - see http://tinyurl.com/yfjpjfq for images and detailed information. These spiders are ambush predators that lay in wait for lunch to walk/fly within striking distance; they are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2508  This spider scared the daylights out of a passenger in my car. She felt it crawling on her shoulder. This was in Ottawa, October 7, 2009. We would very much like to know what kind it is (and where it came from!)
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae), perhaps another cross orbweaver (Araneus diadematus) - see no. 2505. Like most members of this genus, this species can be highly variable in colour pattern. All orb weavers are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2507  I found this wasp in a dead maple tree. While I was splitting it one of them stung me giving me a reaction of hives, swelling and shock. It looks to me like it's a Horn Tail but they aren't supposed to sting. I wish I kept the one that stung me but it flew away, so it is possible that it was a different type. This happened on Sept 27th in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. If anyone can ID it that would be great. Thanks, Mark
This is a horntail (Hymenoptera: Siricidae), likely Tremex columba, known as the pigeon tremex - see http://tinyurl.com/ylh4jpy for detailed information. These indeed do not sting, so whatever nailed you was something else, perhaps a wasp in the family Vespidae.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2506  I found my cat playing with this bug outside my door around 10.30 at night. I live in a small town in southern Ontario. The date was Oct 8, 2009. Does anyone know what it is, I have never seen anything like this before. It has wings but was not flying.  Thank you, Patrechia
This is a giant water bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Belostomatidae), a general predator on other aquatic insects as well as tadpoles and small minnows - see no. 2335 for another example, and http://tinyurl.com/nrvpb for much more information. They are strong fliers that can be found quite some distance from any water source.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2505  My wife Cheryl took this photo on our back step, and from looking over your website, I'm guessing it is a healthy Orb Weaver. Photo taken in Markham, Ontario Canada October 2009. Cheers Action Jackson
You are correct in believing this to be an orb weaver (family Araneidae); it is in the genus Araneus, most likely Araneus diadematus, often called the cross orbweaver - see http://tinyurl.com/m5jnh3 for detailed information. However, there are other species in this genus that can have quite similar colour patterns.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2504  Hi.. I'm Nadia from Malaysia. Me and my colleague found this insect which looks like a big ant (we're not sure whether it's an ant or something else) in the treatment room where we worked. Could you please help us identify this insect? Thank you.
This is indeed an ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae); it might be Camponotus gigas, known as the giant forest ant - see http://tinyurl.com/yjrqfxw for images.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2503  Can anyone identify this little worm? I have found several of these on top of the carpet in my daughter's 2nd floor bedroom.  The majority of these worms were near the wall where the baseboard meets the wall, beneath a window area but the window stays securely shut. This bedroom is above a formal living room, which is above a basement-level finished play room. Some other worms were a bit across the room, but they seemed to be "traveling" away from the pack. These creatures are beige in color with a definite brown tip which seems to serve as their front -- they move in the direction of the tip. There is no antennae or hair on these. Help! I am grossed out and my daughter doesn't want to sleep in her room!
This looks like a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) larva, see http://tinyurl.com/yhu9ov8 for an example. These all feed on plant material of some kind; most species found in homes are seed feeders (such as in whole grains, nuts, etc.) and thus most commonly are found in food storage areas. As this is not the case in your instance, look for any seed-containing items (such as dried wreaths) that have bee brought indoors, or even acorns - see http://tinyurl.com/4b76ts for details. Regardless of their precise identity, they are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2502  Hello, I live near Salt Lake City, UT. My kids found this bug out in our front yard. I have no idea what this is. It looked like a huge mutant offspring from an ant and a wasp. Thanks!
This insect is most commonly called a Jerusalem cricket (Orthoptera: Stenopelmatidae); it is in the genus Stenopelmatus. See http://tinyurl.com/5qrdrk for more information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2501  Hi! After 3 weeks out on holidays, I've found these small 1/5 ' (5mm) long flies around the flat (mostly kitchen) upon my return now in September. Researching, the closest match I found was the cluster fly, but these seem to be darker, have a bigger abdomen and they don't cluster at all, just stay in the ceiling and the walls, one here, one there... They fly slowly enough to be caught in the air. Are you able to identify this fly? I'm living in the Czech Republic. Many thanks! Best regards, Pedro.
Based primarily on the appearance of the costal wing vein, this fly may be in the family Drosophilidae (pomace/vinegar flies). They sometimes also are (erroneously) called ‘fruit flies’; true fruit flies belong to the family Tephritidae. Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2500  Hi: I found this bug near grand bend ....southern lake Huron ....Ontario Canada ..and was wondering what type of bug it is...I am sure that one like it bite me on the arm last week.....a small but nasty bite that resulted in a small open wound after a couple of days.  Thanks, Terry
This is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae), probably Zelus luridus - see http://tinyurl.com/lr3ejl for an image. Assassin bugs are general predators on other small arthropods, and usually considered beneficial. Larger assassin bugs can deliver a painful bite, but usually only if you mishandle one. Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2499  We live in Northern New Jersey. We’ve seen these come through the windows on the upper floors of our house for the past few months.  Seems like some type of beetle or weevil. Any ideas?
This is a leaf-footed bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae) known as a western conifer seed bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis) - see http://tinyurl.com/yfgs49v for an image. These bugs frequently come indoors during cool weather to seek shelter. They do no damage there, but definitely can be nuisance pests.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2498  Hello, I spotted this strange spider on it's web in a bush here in central Alabama. Unfortunately I was not able to use a tripod which accounts for the somewhat blurry photos. I estimate it size to be about equal to an aspirin tablet. Best regards, Jack
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae) called the crab-like spiny orb weaver, Gasteracantha cancriformis - see http://tinyurl.com/yfmhkzb for an image. They are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2497  Hi there, I found this spider in my back yard in Halifax, Nova Scotia this afternoon (October 12th, 2009). I've looked through your photos and can't seem to find one like this. Thanks for your help! Claudia
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae) that is off its web. I suspect that it could be Araneus trifolium, sometimes known as the shamrock spider. This spider shows extreme variation in body colour and pattern, but the leg banding appears to be fairly consistent. See http://tinyurl.com/ybxh6bz for some examples.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2496  Hello, I was sitting next to this spider, not sure what kind of species this is. Was told might be a brown recluse or a wolf spider. The spider was brown with some black marks on top of stomach and a black bottom.  The location of spider Arizona, United States.
The image is too fuzzy to be certain, but this looks more like a wolf spider (family Lycosidae) than anything else. It most definitely is not a recluse spider (family Scytodidae) of any sort.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2495  Can you please identify this flying insect? It seems to have a wicked stinger. There have been one or two much larger ones outside our house in the past week. But I have never seen one before in my life. Steve M.
This is a robber fly (Diptera: Asilidae). They are ambush predators on other small arthropods, usually darting out from a perch to nab something that has blundered within striking range. They then return to their perch for a leisurely lunch. They are not venomous, but large specimens can deliver a painful bite if mishandled. This is a very large family, see http://tinyurl.com/l8x3ho for some examples.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2494  Can anyone identify this spider? Location Kamloops B.C. Thanks for your help, Jeff
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae) in the genus Araneus; likely Araneus gemmoides, known as the western plains orbweaver - see http://tinyurl.com/y9w5wgy for images and detailed information.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2493  Hi this guy is big and living in a web in our front garden, with legs extended about 2 inches. What is this type and species. Thanks, Steve
This is a female Argiope aurantia, a common orb weaver (family Araneidae) that goes by a number of common names - see http://tinyurl.com/2yw6f6 for detailed information. They are harmless to humans, and your specimen should get a lot fatter as she matures and gets ready to lay her eggs.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2492  The bug is about 1 inch long. 12-15 of them have been found under the insulation in basement. It looks like they live in the walls.
What do they eat? How to locate the infestation area and exterminate them? Thanks in advance, Daniel
This is a house centipede (Scutigera coleoptrata), a cosmopolitan species often found indoors where it feeds on other small arthropods - see http://tinyurl.com/brohra for detailed information. The presence of large numbers of these creatures usually indicates that abundant prey (insects, spiders, etc.) are present. If you can find and eliminate these, the centipedes will go away on their own accord in search of easier pickings.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2491  Saw this ominous (well ominous looking to me) guy in my basement den. I'm pretty sure its some variant of a wolf spider, but I just want to make sure.
This is not a wolf spider, but is in a related family (Agelenidae; grass/funnel web spiders). It is a male in the genus Agenelopsis (see http://tinyurl.com/ygr32s3 for an example), likely wandering about in search of a receptive female. They are harmless to humans.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2490  I live in Central Texas area. I found this giant moth type insect on the side of my brick garage this morning. When I first saw it I thought it was a dried yellow autumn leaf but at closer look I could see it was a strange insect. The shape was a complete circle when I took first picture. I thought it was dead. 20 minutes later when I when out to look the wings had began to close so I knew it was alive.  I hope you can tell me what it is. I have a lot of trees in my yard but they are live oaks, a pecan and several crape myrtles. When fully opened it appeared to be about 4 inches in diameter.
 This is a mating pair of Imperial moths, Eacles imperialis (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae). They formerly were placed in a family of their own (Citheroniidae), but this now is considered a subfamily (Citheroniinae). See http://tinyurl.com/lhamn6 for detailed information.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2489  Hi, We found this insect in our back yard in Comox, British Columbia. It looked pretty scary, like it could give a good bite. It measures 2.7 cms from the tip of his head to the tip of his tail. Err, I guess that's called his abdomen? I've included a picture from above and below. I would love to know what it is. Kevin
This appears to be a repeat of Number 2455, which was thought most likely to be Ulochaetes leoninus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) 
 Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2488  Hi, I love your website, very cool. I saw two of these critters in one day in my kitchen, so the thought of an infestation crossed my mind, but I haven't seen any since, so I'm not too worried. I am curios what exactly it is. He is curled in on himself in the picture, and when he died he stuck out that giant stinger? sex organ? But when he was alive he clearly had a body structure similar to a honey bee, and moved his wings like a mud dobber. We are in central Virginia, and we have had a very buggy year. So far we are competing with cockroaches, silverfish, two types of ants and fleas for our space.  Thank you for your help, Mackenzie S
This is a cuckoo wasp (Hymenoptera: Chrysididae); they are parasitic on the young of other insects, primarily those of solitary bees and wasps - see http://tinyurl.com/ykxprv8 (the example shown is a species different from yours). Their heavily armored body along with their ability to curl up into a ball help protect them from their reluctant hosts.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2487  Found this guy in my dryer, biggest spider I've seen in my area, wondering what it is and if its venomous. Thanks, Trevor, Alberta, Canada. 
The image is not clear enough to be absolutely certain, but this most likely is a barn funnel web spider, Tegenaria domestica (family Agelenidae) - see http://tinyurl.com/c2jgc9 for more information. Although large specimens may bite if mishandled, they are not dangerous to humans.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2486  We live in Minnesota and found this huge spider in our barn. I couldn't get a good clear picture of the top, but this is the bottom side of it. I would like to know what it is. 
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae) in the genus Araneus, but it is difficult to make a specific i.d. without a dorsal view as well.   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2485  Hi, we live in Richmond, BC. Just found these creatures on the floor in our living room. What is it? Is it harmful to us? What we can do to get read of them? We have a small child.  Thank you a lot for your help.
These are small caterpillars, but I cannot provide a specific identification. About all that I can say is that they do not appear to be any of the species considered indoors pests, such as meal moths or clothes moths, and that they most likely are accidental intruders that pose no harm to you.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2484  I have found a few of these around the house this year, we live in a more rural area of Ontario. I spotted a couple in the bedroom, one on the bed (I hope they haven't infested my bed!!) and a couple in the kitchen on the counter or in the cabinets. The photo doesn't show the color well, but they have a light stripe across their back that is approx 1/3 of their body and it is dark on either side. They are quite small, only about 5-6 mm. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks, Brenda
This is a larder beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae); likely Dermestes lardarius - see http://tinyurl.com/l6ndgr. These insects feed on a wide variety of materials having a high animal protein content, and may become pantry pests.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2483  We live right on the north shore of Lake Ontario about half way between Toronto and Kingston. This morning I found this guy/gal on our deck. As you can see he is all white with pink racing stripes down each side. Can't ever recall seeing anything like it. Could someone identify it for us and is it normal or some kind of albino? Thanks in advance. Ken D.
This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae); specifically, it appears to be a goldenrod crab spider, Misumena vatia - see http://tinyurl.com/y9bgj3l for detailed information. This spider can be quite variable in appearance, and has some capability of changing its background colour to better match its surroundings.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2482  Could you please identify this bug for me. We seem to have an infestation of these on our front porch area and all over the wood frame surrounding our flower beds. Also seen just inside the front door around the door jam. Do they pose a problem? Thanks!! TC
This appears to be a chinch bug (Blissus sp.; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Lygaeidae). These can be serious turf pests in some areas - see http://tinyurl.com/ych54re and http://tinyurl.com/yc3ee4w for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2481  I found this bug on my deck, I live in Shelburne, Nova Scotia please identify. This bugs body is as big as your thumb.
This is one of the so-called ‘dog-day cicadas’ (Hemiptera/Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadidae); likely in the genus Tibicen - see http://tinyurl.com/yan94yw for an example. They have a shorter life cycle (usually less than five years) and emerge later in summer than periodical cicadas (Magicicada sp,).  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2480  Hello web manager, This (bee, wasp, B-17?) insect was found alive on our kitchen floor in central Alabama. I've never seen anything of this nature as large as this thing was. We dispatched it by placing it in the freezer for a while and, alas, it tended to shrivel up a bit. It was glorious in life however. Best regards, Jack
This an eastern cicada killer (Sphecius speciosus; Hymenoptera: Sphecidae). Although they resemble overgrown yellowjackets, they are not aggressive; you just about have to actually pick one up carelessly in order to get stung. Males are stingless, but may ‘get in your face’ to defend their territory. See http://tinyurl.com/a3nj45 for images and much more information on these fascinating insects.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2479  What kind of spider is this (see attached picture)? Is it at all dangerous? Is that an egg sac on its back or a poison sac? It about the size of a nickel and I'd say the sac is slightly larger than a pea.
This is another orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae) in the genus Araneus, possibly a shamrock orbweaver, Araneus trifolium; see http://tinyurl.com/ybxh6bz for some examples - this species is highly variable in appearance. The ‘sac’ is just its abdomen; its venom glands are in the narrower ‘head’ part at the front of its body. All orb weavers are harmless to humans; just dangerous to insects!  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2478  Hello - I found this one in a blueberry bush in Chilliwack BC. I think this website is a great educational tool and would love to know more about this spider. Thanks!
This is an orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae) in the genus Araneus, but I cannot be certain of its identity from this view - it may be Araneus diadematus - see http://tinyurl.com/ybzt34u for an example, and no. 2474 for a dorsal image.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2477  Attached please find a photo of a caterpillar my grandson found in his garden…What is it? Keith & Keegan, Corner Brook NL 
This is a larva of a sphinx moth (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae); specifically, it is a laurel sphinx (Sphinx kalmiae) - see http://tinyurl.com/lyd3fa for images and more information. 
Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
 
2476  My 2 year old was playing with her toys and came out of her room screaming and crying...when I asked her to show me what happened, she took me over to where she was playing and showed me a spider....she has never seen a spider and I have never told her to be afraid of them so i am wondering if maybe it bit her. The problem is I don't know if this spider is dangerous or not. I took a picture so hopefully someone can help identify it. Thank you Britney
This could be a wolf spider (family Lycosidae) - see http://tinyurl.com/qroqtq for an example. These spiders often find their way indoors while searching for prey. Although large specimens are capable of inflicting a painful bite if mishandled, they are not dangerous to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2475  Not a sure what this is termite? Earwig? Found it running down the hallway in an medical building in NJ. Tom
This is a mole cricket (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae); lilely a northern mole cricket, Neocurtilla hexadactyla - see http://tinyurl.com/y9y9tql for images and more information. 
Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
 
2474  I believe this is an ord-weaving spider, but would appreciate it if anyone could verify this.  I found it in the early evening, weaving a web between the rear deck of our car and a hanging flower basket attached to the carport, here in Pickering, Ontario. Chris
This is an orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae) in the genus Araneus; likely Araneus diadematus, a European introduction known as a cross spider, St. Andrew’s cross spider, or European garden spider - see http://tinyurl.com/ybmd5wc for an image. All orb weavers are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2473  I noticed that my recently planted (Aug 15th) sweet potato vine is quickly being eaten. I would really like to know if this particular insect will infest my other houseplants (Schefflera, Dieffenbachia, Sansevieria...tropicals mostly) The larvae (caterpillars?) are green as shown, are 'fuzzy' and are approximately 1cm when not stretched out (when crawling, I'd say an additional .5cm) They also leave some kind of threads on the leaves (along with their black droppings) The second image is not as clear, but shows scale with the dime pictured. I am in Newmarket, Ontario Thanks for any help!
I cannot be certain, but this might be a larva of a plume moth (Lepidoptera: Pterophoridae) - see http://tinyurl.com/le5gtn for an image. These are quite small caterpillars that often spin silk as they feed, and thus may cause the leaf to roll up to some extent. They are not likely to be serious pests on your house plants; members of this family that are considered pests usually feed on leaves of grapes, geraniums, or lantanas.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2472  Hi, I was wondering if anyone can identify the dark brown cocoons? I found these lying on the ground in Ruskin, BC under some cedar trees in the Summer, in the 1970's. Take care, Susan
These appear to be the papery cocoons of sawflies; the smaller one (it may have been parasitized) may be that of a diprionid (see http://tinyurl.com/yde8sxx for an image) and the larger ones those of a cimbicid, such as the elm sawfly (see http://tinyurl.com/yjtpfbs for an image).  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2471  Hello, we just purchased a home in Thunder Bay, Ontario and these little green beetles are swarming the outside of our house and deck. They are about 5mm in length and have a slight gold metallic sheen on top of the green colour. I have never seen one fly but my husband is pretty sure he saw one fly away. If someone could identify it, we would greatly appreciate it as getting annoying finding them stuck to our hair, clothes, etc.! Thanks
This is another short-snouted/blunt-nosed weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae); see no. 2470 for another example. This one could be in the genus Polydrusus; see http://tinyurl.com/y89652y for an example.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2470  Hi. I found this small beetle on a leaf of a spike plant in Grimsby, Ontario, about 1/2 hour outside of Toronto. I'm hoping someone can help me identify it.  I love this website. Thanks for all the help in identifying pests. Sincerely, Lisa
This is a short-snouted/blunt-nosed weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae); see nos. 2427, 2246 and 2304 for other examples. These weevils frequently enter dwellings in search of winter shelter, but do no damage there. They are general foliage feeders as adults, usually causing a characteristic ‘notching’ injury to leaves. The larvae usually are root feeders, and some, like the strawberry root weevil, can be serious pests. See http://tinyurl.com/l3s2rw for a fact sheet that shows the leaf notching and includes control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2469  I found this bug in my apartment in Saint John, NB. It was crawling up my heating pipe in the bathroom. Can't say too much else about it. It had numerous small legs underneath its body.
This is a crustacean in the order Isopoda commonly known as a sowbug or woodlouse. For the most part, they are harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter, but occasionally can damage very tender vegetation.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2468  Hi, this is the 4th beetle like this that I have seen in the past year. This one was at our campsite in southern Alberta, in fact we had 2 more show up during the weekend. It looks like an Asian Longhorned Beetle, but aren’t those found in Asia? Can anyone confirm? Thanks, Robin
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the genus Monochamus; possibly the white-spotted sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus – see http://tinyurl.com/kqsddr for an image.. This is a native species.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2467  This is not an indoor pest, but after looking over your page and seeing how many insects have been identified, I would like to know what this insect is. I live in Rapid City, SD and I find this insect on various wildflowers in the area.
These are not pests of any kind, but are predators on other small arthropods. They are ambush bugs, previously placed in the family Phymatidae, but now are included in the assassin bug family (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae). See http://tinyurl.com/mju68a for more information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2466  Been seeing this spider for a week or two now and am unsure what type it is...its fast and thought it was a funnel spider, but has weird markings on its back.. the funnel spiders around here have lines going from one end to the other, I live in Ontario Canada and wanted to make sure this isn't something hazardous to me or my cats.. I have taken pictures of a couple but the one attached is the clearest.... please help me identify.... Pat
This could be a funnel web spider (family Agelenidae) in the genus Tegenaria – see http://tinyurl.com/c2jgc9 for an example. Large specimens can deliver a painful bite if mishandled, but otherwise are harmless.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2465  Is this a sphinx moth? I found it inside the screen tent we use to survive the mosquitoes here in Nova Scotia. Thank. Lalia
This is indeed a sphinx moth (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae); likely the laurel sphinx, Sphinx kalmiae – see http://tinyurl.com/lyd3fa for images and more information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 
2464  We have recently been infested with these small beetles. We noticed them initially on the rug in the basement. We thought they were carpet beetles but they do not appear to match the description. We have tried dusting the rug with Borax and have had limited success. I captured the beetle in a plastic bag, scanned it on my scanner along with the end of the a pencil so that you can see the relative size. Thanks, Dave
This is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); possibly one of the species in the genus Sitophilus that can become pantry pests in whole grain products – see http://tinyurl.com/sht3 for a fact sheet.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2463  Hi there, just moved to a new apartment last month and found this creepy sucker in my bathtub and then on my wall, I’ve looked through the pictures on your site and I’m really hoping it’s not a cockroach. Clearly you can see that the bug is wet and dead, hopefully the pictures are clear enough to give me an identification so I know what I’m dealing with and what steps I need to take as I have an 11 yr old daughter who is terrified of bugs and a newborn. Thanks. Pamela
No need to worry about this one; it is a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae), a harmless general predator on other small arthropods. They often come indoors while searching for prey.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2462  Hi there. I know this isn't the clearest photo but it's the best one I was able to take of this big spider that showed up on my basement screen door. He measured about 3.5" long. Maybe a Fishing Spider but I am not sure. Thanks, Mark
This could be a fishing dock spider (family Pisauridae) in the genus Dolomedes – see
http://tinyurl.com/nwftdf for an example. They can deliver a painful bite if mishandled, but otherwise are harmless to humans. 
Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2461  Hello I hope you can help me with an infestation of six legged larvae/worms that have infested our birch tree. (I found three) measuring approximately 7 to 9 cm on average. There are hundreds if not thousands in the tree. One leaf may be containing 1 to 20 of these on it’s surface. They are yellow and greenish, with black spots or broken stripes. The heads are yellow to sometimes chokecherry red in colour. The six legs are frontal and some of them will have their back ends raised up or raised to make an “s” shape I think in trying to mimic the stems of the birch leaf. They appear to come from the ground and climb up the trunk of the tree. They have stripped off about 80 percent of the leaves.
Thank you for your time.  .Jonathan, Pembroke, Ontario
These are sawfly (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae) larvae, possibly those of the birch sawfly, Arge pectoralis – see
http://tinyurl.com/lg6vf6 for an image. 
Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2460  I was wondering what type of spider this is, I found it in my grapes i got from Costco. Thanks
This is a widow spider (Latrodectus sp.; family Theridiidae). Based on the orange rather than red ventral ‘hourglass’ and banded legs It more likely is a brown widow spider (Latrodectus geometricus) than a black widow - see http://tinyurl.com/md24xe. Although the brown widow reportedly is considered less dangerous than the black widow, it still should be treated with caution to avoid being bitten.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2459  I found this very large fly in my swimming pool, I have never seen anything like it. It's back is camouflage color just like an army suit. Can you let me know what this is please? Maryse
This is another ‘dog-day’ cicada (Hemiptera/Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadidae) - see No. 2457.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2458  I’ve never seen one like this before. It’s about 1.5 inches long has a fuzzy white head and is quite aggressive. It reared up and took a swipe at the pen my neighbour was probing it with. The web seemed pretty standard except for a fuzzy area right below where the spider was sitting. It also shook the web quite a bit when disturbed. I found it on my shed. I live in Saint-Zotique in south western Quebec about 9km from Ontario and less than a kilometer from the St Lawrence river. It’s mostly farm land around here.
This is Argiope aurantia, a common orb weaver (family Araneidae) that goes by a number of common names - see http://tinyurl.com/2yw6f6 for detailed information. They really are not aggressive, but respond quickly to any disturbance. Spiders tend to treat objects either as potential food or potential threats, and react accordingly. All orb weavers are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2457  We found this fly out on the deck, in Nova Scotia. From the head to the tip of the wings is 1 1/2 inches. It is alive but does not move much.
This is a cicada (Hemiptera/Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadidae); likely in the genus Tibicen - see http://tinyurl.com/mcg3r7 for an example. Often called ‘dog-day cicadas’ or ‘harvestflies,’ they spend their immature (nymphal) stages underground sucking sap from tree roots, then tunneling to the surface to shed their ‘skin’ and emerge as adults that live just long enough to mate and lay eggs.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2456  This bug was found early in the morning, clinging to the pole of the umbrella that goes over our patio table. It was about 2 inches long (at least). My family is very interested in identifying it. Thanks. Lalia
This is a crane fly (Diptera: Tipulidae); likely in the genus Tipula. This is a very large family with thousands of species (see http://tinyurl.com/l2zxv9 for a sampling); the adults are completely harmless, but the larvae of a few species can be turf pests, feeding on roots of grasses. Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2455  Hi, We found this insect in our back yard in Comox, British Columbia. It looked pretty scary, like it could give a good bite. It measures 2.7 cm  from the tip of his head to the tip of his tail. Err, I guess that's called his abdomen? I've included a picture from above and below. I would love to know what it is. Kevin
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) that has the wing covers (elytra) greatly reduced. It might be Ulochaetes leoninus - see http://tinyurl.com/q2l79m for an image.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2454  Is this an egg sac of some sort? It's hanging off the top left side of our back door. We live in central NC, USA. Thanks!
This appears to be an egg sac of an orb-weaving spider in the genus Argiope, such as the common garden spider, Argiope aurantia - see http://tinyurl.com/lpzt2o for an image.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.


 

2453  I have recently found this spider making a web around my shed in my back yard in St. Catharines Ontario. It mainly comes out at night. I was just wondering if it is poisonous and if it should be destroyed.
This is an orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae); likely in the genus Araneus. All orb weavers are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2452  I found this nest on a screen in my basement, in southwestern PA in August, and am wondering what is going to come out of it. Thanks.
This appears to be a cocoon of a caterpillar in the family Arctiidae (tiger moths, etc.). They usually seek out a sheltered spot near ground level to construct their cocoons and pupate.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2451  This insect was found in Forest Ranch California outside on a tarp one day by a friend of mine. Karen
This is a treehopper (Hemiptera/Auchenorrhyncha: Membracidae); it appears to be the striped morph of the oak treehopper, Platycotis vittata - it also appears to be the same specimen submitted to another site - see http://tinyurl.com/lgf3yf for an image. Reportedly, these usually do not occur in large enough numbers to cause real damage.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2450  I'm from middle Tennessee, I found this bug in my bathroom. Can someone tell me what it is?
This appears to be a nymph of a cockroach, likely that of a German cockroach, Blatella germanica - see http://tinyurl.com/knhlzo for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2449  Found this creature in our yard in Calgary, Alberta. Called it a caterpillar for want of something better. It is about 3 inches long and about 3/4 inch thick.
This is a shpnx moth (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) caterpillar, apparently that of a great ash sphinx, Sphinx chersis - see http://tinyurl.com/lfwgat for images and detailed information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2448  Hello -- my kids found this interesting insect, which I imagine is a beetle of some kind, on their grandparents' farm in South Western Ontario. Before they were able to catch it we watched it flying (it has quite large black wings not visible in the picture as they are tucked up underneath). It is approx an inch and a half long with three identical black markings along both wings and one black marking on either side of the thorax. The centre dark brown marking where the wings meet is outlined in black. We've enjoyed examining this guy and my 9 and 6 year old sons would like to know what type of beetle they've found. Hope you can help. Thanks! K. Gerber
This is a spotted or grape pelidnota, Pelidnota punctata (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae); see http://tinyurl.com/nlmazt for images and detailed information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2447  I saw a few of these in Cumberland Bay, New Brunswick. Thank you.
This spider is in the family Pisauridae (fishing/dock/nursery web spiders); likely the dark fishing spider, Dolomedes tenebrosus - see http://tinyurl.com/cxfeaf   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.


 

2446  Hi, I found this moth in northern-eastern Saskatchewan Aug 6th. I picked it up off the sidewalk and got a couple pictures before returning it back outdoors. When I placed it on a branch it hung by it’s front legs. I’ve never seen one like it before and am if you can tell me what kind it is. Thanks!
This moth is in the family Noctuidae - see http://tinyurl.com/nd43np for an example with a similar resting pose. I don’t recognize this particular species, but if I can pin a name on it later, I’ll update this answer.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.



 

2445  Good morning - we found two of these bugs when we were recently in Saskatchewan. Body length is well over 1". Can you please help us identify it? Thank you.
This appears to be an elm sawfly (Cimbex americana; Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae) - see http://tinyurl.com/nhzt8s for an image. Their larvae are leaf feeders that superficially resemble caterpillars - see http://tinyurl.com/n9td89 for an image.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2444  I found this insect (about 1.5 cm long) in my garden, grazing on a daisy on a warm summer day in Victoria, British Columbia. Any ideas on identity?
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). It is one of the so-called ‘flower longhorns’ in the subfamily Lepturinae, resembling the species Xestoleptura (formerly Anoplodera) crassipes - see http://tinyurl.com/ng7ecj for an image.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2443  Hi, there! I've got a rather shy guy in the corner of my kitchen that lives under my heater, and he usually only comes out at night. I'm just hoping he's not a brown recluse spider! (When not taking disturbingly detailed photos of him, I've grown rather fond of him, and have named him 'Jack II', as I believe he's replaced another that used to live in that spot.) I live in Vancouver, BC. Thanks so much for your help! This is such a great site. Tara
Whatever this is, it is not a recluse spider, they do not occur in your area, and usually are not found in webs. I suspect that this is one of the cobweb spiders in the family Theridiidae, but I really need to see a dorsal (upper side) view.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2442  My husband was cutting wood and this bug flew past his head and landed on a log.  We have no idea what it is, and would like some help. We are from Lloydminster  SK Thank you
This is a wood wasp (Hymenoptera: Siricidae); it appears to be Urocerus gigas flavicornis - see http://tinyurl.com/l7rpnk for an image. Larvae of these wasps bore in the wood of dead or dying trees.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2441  The Spider was found by my children in Northern Saskatchewan while on Vacation at my parents lake house. I would like to know if it is potentially dangerous because there is no Hospital where they are and the nearest Emergency Medical attention is by Helicopter. Thank you, Colleen
This is an orb-weaving spider (family Araneidae) in the genus Araneus, possibly Araneus diadematus , known as the cross orbweaver - see
http://tinyurl.com/m5jnh3; all orb-weavers are harmless to humans. The only truly dangerous spider in Saskatchewan is the black widow (Latrodectus hesperus) - see http://tinyurl.com/mhbves for details.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

 
2440  Hi, Location London Ontario, though it might have traveled with blanket (it was found on) from Cayuga Ontario as it was found after a weekend visit to in-laws. Thinking it is a semi-mature bed-bug but would like a more knowledgeable identification. Thanks! Paul
This is a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae). This is a very large family with thousands of species, most of which (like this specimen) are predaceous both as larvae and adults on other small arthropods. However, as in any large family, there are some rogues that can be garden pests.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2439  Hello, I found these guys living under my stove. At first I thought they might be house centipede larvae, but after looking on your site, I'm thinking they are carpet beetle or larder beetle larvae. They are distinctly black/brown/white striped, move very quickly, and aren't seen in the house. (I only found them when I was cleaning underneath the stove.) Please help identify and provide control/extermination assistance. Thank you!  Andrea
This is a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (hide/skin/carpet beetles) in the genus Dermestes. The species Dermestes lardarius is quite common and is known as the larder beetle. They will feed on a wide variety of organic matter, primarily that of animal origin (including cured meat products). See http://tinyurl.com/l6ndgr for more detailed infomation.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2438  I would appreciate if you could identify this ant species for me. Thanks, Rob
This could be a carpenter ant (Camponotus sp.), but an image showing it from the side would be helpful. In profile, the thorax of carpenter ants appears smooth from front to rear; other similar-appearing ants have a distinct suture that interrupts this smooth line. Also, carpenter ants have a circle of fine golden hairs at the end of the abdomen. See http://tinyurl.com/kk7kcs for an example of a carpenter ant.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2437  I have seen a few of these throughout the years and was always curious as to what they are. It has eight legs plus the two articulated arms with pincers (claws) Found in bathroom by ceiling. Does it pose a threat?
This is a peudoscorpion, a tiny arachnid related to spiders and true scorpions. They are general predators on other small arthropods, and are completely harmless to humans. See http://tinyurl.com/lk9k23 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2436  Hi This insect is about the size of a fruit fly. They somehow sneak into the house even when the screen window is closed. They are attracted to light and love to stay around my laptop screen or lamp. Please help me identify this bug. Thanks, Michael Y
This looks like a fungus gnat (Diptera: Sciaridae) - see http://tinyurl.com/llc5zu for an example. Their larvae feed primarily on fungus and decomposing plant matter in very damp to wet soil; they sometimes will damage tender roots and stems of plants in such situations. The adults are completely harmless.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2435  Hi there, was wondering if you could identify this insect for me. I've predominately seen them around the kitchen, and sometimes bathroom, however, they do make their way into the living room from time to time. They seem to be slightly aquatic because when I'm trying to wash them down the drain, they don't seem to be throw off by the water. I've seen them making their escape down the drain sometimes. The average length that I've seen is around 1"-1 1/4", but the one in the picture was a younger one, because it was only about 1/2"- 3/4". I live in Calgary, Alberta. Any information is greatly appreciated, thank you!
This is a nymph of a cockroach, likely a German cockroach, Blatella germanica. See http://tinyurl.com/meaj3f for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2434  Hi there, This bug was found in CBS, Newfoundland. It's commonly referred as a Timber fly locally, and Is also suspected to be poisonous (I've heard of a couple deaths). However, upon searching online I am unable to find further information, which leads me to believe that it is known globally by a different name, please do your best to identify this insect.
This is an absolutely completely harmless (to humans) parasitic wasp in the family Ichneumonidae, perhaps in the genus Megarhyssa - see http://tinyurl.com/lsfy5d for an example. These wasps lack venom, and use their long ovipositor to bore into the tunnels of their prey, larvae of wood wasps in the family Siricidae.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2433  Hello, This was on our pear tree in our backyard. We also have a cherry tree back there. Would you be able to tell me what kind of insect this is? Thank You! Sharon, Toronto, Ontario
This is a cicada (Hemiptera/Auchenorrhyncha: Cicadidae - see http://tinyurl.com/lb4ppt) that has just emerged from its nymphal exoskeleton. It will darken in color as the adult exoskeleton hardens.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.


 

2432  Is this a bed bug, or a weevil? I can't really find much else that's close to it. Vancouver, BC
This is a short-snouted/broad-nosed weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae); it resembles Otiorhynchus sulcatus, known as the black vine weevil - see http://tinyurl.com/24rhv6 for a fact sheet.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2431  Can you please identify this beetle? The house is very old, these beetles have been discovered throughout the house! They appear to have wings hidden, and the body almost appears to be tapered at the rear if I see correctly . First thought is some form of pantry beetle; drugstore beetle, but other concern is furniture or post beetle; unfortunately many possible influences from pet food storage, pet hair, or dry good storage and or abnormally damp seasonal conditions! I also looked similar to Tenebrio or darkling beetle. Thanks
This beetle is indeed in the family Tenebrionidae and appears to be in the genus Tenebrio - see http://tinyurl.com/ktqwdr for an image of Tenebrio molitor; its larva is known as the yellow mealworm.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2430  Trying to identify this insect. Any idea? Brian
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae); it might help to know how large it is and where the photograph was taken.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2429  What is this? I saw this thing flying around a butterfly bush in my backyard last summer--It's the most beautiful bug I ever saw. Can you help I'D this creature?
This is a clear-winged sphinx moth (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) in the genus Hemaris - see http://tinyurl.com/65fz46 and http://tinyurl.com/ktqj7x for examples. These moths sometimes are mistaken for small hummingbirds or large bumble bees because of their habit of hovering at flowers as they take a nectar meal.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2428  Hi, hoping someone can confirm. I used to think they were mites, but believe them to be springtails?? Live in Massachusetts and have noticed these little things for about 5 years, and they are getting worse. My whole house and inside and outside are infested (I would say by the millions) between spring and fall. They move really fast and conjugate into groups. I have seen them jump about 2-3 inches when touched. When killed, they leave a brown stain. They love water, algae, any food. They come out of every crack, window sill, and copper piping that leads into the house. I have even found them on our bed linen. Despite using a professional exterminating co. for the last 5 years, they are still here! Desperate for how to get rid of them!!! Please help.
This indeed is a springtail (order Collmbola), possibly in the family Tomoceridae - see http://tinyurl.com/p9q9yt for an example. These creatures are very susceptible to desiccation and require abundant moisture in order to thrive. Therefore, the primary weapon in controlling them is moisture discipline. You should do a thorough inspection of your premises, including the area immediately surrounding your home, and eliminate to the extent practical, all unnecessary sources of moisture. This includes, but is not limited to, leaky water pipes/taps/hoses, condensate from air conditioning/refrigeration units, overly moist mulch beds, etc.. Also, lowering indoor humidity levels should help as well; unless steps such as these are taken, chemical control alone pretty much is futile. You can take some comfort in that they simply are nuisances that do little if any real damage.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2427  Hello, we live in an old farmhouse in Campbellford, Ontario. In the last few days we have been getting a lot (hundreds) of these pests both outside and inside the house. They seem to be mostly on the west side. They have a hard shell and drop off the walls when there is sudden movement or vibration caused by banging the wall. What are they ? and how do we control them ? Jim
This is a short-snouted/blunt-nosed weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae); see nos. 2246 and 2304 for other examples. These weevils frequently enter dwellings in search of winter shelter, but do no damage there. They are general foliage feeders as adults, usually causing a characteristic ‘notching’ injury to leaves. The larvae usually are root feeders, and some, like the strawberry root weevil, can be serious pests. See http://preview.tinyurl.com/l3s2rw for a fact sheet that shows the leaf notching and includes control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2426  Can you tell me what kind of spiders these are. They are hanging out on my porch, eating moths.
These are orb-weaving spiders (family Araneidae), They could be in the genus Araneus (see http://tinyurl.com/c45yoj for an example) or Neoscona (see http://tinyurl.com/psxgl9 for an example. All orb weavers are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2425  I’m in Indiana and haven’t seen the bug in the attached picture. My other question is what kind of insect builds a nest like that? Thank you so much for helping me figure out what these are. Joann
This appears to be a female cockroach in the genus Parcoblatta - see http://tinyurl.com/ozm4o7 for an example. Whatever structure is in the photo with the cockroach is unrelated; these insects do not make ‘nests’ of any sort. They are woodland creatures that will occasionally wander indoors, but they do not appear to colonize there.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2424  Found this and some others under a rock by a river in central Ontario.
These are pupae of eastern dobsonflies, Corydalus cornutus (Megaloptera: Corydalidae); mature larvae (hellgrammites) leave the water to find a drier place in which to pupate. See http://tinyurl.com/nnmunl for images and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2423  What kind of bug is this? It resembles a Box Elder but seems much brighter. It was from the river valley in Edmonton in late ,
July. It landed on my leg but as I'm not a Manitoba maple did not think it to be a Milkwood beetle. Hope I'm not bugging you too much and will bookmark your informative and interesting site. Thanks, Michael
This moth is in the family Arctiidae, subfamily Lithosiinae (footmen/lichen moths). This one appears to be a scarlet-winged lichen moth, Hypoprepia miniata - see http://tinyurl.com/kklv6y for an image. You might want to report this sighting to the "Talk About Wildlife" site for Alberta at http://tinyurl.com/klrqpc   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2422  Hello, I found this bug near my bed - I really hope I don't have some sort of infestation. I have had a few odd bites on my arms/legs that were itchy in the passed week but this is the first time that I've caught a bug. I did a bit of research and I think its an assassin bug, but I'm not fully certain.  I took a couple pictures.. oh and I'm from Toronto, Ontario, Canada Thanks all the help, Matt
This is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae). These bugs can give a painful bite, but usually will not do so unless provoked (such as in picking one up). The only species of any concern from this standpoint is an introduced species (Reduvius personatus) known as the masked hunter; it readily comes indoors if there are any other insects there for them to prey upon. See http://tinyurl.com/egdfr for more information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2421  Hi, I hope you can help us with this. This was on my window this morning so the pics are taken from it's underside. This insect has returned to our backyard just north of Toronto for 3 years years. It is black. It is about 1.5 - 2 inches in length. It makes it's home between the interlock by burrowing out the sand. Once it's home is made, we see it flying back to it's home carrying live grasshoppers. I have tried many sprays etc. to get rid of them but no luck.  Can you help me to identify it, how do I get rid of it, it's really intimidating! Rhonda
This wasp is in the family Sphecidae; it may be Sphex pensylvanicus, which preys primarily on long-horned grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Tettigoniidae). See http://tinyurl.com/kp8dt4 for images and more information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2420  We live in Pa and found this already dead on a sidewalk. We brought it home to identify, can you help? Thank you, Sue
This is a female eastern dobsonfly, Corydalus cornutus (Megaloptera: Corydalidae). See http://tinyurl.com/nnmunl for images and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.


 

2419  Hello, I found this dead bug on the window sill on July 23, 2009.  It is black with the yellow color near the back end. Hope someone can help me identify it.
This appears to be a plant bug in the family Miridae - see http://tinyurl.com/nph3sd for an example. This family includes several species that can be plant pests, such as the tarnished plant bug (Lygus lineolaris - see http://tinyurl.com/ljkzn8  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2418  I recently purchased a kitchen table second hand, right now it is on my back porch in Eastern North Carolina.  I am currently in the process of painting it and discovered these bugs in the crack between table top and table leg.  I want to find out whether they are wood eating/destroying bugs, wouldn't want to introduced them to my house and furniture. I would appreciate any help in figuring out what they are.  Thanks, Sonja.
These are not structural pests, but you still don’t want them in your house as they are cockroaches. They appear to be nymphs of German cockroaches (Blattella germanica) - see http://tinyurl.com/n7ezfw for a fact sheet that includes links to control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2417  Hello, I live in Kamloops, British Columbia and have found many of these bugs in my garden. The first one I found was on a Liatris flower spike and seemed to be feeding on a dead bumblebee. These insects seem to hide amongst the flowers waiting for other insects to come by and feed. The bug is no more than 1/4" long and looks like a small dead leaf or flower at first glance. I would love to know what they are. Sincerely, G. Danby
 These are ambush bugs. They once were placed in a family of their own (Phymatidae), but now are included as a subfamily (Phymatinae) in the assassin bug family (Reduviidae). See http://tinyurl.com/msh3lz for detailed information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2416  I found this when I felt something eating my arm outside the house. Abbotsford, BC, Canada
This is a larva of a green lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae). They are voracious predators on other soft-bodied arthropods (see http://tinyurl.com/n6g3ch for an image of one in action). For some strange reason, they may nip a person if they crawl on ones skin, but this is harmless.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2415  I went to your web site to post my bug when I noticed one that looked like mine already there (#2394). I have better pictures though. This was found on my fence in Belleville Ontario. Before this guy showed up I had a major spider problem a couple loonie to toonie sized ones, and several small ones. (a lot of mosquito's keep them fed) I was able to get very close without it moving, while close it was keeping a close eye on me, but did move its antenna a bit)
 This is indeed another example of a male eastern dobsonfly (Corydalus cornutus; Megaloptera: Corydalidae) as shown in no. 2394.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2414  These arrived a few days ago - Eastern Shore of Maryland. They are like a plague of locusts, burying themselves in unopened flower buds (mostly marigolds) and sucking the life out of them. I've tried the usual repellent sprays, nothing works. I thought they looked like lightning bugs, but not exactly. Thank you for the opportunity to find out what they are - been searching for 2 hours to no avail.
As you already are aware, this is a blister beetle (Coleoptera: Meloidae). I saw your posting on whatsthatbug.com, and can’t really add much more other than that I do not think it is Epicauta hirticornis either. It more likely is a variant of a native species such as Epicauta trichrus Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2413  Just 10 minutes east of Calgary in Chestermere, AB, this little fellow (2” long) flew in the garage and after being smashed with a ball cap sat stunned on my driveway. The exposed stinger was 1 cm long but had a weird little head unlike a wasp or hornet. What is it? There are a few of those usually flying around the large trees in the back yard.
This is a wood wasp (Hymenoptera: Siricidae); it may be the yellow-horned horntail, Urocerus gigas flavicornis - see http://tinyurl.com/ne76de for an image. What appears to be a stinger actually is its ovipositor, used to lat its eggs in the wood where its larvae develop.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2412  Thanks for your hard work maintaining this site and responding to so many questions. I found this guy alone in our house in Northern New Jersey, and have seen one or two similar ones outside (not on the house). Any guidance would be much appreciated...
This appears to be a very large ant, perhaps a queen carpenter ant (Camponotus sp.) - see http://tinyurl.com/kwvdsh for an image.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2411  Great site. I'm from N.W. Arkansas and these tiny pests are stripping my canna lillies. They are only a mm across and maybe 3mm long. When I first looked I thought it was some kind of mold or mildew but on closer inspection I found hundreds of these little guys. Thanks for the great site and for any info you might have...John Springdale, AR
These are tiny wasps, and unlikely to be responsible for any leaf damage on your cannas. Rather, they could be parasites/parasitoids on the critters that actually are doing the damage.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2410  I found this bug on my picnic table the other night. I live in Nova Scotia, Canada. Does anyone know what it may be? Lisa
This is a fishfly (Megaloptera: Corydalidae; subfamily Chauliodinae) - see http://tinyurl.com/lcaqdr. It is in the genus Chauliodes, likely Chauliodes pectinicornis - see http://tinyurl.com/le8gvj for an image.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2409  This bug was found in a bathroom in Toronto Ontario.  Please help! Carol
It is very difficult to determine exactly what is going on here - this appears to be a portion of an insect or other arthropod; possibly with something else feeding on it. At any rate, it does not appear to be anything to be alarmed about.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2408  Hello. This creature flew into our house today. He was about the size of a large house fly but moved faster. We have never seen any thing like him before. Could you please give us some information on this bug?  We live close to Nanaimo, British Columbia. Thanks, Lynne
Number 2408 - This fly is in the family Tachinidae; they all are parasitic on other arthropods. This a large and varied family; although many species can be quite hairy (as in this specimen), others are not - see http://tinyurl.com/n235tn for some examples.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2407  Hello could someone please tell me what kind of caterpillar this is? It was found in southern Ontario, could you also include references. Thanks
This caterpillar appears to be in the family Arctiidae, but I hesitate to put a specific i.d. on it; it may be an immature saltmarsh caterpillar, Estigmene acrea - see http://tinyurl.com/n34d73. These caterpillars can be extremely variable in appearance.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2406  I live in Ottawa, Canada and have discovered many - about a dozen - of these insects on my main floor over the past couple of weeks. They are about 1 inch in length. What are they and should I be concerned? Your help in identifying this insect would be most appreciated. Kathy
This image also is too fuzzy for a positive i.d., but it has some resemblance to a wharf borer (Nacerdes melanura; Coleoptera: Oedemeridae) - see http://tinyurl.com/lf5zqw for an image. However, these usually are a fair bit smaller than what you describe. If this is what you have, they will not attack sound timber, and should not pose any threat to your home.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2405  A bunch of these on woodpile look like tiny black ants. Small size about 1/16" or so. Fast crawlers central New Jersey, USA
The image is too unclear to be certain of a specific identification, but there are at least three possibilities: (a) little black ant, Monomorium minimum - see http://tinyurl.com/lgu486; (b) acrobat ant, Crematogaster sp. see http://tinyurl.com/cpy8pg (in this case, you should have noticed some of the ants having their ‘tails’ in the air while running about - see http://tinyurl.com/ltxvnd); or (c) odorous house ant, Tapinoma sessile - see http://tinyurl.com/l678du   Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2404  I live in Elora, Ontario (North of Guelph) and I found these two moths on the same morning in early July; we have a large old wooden garage door with a light over top that stays on all night, and we often get a lovely display of moths, but have never seen these before; since taking these, we have seen several more of the silvery looking one, but not the other one. The one with the “eye” on the wing pattern is huge, probably 4 inches in length; never saw the wing span, as when I returned later in the day, it was gone. The silvery one is about 3 inches long.
The moth on the left is a sphinx moth (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae); apparently the waved sphinx, Ceratomia undulosa - see http://tinyurl.com/nabcb2. The one on the right is a giant silk moth (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae); likely a polyphemus/volare moth, Antheraea polyphemus - see http://tinyurl.com/gydfd for images and detailed information.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2403  My family and I spotted these insects whilst hiking in Algonquin Park, we think they are some kind of wasp? They were quite large, the body portion was approx 2.5" long, with an omnipositor(?) of approx 4". They looked to be depositing something (eggs?) into the bark of this red maple tree. They have some sort of tail which looks like a leaf. Could you please help us to identify them?
Thank you, The Atkinson Family
This is a female giant ichneumon wasp in the genus Megarhyssa; likely Megarhyssa atrata - see http://tinyurl.com/axadon. She is in the act of using her ovipositor to bore into the tunnel of her intended victim, the larva of a wood wasp in the family Siricidae. The leaf-like appearance of the end of her abdomen is caused by the great expansion of the intersegmental membranes during the operation of her ovipositor. All wasps in this family are parasitic on other arthropods and are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2402  Hello, I live in Parkersburg WV. I was totally amazed and a little scared by this bug. I’m calling it a “Bly”…fly and bee mix. It is actually quite huge…the size of a big bumble bee. Please help me. Will be impatiently waiting,  Stacy
This fly is in the family Tachinidae - see http://tinyurl.com/lpsuvu for a similar example. This is quite a large and varied family, all of which are parasitic on other insects.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
2401 Hi, this insect was found inside our house in Hamilton, Ontario. This is the third one. Looks like a carpet beetle but we want to be sure. Thanks for your help.
It could be a black carpet beetle (Attagenus unicolor) - see http://tinyurl.com/nfygdy - but it is difficult to be certain from such images. Nonetheless, be on the lookout for larvae that look like http://tinyurl.com/lsyw2h - this is the stage that does the damage. If you do have these beetles, see http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for detailed control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad. Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

Looking for pest control supplies? 
Buy from a reliable Canadian source listed on this web page:
Supplies for Pest Control

 

More Photos:   SPIDERS ONLY    #1 to #100,      #101 to 200 ,      #201 to 300,         #301 to 400,   
  #401 to 500      #501 to 600        601 to 700        #701 to 800       #801 to 900       #901 to 1000        
   1001 to 1100    #1101 to
1200     1201 to 1300     1301 to 1400    1401 to 1500      1501 to 1600      
   1601 to1700      1701 to 1800      1801 to 1900        1901 to 2000        2001 to 2100       2101 to 2200    
  2201 to 2400     2401 to 2600     2601 to 2800      2801 to 3100          3101 to 3300    3301 to 3600 
3601 to 3900
    3901 to 4100    4101 to 4300   4301 to 4500  4501 to 4700   4701 to most recent  



HOW TO GET RID OF BEDBUGS  

   
Find the solution to your infestation.

      Bed Bug Control Products and Professional Control Solutions

 
 

 


Pest Control Canada.com

  Pest Solutions for Canadians
Page Index        
Advertising Information
 Ants,
Ant nest photos   
Ask the experts, 
Bats,
Bedbugs
Bees,
Bee Stings
Birds,
Booklouse
Box Elder Bugs
Bug Identification
Bushy Tailed Woodrat
Carpenter Ants,
Carpenter ant photos
Carpet Beetles
Canadian Pest Management Association
 

 

Canadian Pest Pros.
Centipedes
Choosing a pro,
Classified ads,
Clothes moths
Clover Mites
Cockroaches,
Controlling pests,
D
elusionary parasitosis
Employment ads
Finding a Pro
Fleas
Flies
 
Gnats
 
Phorid Flies
Flour Beetles
Get rid of :
    
Bedbugs
    
Carpenter Ants
    
Mice
Gnats

 

Grain beetles
Hantavirus,  
Health Hazards
Home page,
Index page
Indian Meal Moth
Insects,
I.P.M. ,
Ladybugs
Lice
Mice,
Millipedes
Mold
Mould
Moles,
Mosquitoes
Moths
News
Orchard bees
Organic pest solutions
Other pests,
Packrat
Pantry Pests
Pesticides
Pest health hazards
Pest pro Associations
 Alberta Assoc. 
 British Columbia
 Ontario
 Quebec
 Canada
 International

Pharaoh Ants
Phorid Flies
Pill Bugs
Powder post beetles,
Psocid
Questions and answers
Raccoons,
Rats
Real Estate & Pests,
Rodents,
Rodent clean up
Rodent diseases
 
Silverfish
Skunks

Snakes,
Sow Bugs
Spiders
SPMA of BC
Stored food pests
Supplies for pest control, 
Termites,
Ticks
Wasps
Wasp Stings
Wasp Traps
Weevils
West Nile Virus
What is this pest?
Wildlife pests 
Woodrat

 

 

 

Please report any errors or omissions to Webmanager   Your comments, suggestions, ideas are welcome. 
       Some errors on these pages may be intentional, to prove copyright infringement. 
Privacy policy   
Disclaimer notice
Copyright © 2013 [Pest Control Canada]  All rights reserved.
Revised: 07/18/14

Web site by: P.C.S. (Pro-Com Solutions)