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I just want to thank you for providing such a good resource for bug identification!! I searched and googled and searched over and over again for help identifying a hard shell worm/beetle infest, and thankfully I finally found your website!!!!!  It seems one out of ten questions is on the same pest as I have, but, it was very hard to find anything on it at all.  You provided detailed information, actual pictures to look at, and other recourses to search on the pest. This is greatly appreciated. Many thanks to  Ed Saugstad for offering opinion and providing  info (over and over again, it seems to be a popular pest) I am so happy to finally find something useful and direct to the point.  Many thanks to you!!!!   Glenda from Minnesota

 

Hi, 
I just wanted to say. Your website is amazing! I visit it so often that I've recommended it to others too. It is clear that no other website can compare to it. And does Ed Saugstad help with the website too? He pretty much answers everyone's questions and if it's just a hobby of his to answer bug questions for others then he's amazing too. Big thanks to you and Ed for keeping the website alive.
 Cheers!
Christine

Dearest Mr. Cross
I live in Mass. and have been terrified that I have been getting kissing bugs and have even contacted the CDC then I stumbled on to your site and began searching.  After over one hundred bugs later I found the Western conifer seed bug and I began to breath again.  Thank you so much for this site.  It is a true blessing.
Sincerely
Martha

 

THANK YOU!  I tried over a dozen bug ID sites.  None were as helpful as yours.  We ID'ed "our" bug based on your response to someone from Manchester, England. The Drugstore beetle was a match.  The hint about dog food and sry goods helped us find the infestation in the dog bisuits.  We have been finding them all over the house, but mostly on light colored surfaces or near lighting fixtures in the evening.  I feel so much better having figured this out, which I could not have done without your site. THANK YOU!
Katy

 

Thank you for maintaining this fabulously informative web site and thanks also to Ed Saugstad the retired entomologist, who replies with such useful information so freely!  It is all very much appreciated. Sandra. Quinte West, Ontario. 

 

 

 

 

 


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What is this pest?
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5010  Found this in my chair sun night aug 17 2014. We live in Dayton Ohio area. Its about 5 mm long. Thanks in advance for any help. Orville.
5009  Hi, Found this dead on the floor after we "fumigated" our apartment with raid bug spray. In Toronto, during summer. They're about the length of a finger nail.  Paul.
5008  Hi my name is Ashley and I found this little guy crawling in the grass in my lawn. It was a warm summer day in the beginning of august. I have no idea what kind it is and wanted to know more. As you cans see he is very small.
5007  Seen in central Alberta Canada the prairies.  Lita.

5006  Found this bug inside a core of my peaches that I bought in Sicamous BC. There was also a bunch of eggs in the core as well. What is it and what could happen if a person ate an egg that was in the peach? The bug is 2 cm long and adding his antennas he is 2 cm and 7 mm long. Thank you.
 

5005  My wife found this green and yellow beetle, which is about the size of a dime, on our deck northwest of Toronto.  She has lots of plants and a big garden.  Please advise what it is and if it is destructive.  Thanks. John
5004 Please identify.
5003  This thing was on my arm so I whacked it. Northern Ontario , summer mid day. In a Small city . About 1.5 inch long, ugly.  Tried to look it up but had no luck never seen one before
5002 Good morning from Cranbrook, BC! It's August 25, 2014 and I'm looking for some help identifying this guy.  The closest thing I've found online is a Greek wort biter. They don't seem to have wings, they chirp constantly, even during the day, until I walk close to them. Thanks for your help!
5001 Hi! This fly was found floating in our pool in Winnipeg. Largest fly I've ever seen! Can someone tell me what this is??? 
This is a female black horse fly, Tabanus atratus (Diptera: Tabanidae). They feed primarily on the blood of large mammals, and their slashing ‘bite’ can be quite painful. See http://tinyurl.com/m8vx694 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5000  I found this on Ottawa, Ontario today (August 19,2014). It flew into a light pole and seemed to have stunned itself. After a while it started moving around again and eventually flew away. The length of the body is about 1 1/2 inches in length. Do you know what it is?
This is an annual/dog-day cicada (Hemiptera/ Auchenorrhyncha : Cicadidae) in the genus Tibicen; possibly T. canicularis - see http://tinyurl.com/kuxma6z for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4999  Found outside in Little Bald Lake cottage area between Buckhorn and Bobcaygeon Ontario, Canada. 
This is a nymph of a green stink bug , Acrosternum hilare , Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae). See http://tinyurl.com/m8htpe for images and more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4998  Looking for help to identify this beetle.  Location: PEI, Canada. Very moist environment in an unfinished basement. (cement floor with lots of bare wood beams).  Large amount of beetles present. Approx 1/2 inch in length. Time of year: July.  Ethel
This is a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae); species such as this one generally are considered beneficial as they are predators on other small arthropods. They often find their way indoors during their searches for prey. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4997 Hi. I live in Hamilton, Ontario. The bug on right is about 1/4 inch long in body. The other is over 1/2 inch. They are showing up more and more plentiful on my back deck where it is warm. Thanks for the great web work. Nick.
These appear to be two different nymphal instars of the brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae. This is an introduced species that has the potential to become a serious pest, especially in fruit orchards. See http://tinyurl.com/btmxkup for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4996 Attached is a photo of a strange caterpillar that was on the outside door frame the other evening and morning. It was about 1 inch long and seemed to be spinning a cotton ball like fiber around itself. Date: Aug 16, 2014. Location: Near Tiverton in Midwestern Ontario.  Thanks for your assistance. Carol
This is a larva (caterpillar) of a white-marked tussock moth, Orgyia leucostigma (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae). It may be preparing to spin its cocoon. See http://tinyurl.com/955uvk5 for details on its life history. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4995 Every spring to fall we have several of these large spiders outside our living room windows in Kingston, Ontario. This fellow's body looked to be about 1 to 1-1/2 inches in length. These spiders show up on their web in the evening, and I presume retreat to the soffit area during the day. The shield-shaped pattern on the back is something I notice only when taking the photo using my camera's flash.  Thanks!  Sharon
This is an orb-weaving spider in the genus Larinioides, likely L. sclopetarius  (this species occurs on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean); see http://tinyurl.com/36rmrb2 for an image. All orb weavers are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4994  This is the best picture I could take they are in Arkansas and came out in the summer after we bombed our house with pesticides they bite humans but don't seem to mess with the animals they leave small red patches that itch extremely bad. Karma
You appear to have an infestation of bed bugs. See
http://tinyurl.com/o3lbykq for an Arkansas Department of Health fact sheet on bed bugs that may assist you in combating them. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4993  My name is Daniel and this insect was found in my kitchen in TORONTO, ONTARIO.  There have been many of these found in my apartment in various sizes and they run away when the lights are turned on.  I have found groups of them under my wifi router where I believe they were laying eggs.  Generally I find them in the kitchen and dining room hiding in dark places.  Daniel
This is a nymph of a cockroach, likely that of a German cockroach (Blattella germanica; Blattodea: Blattellidae). This species is notoriously difficult to control; you might try consulting a professional pest management service in your area - see http://tinyurl.com/kf28w7m for some options. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4992 Finding these on a wood window sill.  Could they be related to fine sawdust falling from the T& G pine ceiling?  They were about 6 mm long when alive.  K.M.C.  Gulf Islands, BC.
These could be small wasps or bees, but the images are not clear enough for a positive identification. It is quite unlikely that they would be responsible for the sawdust you are seeing.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4991 This insect crawls in my clothes, is in my car, at my job. With me everywhere and flies around me when other people are around.  
This appears to be a scuttle fly (Diptera: Phoridae); their larvae will develop in just about any accumulation of decomposing organic matter (they love our kitchen scraps container and compost bucket!), Control depends on locating and eliminating larval food sources -  see
http://tinyurl.com/nuewvua for detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4990  Here is the bee/wasp! From Lacombe Alberta. 7:00pm outside in the back yard. My name is Jason
This is a horntail (Hymenoptera: Siricidae), it appears to be a banded horntail, Urocerus gigas. Horntails lay their eggs in the wood of trees that usually are dead or dying and the larvae develop there and often are parasitized by ichneumon wasps in the genus Megarhyssa. See
http://tinyurl.com/kgbf4dr for images and additional information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4989 Hello, I found this little guy this evening, down by my veggie garden. He's about 1.5 inches long, and his antennae are another 2 inches long. He was sitting on an old alder trunk that we used as a post for the fence to enclose the garden. My husband said he found another, bigger one, a few days ago. What is it? We live in the Shawnigan Lake area, on Vancouver Island. Kind regards,  Alison
This is a banded alder borer, Rosalia funebris (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae); they cause no harm as their larvae feed only in dead branches of hardwood trees, primarily alder and ash. See http://tinyurl.com/mef3abv for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4988  Hi, I live in North Carolina and this morning I noticed this on my wall. Its black and thought it was mud from the dog. I went to wipe it off and I saw a white worm come out about half way. Can you please help me identify it.
This is a case-bearing caterpillar; the only one of these that would be of concern is the case bearing clothes moth, Tinea pellionella (Lepidoptera: Tineidae) - see http://tinyurl.com/m4yybq9 for an image. Another species in this family that could occur there is the household casebearer, Phereoeca uterella - see http://tinyurl.com/ov8mf33 for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4987  end of July. we opened our window in Oshawa Ontario and some tufts of grass fell. took a closer look and there was 8 sac looking things embedded in the grass. fairly large about just over an inch long half inch wide differed slightly in shades of light to med brown with a dark ring around them near one end. being so large im unable to guess as to what they are. used a stick to pry the dead grass out and noticed several different sized grasshoppers stuffed in there possibly as food for the babes after they are born perhaps. the grasshoppers weren't entirely dead either some had small movements so not sure if they are stunned or poisoned. there was a fair sized amount of grass stuffed into my windows as well. about 8-10 feet above ground must've taken a long time as the was about 3 handfulls of grass that i pulled out.. hope you can help. thanks
This is the work of a wasp in the family Sphecidae, genus Isodontia, known as grass-carrying wasps; they commonly nest in narrow cavities such as those formed by window tracks. See http://tinyurl.com/7dfculs for more detailed information on these fascinating insects. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4986  I discovered these beetles on some plants on the bank of the Mississippi River near Almonte, Ontario, on a warm sunny dry day on July 5th. They were everywhere, and were demolishing the plants they were on. They are small, approximately 5mm long.  They seemed to be eating a number of different plants including willow. They seemed to fly a lot, and while photographing them I got quite a lot on me and they did not seem inclined to leave. Alun
These appear to be imported willow leaf beetles, Plagiodera versicolora (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), see http://tinyurl.com/kpuy3o3 for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4985 Hi my name is Nichole and I was wondering what kind of bug is this and is it dangerous, I live in Edinburg, pa and my kids found it on our tree  in the front yard it has see through green wings and its brown & green and I want to make sure its not dangerous around my kids they are really young and don't know any better and they will pick up any type of bug they find so please let me know what type of bug this is if possible for my kids safety thanks
It’s a newly emerged annual (dog-day) cicada, likely in the genus Tibicen, and is completely harmless. See http://tinyurl.com/osejhu6 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4984  We live in Spain and found this beetle crawling down an exterior wall of our house. It is about 5cm long in the body. I have never seen anything like this in Spain before and I have seen many strange bugs during the last 30 years!!
It’s a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae); I cannot be certain from this image, but it looks like a Cerambyx sp. (see http://tinyurl.com/oau3nsk for an example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4983  I live near London Ontario, Canada.  We found a handful of these insects on a wooden chair beside our pond yesterday, and a few in the gravel.  Today, we noticed that there are swarms of them covering several of our pine trees.  I’m pretty sure they have also devastated some leafy ground cover beside our pond.  Last year, we put loads of mulch in the gardens surrounding the pond, wonder if there may have been eggs or larvae in the wood chips.  Does anyone know what these insects are, will they destroy my trees, and how do I  get rid of them?  Please help, thanks,  Chris
These are insects in the order Psocodea (formerly placed in Psocoptera) known as barklice or tree cattle. They would not be responsible for any plant damage as they are harmless scavengers on bits or organic detritus in bark crevices. See http://tinyurl.com/n6zqxgf for more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4982  Hi, my name is Kelly and I am in Bancroft, Ontario. I have millions of these tiny black bugs everywhere. My lawn is literally crawling with this bugs. The smaller ones have more of a reddish colour with a white strip across the back and the bigger ones seem to be black with white across the back. Would like to know what they are.  
These appear to be nymphs of the hairy chinch bug, Blissus leucopterus (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Blissidae); see http://tinyurl.com/odupswz for an image of nymphs and adults and http://tinyurl.com/njxtqpg for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4981 Hello, my name is Ken, I found these on the concrete floor in the insulated crawl space in my one year old home. Geographical location is Vancouver BC.  Size is 2mm-5mm , very small, flea size and a bit bigger.  Month is August. Crawl space is dry, insulated and about 24 inches below grade.  All vertical walls below grade are concrete with drainboard and waterproofing on the outside.  Inside walls are insulated and have poly vapour barrier seam sealed with caulking.  Heated in winter. These insects crawl and when poke will hop. I’d guess maybe 10 - 20 insects per square foot.  thanks. 
 This appears to be an insect in the order Psocodea known as a booklouse. They basically are nuisance pests that feed primarily on mould spores and the like in humid environments. Occasionally, they may cause minor damage to starchy materials. See
http://tinyurl.com/m6favxe for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4980 This caterpillar was found in  July 2014, on a Virginia Creeper vine which grows outside our house.  This picture was taken in the Ottawa Valley near Eganville, Ontario, Canada.
This is a larva of an Abbot’s sphinx moth, Sphecodina abbottii (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae). See http://tinyurl.com/bsgmjhu for images and detailed information on its life cycle. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4979  I have seen a number of these spiders in our garden near Almonte in Ontario. I have never seen them in the house but they seem to live a good life in the garden which is lightly wooded with a lot of vegetation. This photo was taken on May 5th on a dry sunny evening. The spider has a body that is approximately 15mm long.  Alun
This is a wolf spider (family Lycosidae); they have very good eyesight, and actively hunt down their prey. They are not dangerous to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4978 Hi, these photo's were taken in late summer in Alberta, Canada. These little hard shelled creatures are a centimeter long (or a little less), and some are about 9 millimeters wide. They are stuck to my stucco wall outdoors. Some are hollow with holes. I don't know what it is, it doesn't move  I'm thinking it might be an egg sack.
This looks like a cocoon made by an insect in the order Hymenoptera (bees, wasps, etc.; see
http://tinyurl.com/nsfx5fk for an example), but I cannot say exactly what kind. The holes would have been made either by the adult insect or a parasite emerging from the cocoons. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4977  Hi. My name is Shawn and I live in Bedeque, Prince Edward Island. I've noticed a bunch of these flying around my yard lately and today around my above ground pool I accidentally stepped on one in my bare feet and it felt like it bit or stung me.  The length of it is approximately 1/4"- 1/2" in length. Can you please tell me what this thing is and if we should be concerned with 2 young children around the pool. Thanks in advance. Shawn Harvey.
This appears to be a red-shouldered pine borer, Stictoleptura canadensis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). See http://tinyurl.com/lt6grta for images and detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4976  My cat found this guy in Olds Alberta around mid July. My name is Darrell and I was wondering if anyone could identify it and whether it is a garden pest.
This is a poplar borer, Saperda calcarata (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae); not a garden pest, but they can damage trees. See http://tinyurl.com/ovyt2yz for images and detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4975 These larvae were found in a sweet potato that we bought at a supermarket in the Ottawa Ontario area in Mid-March this year. It looked ok from the outside but the whole of the inside was riddled with tunnels made by a small number of these larvae.  They were small, approximately 6mm long and 1.5mm in diameter.  Alun
This appears to be a larva of the sweet potato weevil (Cylas formicarius; Coleoptera: Curculionidae). See http://tinyurl.com/qdxq9ez for images and detailed information on its life cycle. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4974 This grackle has at least two insects in its beak but it's the yellow winged one I'm trying to identify.  I hope it's clear enough for an ID.  Location: Ontario, Canada, about 40 mile northwest of Toronto.  Thank you. John. 
Unfortunately, about the only thing that I can say about that insect is that it is a true fly in the order Diptera. A clear view of its wing venation and antennae would help narrow down the possibilities. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4973 I found both these guys in two seperate drawers in my dresser the brown looking one was already dead. Freaking out just the thought that they were in my clothes now i have to wash all over again. Are these guys harmful? 
Neither of these beetles would be any threat to your clothes. The brown one on the right appears to be a northern masked chafer, Cyclocephala borealis (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) which is a strict vegetarian - see http://tinyurl.com/oveehnn for an image. The blackish one on the left is a darkling beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae); it may be in the genus Tenebrio, that basically are scavengers that feed on anything from moldy/damaged grain to accumulations of dead insects. They occasionally can be pests in granaries. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4972 I found this beetle this evening in my driveway in Carlisle ON.   It caught my eye because of its size: nearly an inch. It was alive, but not by much. Its front right leg was mangled, and it moved slowly, trying to evade the ants which were already making a meal of it. It did manage to evade them eventually, but seemed to be close to death. I've been through my books, and spent some time online, but have not been able to identify it. I'd appreciate your help. Thank you, Billi-Jean.
Very similar to no. 4964, this appear to be Osmoderma eremicola (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Known as the hermit flower beetle, their larvae develop in punky, rotting wood; see http://tinyurl.com/oumgtls for details on its life cycle.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4971 Taken in York Region, Ontario July 28, 2012 (farm country). Appears to be a cross between a house fly and a grasshopper kinda thingy.
Like no. 4970, this is a robber fly (Diptera: Asilidae), but appears to be a male. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4970  I found this on my BBQ cover.  It is about a 1 1/2 inches long.  Can you tell me what this is? Jack
This is a female (note the ovipositor at the end of her abdomen) robber fly (Diptera: Asilidae). These are ambush predators on other small arthropods, mainly other insects. They sit on a perch that provides a good view of their surroundings and wait until a potential meal gets within striking distance. They then dart out, and if successful, nabs their victim and returns to its perch to dine in leisure. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4969  My name is Tracy, I planted a garden and potatoes for the first time 2 years ago.  These were present then.  I originally thought is was a scab... went to pick at it and it had arms and legs!!!! Went to capture one (I thought of these) and and it flew! It eats holes in the potato leaf.  I didn't plant potatoes last year but they showed up again with this year's planting of potatoes.  Spotted one on a tomato plant too.  This bug was captured July 7th, 2014.  The summer has been more cool and rainy than overly hot and dry in that garden. We are an hour north of Kingston, ON.  The garden is partially shaded, lots of maple trees in the area.  Good Luck, and thanks.
This is a clavate tortoise beetle, Plagiometriona clavata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae); see http://tinyurl.com/pjvd9kl for an image and http://tinyurl.com/3o2lqsm for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4968  HELLO there we have discovered this pest the other day and now when we were coming home last night we spotted over 15 of them  on the stairs  around and behind the baseboard on the back entrance of our home. we live in a 4 level split home that entrance point is what we use as a mudroom. I have also sent you pic of the area where I removed the baseboard and it shows that I have caulk it last night. but I found 3 more this morning. pls help  us on what they are and how to get ride of them thank you.  I LIVE IN CAPE BRETON  NOVA SCOTIA. 
This is a darkling beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), it looks like one of the mealworms in the genus Tenebrio; see http://tinyurl.com/o3amxmp for an example. They basically are scavengers, but can become pests of stored grains; their larvae will also feed on a variety of organic materials, including meat scraps, dead insects, and feathers. See http://tinyurl.com/mkjyqjv for more detailed information including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4967  I though it might be a Japanese beetle or potato beetle it ate all the plants at the side of my house. 
This appears to be Lema daturaphila, a leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) known as the three-lined potato beetle. See http://tinyurl.com/pzxkquj for an image and http://tinyurl.com/owsqtla for more detailed information including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4966 I really hope you can help.  I looked through the spider section of your web page, and couldn't find this one. We live in Nanaimo B.C. And have seen a few strange types that I've found on your site. But never one like this guy who was found in our basement where the kids play. Just want to know what he or she is, and if dangerous at all for the kids. Thanks so much. Kelly Muir.
This is a hacklemesh weaver (family Amaurobiidae) in the genus Callobius; it looks like Callobius severus  see http://tinyurl.com/qjtd6sh for an image. They are not dangerous to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4965  I found this in the skimmer of the swimming pool in Richmond Hill, Ontario.  its about 3 inches long   havent got any idea what it is but it has 2 eyes. Terry.
This looks like a leopard slug that fell into the pool and drowned. See http://tinyurl.com/25rcoae for images of living specimens and detailed information on their biology. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4964  I am from St. Catharines Ontario I have never seen a beetle like this before it has wings and is the size of a Twoonie. It is late July.  Tamara
looks like Osmoderma eremicola (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Known as the hermit flower beetle, their larvae develop in punky, rotting wood; see http://tinyurl.com/oumgtls for details on its life cycle.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4963  Group of grubs found during tree management in mixed forest in cut stump of large dead beech tree in  Haliburton  area, Ontario Canada.  Bill.
These are larvae of beetles, most likely in the family Scarabaeidae (such as an Osmoderma sp.; see http://tinyurl.com/mg5l4gm) or possibly Lucanidae (stag beetles; see http://tinyurl.com/omc6c7n for an example).  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4962  My name jerry Barrens  picture taken in our garden tsawwassen  July 20 2014  BC.   Please can you tell my what kind off beetle this is thank you very  much  
These look like red soldier beetles (Rhagonycha fulva; Coleoptera: Cantharidae), an introduced species. See http://tinyurl.com/m3q4es9 for images and more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4961 Hello, I live on the 12th floor in Vancouver Canada's west end. I few months ago I made a little garden on my patio. Within the first month all my plants had died ( and we love our plants and take good care of them). Last week I replanted the bed and found all these 3/4" bugs living in the roots of the plants. I replaced the soil and they are back killing my new plants. Could you A.) tell me what this is, and B.) suggest a good way to get rid of them. Greatly appreciated. Regards, Marc.
These are pupae of moths, and as such are incapable of inflicting any damage. However, if the caterpillars that preceded them were cutworms, they may have been responsible. Exactly what form did the damage take?  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4960  We saw this bug on a warm, sunny, summer's day in Calgary, basking on a rock by a creek.  It was several cm's long and we've never seen anything like it.  Would be grateful for an ID!  Thanks.  Hannah
This is an exuvium (shed exoskeleton) of an immature stonefly (order Plecoptera). The immature stages (nymphs/naiads) are aquatic, often found under rocks on stream bottoms. When fully grown, they crawl out of the water and after a short while, the exoskeleton spits open and the adult winged insect emerges. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4959  Hi – we are in Alberta, Edmonton area, and we found this insect on our acreage July 12, 2014.  It has been really warm here over this last week (25c +) and we are expecting another warm day.  We would appreciate if you could help us identify it.  Thanks for your time!  We appreciate it!  Rob ‘n Sherri
This is an elm sawfly, Cimbex americana (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae); see http://tinyurl.com/nutk5eh for images and more detailed information. Their larvae (see http://tinyurl.com/ne37esh for an example) often are mistaken for caterpillars. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4958 I've seen a few of these spiders in my basement, the one pictured is one of the larger ones I've seen no more then a inch in size. Not many webs have been seen other then the usual ones in the unfinished part of the basement. We are located in the city of Ottawa Ontario. I hope I can be helped to identify it!  Thanks Erik
This is a male funnel weaver spider (family Agelenidae); it appears to be a barn funnel weaver, Tegenaria domestica. They are not dangerous to humans. See http://tinyurl.com/5owuzh for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4957  These beetle type insect has just started flying up from the ground 4 floors below outside on my deck. They seem to come out just prior to dusk and last for a half hour or so. They seem slow and kinda bounce off the various decks nearby including mine. They have been out for a week or two so far and can be approx 30 to 40 flying around our deck at once. The weather has been slightly dry for the last week or so here in Halifax Nova Scotia.  Keith. 
This a beetle in the family Scarabaeidae that belongs to a grouping of species collectively known as May beetles or June bugs; it appears to be in the genus Phyllophaga. The larvae (“white grubs” of some species can be very serious lawn/turf pests as they feed on roots of grasses just below the soil surface. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4956  This was taken in Langford, BC (suburb of Victoria, BC). It's HUGE. A kind stranger took the photos for me because I didn't want to get close. This was a minimum of 3 inches in length - perhaps between 3 inches and 4 inches long. There are dead ten-lined June beetles all over the garage floor (just outside of photo), and they look like ants compared to this monster. Can you tell me what this is? Does it fly? And when do these start dying off?  Thanks. Nicole
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae; it looks like a California root borer, Prionus californicus. See http://tinyurl.com/kl9t6wl for an image and detailed information on its life history. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4955  What is this. Found in my bed by my hair. Jane M.
This looks like a very mangled cockroach nymph. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4954  I am attaching a photo of a bug that I've seen 3x. First time was during a visit in Hamilton, ON in May 2014. Woke up and found this little sucker on my arm. It was quite attached. Had to pry it off. There was no bite mark or any symptoms of any kind of bite after the fact though. The second time I saw it was on a blanket in Vancouver, BC...this was a day after I came home to Vancouver from Hamilton. Maybe it followed me? But then I saw the EXACT bug on my dog. He got really ill recently and I thought it was ironic that this all happened and this bug was hanging around. My dog subsequently died of a liver related illness. Wonder if it has anything to do with the bug. Luckily I snapped a photo because I thought the bug was so odd....   Thanks,  JENNA. 
This is a hard tick (family Ixodidae) in the genus Dermacentor such as the common wood tick, Dermacentor variabilis - see No. 4929 for another example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4953  Hello, My name is Al and I found this little guy dead on my basement floor a couple of days ago. July 2014. I think I killed two in the house believing that they were flying carpenter ants which I don’t want. The geographic location is Ottawa, Ontario. I looked through all your photos and this may be some kind of parasite wasp (#4805), but I am not sure. The attached picture tries to show the very curly and distinct antenna. Is this a specific kind of juvenile wasp? Great resource. Thanks for this service.
This looks like a spider wasp (Hymenoptera; Pompilidae); see http://tinyurl.com/ppvynyx for an example from Toronto. These wasps seek out and paralyze spiders that they then take to their burrow to serve as food for their larvae. Your specimen likely wandered indoors accidentally. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4952  Found on the island of Montreal in the backyard of a residential area (Verdun). First noticed them around early July, they are still clustered as of mid-July.  They only seem to cluster either on a plant with small yellow flowers or on this vine in the photo. Thanks, Jonathan
These are aphids (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). Commonly known as plant lice, they are sap feeders and some are important vectors of plant diseases. They usually can be controlled by washing them off plants with a strong stream of water from a garden hose, or an application of an insecticidal soap. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4951  These beetle like bugs  are in abundance in our backyard in Windsor Ontario. There are maybe fifty of them chewing the leaves. Just noticed them this year. Can you identify them please. many thanks. Dennis
These are Japanese beetles (Popillia japonica; Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), a very destructive introduced species. See http://tinyurl.com/2chqwmv for detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4950  Last summer and now again this summer, we are starting to catch lots of these in our house (starting in June and going through to September last year).  They are a little brown moth, maybe 1 inch long.  Mostly we find them sitting on something (they like brown towels).  The leave a dusty mark if you try to touch or pick them up.  I'm trying to figure out how they are all getting in!  What are they?  Thanks in advance.  Peter.  Mississauga, Ontario.  
Although I cannot offer a specific i.d. for this moth, at least it does not appear to be any of the cosmopolitan pest species that would infest anything in a home. I suspect that they are finding their way in through any available opening after being attracted to lights at night. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4949 I found this little guy crawling around my bed while I was retiring for the night. It was in May, and the weather was clear. He had a total leg span of an inch or so, and a brownish yellowish color. I live in the North Vancouver, BC area, and see spiders like this entering my home on occasion. What is this little guy called? And will I or my cat be safe if accidently bitten?   I hope to get a response soon, thank you for your time.  Ryan.
This is an arachnid in the order Opiliones - see http://tinyurl.com/qgjn9hs for an example. Commonly known as harvestmen or daddy long-legs, they lack venom glands and are harmless. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4948 Here is a picture of the spider I found in my chives this summer. I've never seen a pure white one like this before. Any idea?  It was taken June 2014 in North-Eastern Ontario, in Timmins Ontario  Thanks, Chrissy
This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae), possibly a goldenrod crab spider; see http://tinyurl.com/lv39adj for an image. This species shows considerable individual variation in colouration. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4947   Several of these guys have emerged from an old sitka spruce log this June. They are 3cm in length. We live on southern Vancouver island. I can't find anything that looks like it online.  Thanks,  Doug
This is Ulochaetes leoninus, a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) known as the lion beetle; see http://tinyurl.com/qgzx545 for images.  It appears to be a wasp mimicking species.. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4946  This flying beetle landed on chair that’s on my sundeck. Location: Nanaimo on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.  Picture was taken in Mid June 2014.
This is Sinodendron rugosum (Coleoptera: Lucanidae), known as the rugose stag beetle. See http://tinyurl.com/n4mrxq4 for an image and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4945  My name is Katie, and I'm from Watrous, Saskatchewan.  Picture taken July 1st, outside.  These flying beetles are all over MANY of my shrubs outside: mountain ash, roses, double flowering plum, tatarian maple, etc. They drop to the ground if you disturb them.  They appear either green or light brown/gold, with black heads/upper body. 
This is a scarab beetle in the genus Dichelonyx, perhaps D. canadensis  (see http://tinyurl.com/nkqswlk for an image; species in this genus are notoriously difficult to separate). They will feed on a wide variety of foliage. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4944  My name is Camilla and i live in Nc i found this bug in my closet and wonder if I should get someone out to spray or if this could have just been a random bug that got lost. 
This is Eburia quadrigeminata, a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) commonly known as the ivory-marked beetle or ivory-marked borer. Their larvae develop in the wood of dead hardwood trees such as oaks, maple, hickory, or ash; they will not infest your home and there is no need to apply any control.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4943  Prince Edward Island, Canada. I keep finding these tiny beetles around the apartment year round, but mostly near the bathroom sink or more alarmingly under the bed sheets and pillow. They are on average about an eighth of an inch in length or smaller. They are black with a shell and translucent brown wings sometimes protruding from the rear. They are shaped like a sleek elongated sesame seed. The legs seem to be tucked under the main body when moving, almost not visible in it’s profile. They have two small antennae visible in their profile. I included a drawing with info, and unfortunately because of the speed of these little guys, the photo shows this one a little worse for wear. He is missing one leg and one antennae on the right and his shell is open with the wings showing. (I tried to stop him from running off the 1/4” ruled page for the photo, but he kind of took a beating). Even with the hard shell, these guys are quite fragile.  Thank you,  Byron
This appears to be one of the grain beetles in the genus Oryzaephilus, either a saw-toothed (O. surinamensis) or merchant (O. mercator) grain beetle. They feed primarily on damaged grains or grain-derived dry stored food products, and can become pantry pests. See http://tinyurl.com/m99jkh4 for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4942  This little guy isn't bothering me, my son just wanted to know what it was...we found him on the kids' swings in our backyard in Glenora, Edmonton this past weekend. Any idea of his/her genus, species, name...habits etc..? Thanks. 
This is a pupa of a lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in the genus Anatis - see http://tinyurl.com/qay6nrd for an example. This genus includes the largest species of lady beetle in North America. They are more often found in trees than on low-laying vegetation; they feed primarily on aphids but will also take small caterpillars and sawfly larvae.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4941  Found in Rhode island USA.  Jacklyn. 
This is a female (its ovipositor is extended) long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae; it looks like a broad-necked root borer, Prionus laticollis. See
http://tinyurl.com/qa5mrz6 for an image and  for detailed information on its life history.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. http://tinyurl.com/m7ldh8q
4940  We love in Hoyt NB  Canada.. it all started last year when i had a napkin that had had banana bread remnus on  it and a day later it was covered in flour beetles and we noticed they have come back again this year and also the bugs i sent in the pic.. we have been spraying in our room where most of the are found and sprayed that corner of the house. Sometimes the spray works and kills them but mostly draws them out..please help.. thanks.. Amanda
This is yet another Dermestes larva; must be an epidemic! See no. 4938.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4939  Attached is a photo of a small 2-10 mm crawler that I am finding more and more of in my home (everywhere!). I have lived in the home for 14 years and this is the first I have seem of them. They crawl like a centipede but have only 3 sets of front legs, and are very "fuzzy" as you can see in the photo.  What are they!? Why do I have them!? What can I do!?   Peter
This is another Dermestes larva; see no. 4938. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4938  Found these bugs on our carpet inside our Log home. Can you please identify the type of bugs and how to get rid of them. Thanks,  Jurgen
This is a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae and the genus Dermestes (larder beetle and allies). These larvae will feed on such a wide variety of organic materials that complete control can be difficult. See
http://tinyurl.com/p7zqooo for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4937 These insects are have been swarming on the front of our house in a Toronto for a few weeks now, especially behind the mailbox. Can you tell me what it is and how to deter it? Thanks.
This is a wasp of some sort, but it does not appear to be of the type that would pose a stinging hazard. If you could provide clearer images, including a side view, I might be able to i.d. it further. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4936 My name is Colton this spider was found on the side of a road in Monte lake BC.
This is a female wolf spider (family Lycosidae) with her newly hatched babies on her back. See
http://tinyurl.com/qxnhswk for an image and http://tinyurl.com/yqmo6z for detailed information on these fascinating creatures. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4935 I'm in Prince George British Columbia and this little guy is on my fennel.  What is he. Thanks,  Tania.
This is another lady beetle larva.  See #4934.
4934 I have these bugs all over from small to larger (1cm). I'm from Winnipeg MB and this pic was taken in July of this year.
This is a larva of a lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), but I am uncertain as to species. Ones like this specimen are predators on other small, soft-bodied arthropods (such as aphids), and thus usually considered beneficial.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4933  Please identify this bug for me, I found it after it bit me. I live in Vancouver BC Canada.  Adam.
This is a larva of a green lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), a voracious predator on aphids, small caterpillars and other small, soft-bodied arthropods. See
http://tinyurl.com/lrzpkr6 for images and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4932  Please see attached pic of bug that we are seeing  for the past month.     90 % of the time they are in my roommate's bedroom-on his walls, top of bed.  He says they come out much more at night.  He doesn't have any bites.  We see them in living room and hall sometimes.    We are in Toronto.  Please advise.  thanks,  A.
This is either a bed bug, Cimex  (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Cimicidae) or a bat bug (). They are very similar in appearance, but your image is too blurry to tell the difference; see
http://tinyurl.com/qnz3oz for detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4931 we live in Lebanon, tn  and have never seen this before- its blue and red and black! if you click on photo it gets bigger and it is a really clear pic . thanks for your help! please email me back when you get an answer.- Vicki and Sean
This is a nymph of a leaf-footed bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae), it looks like an Acanthocephala sp. - see http://tinyurl.com/o3quw2t for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4930  This bug was found crawling on my bathroom ceiling in New Hampshire. I found a few days after I found a dying dog tick in the same room. It's late spring. We have an indoor-only cat whose litter box is located in that bathroom. We went hiking four days ago, with Permethrin on our hiking clothes.  Thank you!  Mary
This is a pseudoscorpion, an arachnid related to spiders, scorpions, etc. They are general predators on other small arthropods, and unlike true scorpions, lack venom glands and are completely harmless to humans. See http://tinyurl.com/lubjn5 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4929  June 18 2014 in Kitchener Ontario.  Kris.
This is a hard tick (family Ixodidae) in the genus Dermacentor such as the common wood tick, Dermacentor variabilis - see http://tinyurl.com/mra8hn7 for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4928 It was between 1 1/2 to 2 inches found in central Wisconsin. Michael.
This is the cast ‘skin’ (exuvium) of a dragonfly naiad (the aquatic immature stage). See http://tinyurl.com/ogqdmhq for images of the dragonfly’s life cycle. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4927  It was hard not to notice this large caterpillar crossing our trail.  We are in Victoria, BC. June 20, grassy path, sunny 20°CDark green back with yellow spots and brighter green underside.  Red horn on the rear end with brown head and back end.  He was a good 8-10 cm in length, fat and solid looking.  The closest match in photos that I could find was to a ceratomia catalpae but it’s not “quite right”.  Tonicha
This is a caterpillar of a sphinx moth (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) in the genus Hyles - see http://tinyurl.com/morqgdzfor an example. Larvae in this genus have extremely variable colour patterns. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4926  Jim sends you this picture from Red Deer Alberta, I believe it is an assassin bug, but which one. It is having a spider for lunch?
This is not an assassin bug, it is a nymph of a boxelder bug (Boisea sp.; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Rhopalidae), common nuisance species. See http://tinyurl.com/nak542z for images and detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4925  Hi there, Found this insect flying around my kitchen yesterday and I had never seen it before. Came across the website and thought this would be perfect to get it identified as my internet searching turned up at nothing. I live on Vancouver Island, B.C. in Port McNeill on the north end. Weather was a fairly sunny and warm day and we have lots of trees in the area combined with some marshy areas about a half kilometer away. Had my doors open for a bit around mid day, guessing that is when it flew in. Insect size is around 30mm long or so from head to end of "tail" -Paul.
This is a clear-winged moth (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae); it appears to be in the genus Synanthedon. At least 11 species in this genus have been reported from British Columbia, their caterpillars bore into the trunks/stems of many different trees and shrubs and some, like the peach tree borer, can be serious pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4924  Just found this slow clingy spider in a t-shirt whilst on vacation on S.  Pender Island, BC.  What kind of spider is this? Annabel
This is a hacklemesh weaver (family Amaurobiidae) in the genus Callobius; it looks like Callobius severus  see
http://tinyurl.com/n4gkamj for an image. They are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4923 This awesome golden beetle landed on my shirt, then hung around on my son's hand for a few minutes.  What is it? Brent.
This is a metallic wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Buprestidae); it appears to be in the genus Dicerca - see
http://tinyurl.com/nudvwnq for images and more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4922 Found 5 or more of these in my bedroom on my desk around some food crumbs. Ants have been appearing here but never seen this kind. What is it?  Bryon
This is a larva of a lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), possibly that of Harmonia axyridis, known as the Asian multi-colored lady beetle; see
http://tinyurl.com/jvozom8 for an image. As these insects are predators on small, soft-bodied insects such as aphids, it seems a bit odd that they would be attracted to your food crumbs.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4921  This guy came crashing into our gazebo this afternoon, he’s about 2½” long and 1” wide.  Thought it was a hummingbird at first when it was flying towards us. Wasn’t able to fly again after the crash.  Rural Eastern Ontario June 26 2014. Sunny 26 degrees Celsius.  Dave
This is a giant water bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Belostomatidae); aka toe biter or electric light bug. They are predators on other aquatic life, primarily other insects, but also sometimes minnows and tadpoles, and can inflict a very painful ‘bite’ if mishandled. Also, they are strong fliers and can be found quite some distance from water. See 
http://tinyurl.com/qg3ah82 for an image and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4920 Could someone please tell what this is. I have been looking for a couple of weeks now and can not find out what it is. Its about the size of a tic, found one only. Steve.
This is a pseudoscorpion, a tiny arachnid related to spiders, scorpions, etc. They are general predators on other small arthropods, and unlike true scorpions, lack venom glands and are completely harmless to humans. See
http://tinyurl.com/lubjn5 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4919 Hi my name is Crystal from Edmonton, Alberta and we seem to have a fly invasion within the house over the past month. This is a dead one taken with a 60x "microscope" lens over my camera. Hopefully you can identify as they are very small about .5-1 mm and thus hard to capture. They don't respond to fly bait such as sticky ribbon or sugar water. I haven't tried apple cider vinegar trap as from this picture it doesn't seem to be a fruit fly nor do they congregate in kitchen, mostly downstairs.  They also tend to stick low to the ground and found throughout house. From observing this photo they appear to have two light coloured bands along slender body. I don't see the normal protruding fly eyes to side of head so i feel confused to what this is. Weather has been mildly warm at 17C and varying between raining and sunny throughout this month. Thank you.
This fly appears to be in the superfamily Sciaroidea (fungus gnats and gall midges), but I can’t tell much more from this image. Basically harmless nuisance pests when they occur indoors. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4918  Hello. This is a photo of an unidentified bug found in my friends home in Woodstock Ontario. It is summer here so it is fairly hot outside, about 28 .. I'm not a fan of bugs and have goose bumps and chills everywhere .. please tell me what this is !!!!
This is a stag beetle (Coleoptera: Lucanidae); it looks like a male Ceruchus piceus - see
http://tinyurl.com/nmnc7cf for images and more information. They are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4917  I live in Corpus Christi, Texas and I just recently opened up my swimming pool for the summer. These insects are in my swimming pool. I cant find an identification for them. Please help.
This is a larva of an aquatic beetle, maybe in the family Hydrophilidae (water scavenger beetles), see
http://tinyurl.com/mkco9xr for an example. These larvae feed on other small aquatic organisms, and are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4916  We found a bug in our house and would like to know what it is. Hope you can help us. Thank you.  Don and Darlene. Edmonton, Alberta
This is a larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), a cosmopolitan species that can be a pantry pest.  Because their larvae will feed on such a wide variety of organic materials, complete control can be difficult. See
http://tinyurl.com/p7zqooo for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4915  Bat bugs or bed bugs?  For several years, we had a small number of bats (< dozen) overwinter in our condo townhouse attic (an issue with multiple units), we don't think they survived last winter (very cold in Toronto).   Last week when we woke up (7 AM) there was an insect on the top of the bed, under a ceiling fan which is just below the attic. Caught it, put it in alcohol. Though it looks to the naked eye like a bed bug (first we would have had in 25 years living here), a close look with a magnifying glass shows longer hairs on the upper thorax, so perhaps it's actually a bat bug. Reluctant to climb up into the attic to have a look, but we think this might have crawled into the ceiling electrical box for the fan and then fallen down on the bed. My husband used his SLR to get these close-ups. The hairs on the upper thorax seem as long as the width of the eye, implying a bat bug.. We inspected the bed covers, sheets, mattress and box spring VERY carefully, with no signs of any bed bugs at all, we've set some sticky traps under the bed as a precaution.  Any experts out there willing to hazard an educated guess before we call in the exterminator? Thanks, Karen in Toronto.
Looks as if you’ve done your homework well, as this appears more likely to be a bat bug than a bed bug   see http://tinyurl.com/of8te8g and http://tinyurl.com/ygpks6s for comparisons. See http://tinyurl.com/nu7cupj for detailed information on bat bugs, and, if you have not already come across it during your searches, this is about the best overall pub on bed bugs that I have seen: http://tinyurl.com/kv7j744    Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4914  Hello , my name is Andrew and I live in Ontario Canada . One night in the bathroom I found this bug which to me looks like a cockroach , just wanted to know if it was , and what species , thanks !
This is indeed a cockroach, apparently a nymph, but I cannot determine the species. It does not appear to be any of the peridomestic household pest species. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4913  South of Edmonton Alberta. Just had two inches of rain after a long dry spell. this critter was the plant  leaf in a fairly damp .... lots of new larkspur in area but lots of sunshine. Is it harmful? Thank you.  Suzan. 
This is a twice-stabbed stink bug, Cosmopepla lintneriana (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae). Although they will feed on a wide variety of plants (see http://tinyurl.com/2b4lrna), they do not appear to be serious pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4912 This was floating in a dish in my sink today. Quite significant (to me) in size ... Approx 1.5 - 2inches. - looks kind of shrimp-like.  Think we have seen another on the floor the same day and it was fast ( it got away so cannot give more info). Not sure if relevant but we are in the midst of renovations and have torn out our kitchen and flooring.  June 2014 in Ontario Canada. Thanks.  SA
This is a house centipede, Scutigera coleoptrata, a cosmopolitan species often found in buildings where they actively hunt down other arthropods, primarily insects. Reportedly, they can inflict a painful but not dangerous bite if mishandled, See http://tinyurl.com/mn7mzf for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4911 Hi,  This is a spider in our home.  My name is Diane.  We live in Saint-Hubert, Quebec.  Thumb size spider, June, rainy spring, indoors, and late at night. Thank you,  Diane
Like no. 4908, this is an eastern parson spider, Herpyllus ecclesiasticus.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4910  Found in a box in our warehouse. We have products coming in from all over (Asia, Mexico, U.S.) and have no way to identify where this may have originated (could be local).  Thanks.  Colleen. Senior Analyst, EHS (Environmental, Health & Safety)
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), but without knowing your geographic location, I cannot hazard a guess as to its being a local species or not.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4909  Good evening, I'm trying to identify this bug. The photo was taken June 21 and it's indoors. The pests seem to be mostly concentrating in two areas, near the pantry in the kitchen, and near the main entrance to the house. I'm located in Kitchener, Ontario.  Any help you can provide is greatly appreciated. Cheers,  Nik
The overall configuration of this beetle, including its shortened elytra (wing covers) exposing its abdomen appears consistent with it being a pea or bean weevil (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae; subfamily Bruchinae) - see http://tinyurl.com/lgpcra3 for an example. If you have any dry legume seeds or other whole grains stored in your pantry, check for signs of insect damage.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4908 Hello, I found this spider in our bathroom last month. I haven't been able to identify it and just wanted to be sure it wasn't harmful. I've seen a couple of these in the house and garage since then. They haven't bothered us yet so I haven't killed any. They are quite large though (about the size of a quarter, maybe bigger) and have a silvery strip on their backs. We live near Merrickville, Ontario, Canada.  Thanks! Chantel
This is a ground spider (family Gnaphosidae; it looks like a very gravid eastern parson spider, Herpyllus ecclesiasticus - see http://tinyurl.com/qeo7f for an image of a slimmer specimen. They are not dangerous to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4907  Hi there, I found this spider in my yard in Sundre, Alberta.  I'm wondering if it's dangerous for my kids. Ben.
This is a jumping spider (family Salticidae) in the genus Phidippus; likely P. borealis   see http://tinyurl.com/octgz2d for an image. They are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4906  Hello, My name is Annette,  We are located in Sechelt, BC. I have attached a photo of one of the bugs on our decking railing. The bugs are small, only about 2mm long. They move quickly and jump too. They first appeared last summer, disappeared during the winter then came back in April.  There seem to be more and more every day. They seem to come out late afternoon and in the evenings.  We have had the plants on the decking treated last week (Clematis) as they are suckling the life out of my leaves.  But this has not helped.  There are smaller ones too.  We are looking to identify them so that we can get rid of them. Please help! Thanks.
This is a springtail, a primitive arthropod in the order Collembola. The vast majority of springtails, such as your specimen, are harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter. The only species known to be serious pests on vegetation are in the family Sminthuridae which look very much different from your specimen - see
http://tinyurl.com/jwbpdnn for an example. Springtails need abundant moisture/high humidity in order to thrive, so moisture management is the best control. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4905  What are these bugs we found them on our tree in front of our house.  Brett.
These are insects in the order Psocodea (formerly placed in Psocoptera) known as barklice or tree cattle. They are harmless scavengers on bits or organic detritus in bark crevices. See
http://tinyurl.com/n6zqxgf for more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4904  I'm from Odessa , TX . I've found many of these in my house. I've googled and still can't find what the name of this bug is. I'm very worried that it is poisonous.  Amanda
This is an arachnid in the order Solifugae; they go by a variety of common names, including camel spiders, solifugids, solpugids, wind scorpions, and sun spiders. They are not venomous, but have very strong jaws that can deliver a painful bite if mishandled. See
http://tinyurl.com/kpr8njo for more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4903  Hello!  I have been finding these little beetles inside our house in Pelham, ON.  Roughly 5-7 mm long. They appear at night in a well-lit hallway near a cold-air return vent, a dry goods pantry and a linen closet, usually in batches of 4-5.  I'd love to know if they are here for the food, the wood, or something else. Thank you in advance for your help. Great website!  Andrew
This is a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae). The vast majority of the species in this very large family are general predators on other small arthropods and thus usually considered beneficial. However, as in any large family, there are exceptions, and a few species can be pests by feeding on sprouting seeds; see
http://tinyurl.com/pxa9f5z for a couple of examples. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4902  I have ants in my back yard . These ants are coming out of concrete pavement and are not present in the wooden deck or other wood around outside of my home in Calgary. But if look at the pics they look like as carpenter ants but I am bit confused because they are away from wood and also I don't see saw dust. I bought this house two years ago in winter 2011 and in spring 2012 I noticed these ants in my back yard.  We replaced the old deck as wood was rotten mainly due to poor material and improper drainage of water and did not see any ant in the rotten wood. Best regards, Azaz
This is not a carpenter ant (Camponotus sp.), it looks more like a Formica sp. -  see
http://tinyurl.com/mkll9e7 for an example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4901 Hi there, I found this little guy on the back of my neck after hanging some laundry underneath our line tree. We are located in British Columbia Canada in the Okanagan Valley. The insect is approximately 1 cm long (at most) and it is the beginning of June. Would really appreciate your help! I tried to find other pictures but couldn't manage. Thanks.  Wes
This appears to be a larva of a green lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), both larvae and adult lacewings are voracious predators on small soft-bodied insects such as aphids and caterpillars, and thus usually considered as beneficial. See
http://tinyurl.com/lrzpkr6 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

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