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I just want to thank you for providing such a good resource for bug identification!! I searched and googled and searched over and over again for help identifying a hard shell worm/beetle infest, and thankfully I finally found your website!!!!!  It seems one out of ten questions is on the same pest as I have, but, it was very hard to find anything on it at all.  You provided detailed information, actual pictures to look at, and other recourses to search on the pest. This is greatly appreciated. Many thanks to  Ed Saugstad for offering opinion and providing  info (over and over again, it seems to be a popular pest) I am so happy to finally find something useful and direct to the point.  Many thanks to you!!!!   Glenda from Minnesota

 

Hi, 
I just wanted to say. Your website is amazing! I visit it so often that I've recommended it to others too. It is clear that no other website can compare to it. And does Ed Saugstad help with the website too? He pretty much answers everyone's questions and if it's just a hobby of his to answer bug questions for others then he's amazing too. Big thanks to you and Ed for keeping the website alive.
 Cheers!
Christine

Dearest Mr. Cross
I live in Mass. and have been terrified that I have been getting kissing bugs and have even contacted the CDC then I stumbled on to your site and began searching.  After over one hundred bugs later I found the Western conifer seed bug and I began to breath again.  Thank you so much for this site.  It is a true blessing.
Sincerely
Martha

 

THANK YOU!  I tried over a dozen bug ID sites.  None were as helpful as yours.  We ID'ed "our" bug based on your response to someone from Manchester, England. The Drugstore beetle was a match.  The hint about dog food and sry goods helped us find the infestation in the dog bisuits.  We have been finding them all over the house, but mostly on light colored surfaces or near lighting fixtures in the evening.  I feel so much better having figured this out, which I could not have done without your site. THANK YOU!
Katy

 

Thank you for maintaining this fabulously informative web site and thanks also to Ed Saugstad the retired entomologist, who replies with such useful information so freely!  It is all very much appreciated. Sandra. Quinte West, Ontario. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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What is this pest?
 Submit a high quality photo of any pest you would like identified. 
Hopefully one of our visitors will be able to identify them.  
 
How to send your photos. 

The pictures below have been submitted by visitors.  If you can identify them you are invited to send us your answers. Your description  is also encouraged.  Please Include the picture number with your answers.  

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Click on the photos to enlarge.  They are usually much clearer.

 
5329  This little guy is just in one room the back bedroom. The ones I am finding are not alive. I live in North eastern Alberta. I found them last year through out the spring and summer and then they disappeared. Now they are back. I did some investigating and found them under the bed. Also have found a few on top of the bed. Mostly on the floor.  It might be 1/4 inch long at the most. And some are paler looking. Thank you again Doris. 
5328  Hello,  I live in Kansas,  found these on my popcorn textured ceiling in my living room a few hours later they were gone.  But found smaller group in my daughter's bedroom. They are very small and I think the round ones may be eggs,  they move around with the white clear part. They were hanging down from the ceiling.
5327 My name is Victoria.   I live in St. George Brant Ontario Canada. I found this crawling on my leg today.  I had long pants on all day.  
5326 I'm really hoping you can help me. I keep finding these the last few months in my home sometimes on my curtains or bedding but mainly in the cracks between my hardwood. It's April and I live in Chestermere, AB. Thank you for your time!
5325  I just found this huge beetle in my pond at night. I have lived in Washington state all my life and have never seen a beetle this size and in water. It was close to 3 inches long and about an inch wide. Any info on what this could be will be greatly appreciated. Thanks.  Tammy
5324  I found this on my door this morning. Have no clue what it is. Was hoping y'all could help. I live about 45 miles south east of Dallas, Texas. Its about 2 1/2 to 3 inches long. Thanks! 
5323  Hi, found this at the cottage in our bedroom and friend is worried that it's a tic.
This is a male hard tick (family Ixodidae), possibly Ixodes ricinis; see http://tinyurl.com/mfkcfj7 for an image. Ed Saugstad, Retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5322 Not sure it is a pest per se but want to identify. Slug like creature found in pond May 2015. Lakefield Ontario (just north of Peterborough).  Thanks Emma
This is another one that has me scratching my head - I feel that I should be able to pin a name on it, but nothing burbles to the surface. It would help to see images that clearly show its underside and its head, and I would like to know its approximate size. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5321 Hi!  I live near Windsor nova Scotia.   Found a few of these by my wooden deck on a gorgeous +21 degree Celsius sunny day on may 15th, 2015.  Just wondering what it is. . We haven't lived here too long. Thanks a bunch! Allison
- This is a larva of a firefly (Coleoptera: Lampyridae); see
http://tinyurl.com/mmod27k for an image. These are predatory on other small arthropods, mainly other insects. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5320  Hello! We found this little guy yesterday, here in Arequipa, Peru. To get an idea of scale, he could fit on a penny. I got a few pics before he flew away, and this is the best one. The narrow wings angle back and remind me of a wasp. The body can be fairly straight, or can be curled up over the body like a scorpion, as in the picture. It looks kinda scary, but seemed to be harmless.  Regards, Scott 
This actually is a tiny moth, it belongs to an artificial assemblage of families known collectively as microlepidoptera. Only a specialist in this grouping (and I definitely am not one) would be able to provide a definitive identification. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5319 This large flying insect was spotted at the Colca Canyon in southern Peru, in the month of June. It was as large as a very large bumble bee, and made a lot of noise as it hovered along next to us. It's pictured here on my friend's leg, as it was poking around with it's long needle-like proboscis.  Scott
This is a bee fly, Diptera: Bombyliidae; they are parasitic on ground-nesting bees and wasps and are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5318  Hello. My name is Diana. We live in  Gulfport, MS. We moved in this house 3 years ago. I have seen this bug almost every year but before I did not get do concern since they were not to many nor lasted for a long time. It is the middle of May. The weather is hot and humid.   I found more then 50 of these little bugs crawling all over my bathroom. They are light brown color with dark brown head and 6 legs and two straight antennas. They move kinda fast and have long bodies. 2 or 3 of them had wings but the majority didn't. They do not bleed when killed. I think they were coming in through the bathroom light.  Does any body knows what they are and do I need to be worried? Thank you in advance.
Iím afraid that you have an active termite infestation, these are reproductive caste termites (swarmers) that have shed their wings and now are seeking mates before setting up new colonies. You may wish to consult a professional termite control company - see
http://tinyurl.com/lc6f6pp for a starting point. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5317 Found in garden setting, on leaf of shrub in Va. Beach, VA, fall 2014.  About ĹĒ
This is a beneficial stink bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomida), it is Euthyrhynchus floridanus, known as the Florida predatory stink bug; see http://tinyurl.com/nceed6 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5316 I am wondering if this is a Carpenter Ant or something less harmful to my home...  Aaron.  Surrey, BC.
On the weekend you submitted your photo there was a major swarm of Modoc species carpenter ants on the west coast of BC.  This looks like a reproductive female that has been fertilized and removed her wings. See this page for more photos: http://www.pestcontrolcanada.com/carpenter_ant_photos.htm
5315  My name is Jenn I live in southern Ontario and this is the 3rd of it's kind in my home this week.
This is Platycryptus undatus, a jumping spider (family Salticidae); see
http://tinyurl.com/kpocual for images and more detailed information. All jumping spiders are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5314 This was taken in Mount Albert, ON on May 10, 2015. Second sighting in two week period. Very hot, sunny days. It is about one inch or slightly longer.  Thank you.  Andrea
This is a blister beetle (Coleoptera: Meloidae) in the genus Meloe. Beetles in this genus sometimes are called oil beetles because of the oily fluid they exude from their joints when handled roughly. This fluid contains a chemical, cantharidin, that can cause blisters on tender skin. See
http://tinyurl.com/k237k24 for an image and more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5313 My name is Gloria.  I live in South Texas.  I noticed this bug about 3 months ago on my porch and when I water my lawn, they crawl up to the porch and of course I step on them.  I thought maybe I didnít have that many, but while I was pulling a couple weeds in my backyard I also found them under the leaves. The leaves had a web look to them because they are eating the greenery.  The baby ones have a brownish look to them, the majority of the ones that I have found crawling on the porch are the yellowish color with black lines and also found I would guess older ones that have a white color with black lines. During a BBQ, I felt like a burning sensation or a bite and when I looked down, one of these bugs was on my leg.  How much damage if any will this bug do to my lawn and trees? Size:  maybe ĹĒ long Ė 1/4Ē wide.  Month:  May.  Weather conditions:  Raining off and on Ė humid, cool nights / warm days about 78 degrees.  Found outdoors only.
This is a larva of a wild olive tortoise beetle, Physonota alutacea (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae); see http://tinyurl.com/mhhz8sw for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5312  The bug in the photo lives indoors and tend to be more active at night. This one was amongst damp towels in my daughter's bathroom when I found it. They show up ever year in the spring and are not seen once it gets cold in the fall. There is a newborn in the house now and I would like to know if there should be extra effort put in to try and get rid of them.  Thanks! Michelle 
This is a silverfish, Lepisma saccharina (Zygentoma: Lepismatidae), a very common peridomestic nuisance pest along with its close cousin, the firebrat. See
http://tinyurl.com/mc5vk7j for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5311  I live in a basement apartment in Guelph, Ontario. Found this spider in my kitchen, and also found other 2, one in the bathroom and other in the living room. They are the size a 2 dollars ' coin and all had this interesting sign. Thank you, Aline. 
This appears to be a hacklemesh weaver (family Amaurobiidae) in the genus Amaurobius; see
http://tinyurl.com/opx3vtu for an image and http://tinyurl.com/kwhdm6c for more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5310 I live near Edmonton and I found many of these under a pile of clothes taken out of the dryer a few hours earlier.  Pictures taken with a grain of rice for size comparison.  Can not find them anywhere else in the house.
The image is not clear enough for me to be certain, but it could be a larva of a dermestid beetle (carpet/hide/skin/larder beetles, etc.) in the genus Attagenus or Dermestes. Just in case, see
http://tinyurl.com/3jwyyt9 for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5309 I found this in the dirt up on Maple mountain, north Cowichan (Vancouver island B.C.) April.  It was about 1 1/2".  (We were building trails, so we accidentally dug up the spider)
This appears to be a female Antrodiaetus pacificus, a folding-door trapdoor spider (family Antrodiaetidae); see
http://tinyurl.com/lp7j62z for an image. Males of this species are more commonly seen tan females, as they wander about in search of mates while the females pretty much stay in their burrows. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5308  Good morning, This pest first appeared a week ago in our ensuite. At first there were just a couple - no big deal - but then they started to become a nuisance. We have killed about 20 a day, mostly in the ensuite but we found a few in our living room which is quite some distance from  our bedroom. They are very tiny - perhaps 1/8 of an inch long(maximum) and appear black and are crunchy like a beetle when you squeeze them. They walk around and have not trouble apparently scaling a wall, or going up curtains (as in living room). Your help in providing identification and suggestions for a solution would be much appreciated. Regards.  Chris
This weevilís size and shape are consistent with that of grain/granary weevils in the genus Sitophilus, see
http://tinyurl.com/p84mx3g for an example and http://tinyurl.com/cff3o6r for some control suggestions. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5307  I found these in a wash bucket in my basement laundry area. I live in Ontario, Canada. Along with this guy (alive) there was one dead and the bucket was full of black specs, a couple moving so I'm assuming they were all larvae, or maybe a mix of larvae and waste? The specs are also all over the wooden cupboard. The larger ones are still quite small, maybe a millimetre, not quite two. Hoping you can help.  Thank you, Amanda
This appears to be a spider beetle (Coleoptera: Anobiidae; subfamily Ptininae), but I am uncertain as to its specific identity. Spider beetles usually are nuisance pests as they will feed on a wide variety of organic materials. Occasionally, they may become pantry pests. See
http://tinyurl.com/mamup5 for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations (Note: The image in this publication is not of the same species as yours). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5306 I photographed this spider resting on my garage door. It bears some resemblance to your photos of a Fishing Spider ( family Pisauridae), but I'm not sure that's what it is. Photo date & time: 4 May 2015; 4:19 p.m.  Place: southern Adirondack Mts. of New York State. Any help getting it IDed to family, or to genus, or to species would be appreciated.  Thanks, Ed
This is a running crab spider (family Philodromidae) in the genus Philodromus, see http://tinyurl.com/n4j2m77 for another example. They are harmless to humans, and may be distinguished from other similar-appearing spiders by always having their second pair of legs longer than the others. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5305  Hi,  We have this insect in our house. Halifax Nova Scotia. We had some last summer in our kitchen cupboard and now it seems we have them everywhere in our house. Bathroom. Light fixture. Bedrooms. Etc.  It looks like larder beetle from your website. Should I need to have someone to get rid of them? Thanks in advance, Audrey. 
This is yet another larder beetle; see Nos. 5301 and 5302. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV

Thanks to Entomologist Ed for identifying so many of the bugs submitted to this site.
It is a great site and hope it continues to exist.  Very helpful.
Renate Auktor

5304 We live in a rural area of QC's Laurentian region surrounded by forests. We have a large screened-in-porch.  This past winter a bag with wool was put out there when moths were found. We though minus 20c would kill them. Apparently not. We have a very bad infestation which luckily so far has not entered our home. We have tried 3 different types of sprays with pyrethrins at 0.25% with some success but we have found no nests and no larvae. Everyday we vacuum up the 100's and 100's dead ones and apply more spray. Are these really clothes/wool moths? or are we treating for the wrong thing. These are about 1/4 inch long.  Last night we put the pheromone traps down but almost none came on them.   Some seem much darker than the others. We have been treating around woodwork and skirting boards.  Anne & David in Saint-Sauveur, QC.
These moths belong to an artificial grouping of several families known collectively as microlepidoptera; I suspect that these may be in the superfamily Gracillarioidea, and thus extremely unlikely to be household pests of any kind. Pheromone traps are designed to attract only the species who give off that particular pheromone, so if you were using clothes moth traps, it is not at all surprising that none of these moths were attracted to them. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5303  Spotted sucking sap from cut off maple stump. Late April, southern Ontario. About the size of three or four peas. Fuzzy. Clung tightly to the stump.
This is a flower scarab beetle in the genus Euphoria, likely Euphoria inda, known as the bumble flower beetle. This species feds primarily on plant tissues that have already been damaged, and do not appear to cause any harm itself. See
http://tinyurl.com/psemnn7 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5302  Found this in my house in Victoria ...British Columbia... Canada. What is it and can it attack humans. As my girlfriend has bites on her. Thought they were spider bites.
This is another larder beetle (see No. 5301) that looks as if it has been sprayed with some liquid. They would be extremely unlikely to bite humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5301  Michelle from Regina, SK.  I just moved into an older house and I keep finding these little beetle like insects on the carpet.
This is Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), commonly known as the larder beetle or bacon beetle. See
http://tinyurl.com/p7zqooo for more detailed information; they can infest a wide variety of food items. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5300 What type of spider is this? My dad and i found this and many others in a well on my grandmothers farm, in Ladysmith, BC.  I'm taking biology and I'm pretty curious.  Never seen one like it before. Thanks, Danae.
This is a woodlouse spider, Dysdera crocata. These spiders specialize in preying upon woodlice/sowbugs (crustaceans in the order Isopoda), and they have very large chelicerae (Ďjawsí) for their size that enable them to pierce the tough exoskeletons of their prey. They also can deliver a very painful bite if mishandled. See
http://tinyurl.com/6sjaczh for additional information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5299  Hi, my boyfriend and I were digging up a garden to plant flowers  that had since grassed over and we found this. I would say it is about 2cm - 3cm but it is hard to tell while he was curled up. I have looked online and have not found a proper identification for it. Some say it is larvae for bot flies or other insects, some say it is just a simple garden grub. I found several of them of all different sizes but have never seen them before. I decided to toss it back in the garden and the next day it was gone. I live in Oshawa, ON and I am wondering if this bug will affect any of the flowers in our garden and if we should find elsewhere to plant them? Thank you for any information you can provide us with.  Katie
This is a larva (grub) of a beetle in the family Scarabaeidae. The larvae of some species, such as Japanese beetles and May beetles/June bugs can be serious lawn/turf pests as they feed primarily on the roots of grasses just below the soil surface. Some are scavengers on decomposing organic matter in the soil while others feed in/on the dung of various animals. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5298 Hello, please help us identify this bug in our finished basement. It is spring time now, but these critters have been with us for the past three months or so. And now they are proliferating.  We have looked for signs of a nest and / or source of habitat (moisture), but none found. Thank you!   Dale
This is an odd little millipede known as a duff millipede (Polyxenida: Polyxenidae). They do no damage, and at worst may be considered nuisance pests; specific control measures are not necessary. For more detailed information, see
http://tinyurl.com/yg9jr5a Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5297  Good day, I live in Rockford IL, 70 miles NW of Chicago.  These ladybug-looking bugs have been inside all winter.  Many times in the morning, we will find a few live ones on the windows and sills, and up to a dozen dead ones on the floor under the windows.  Mainly on the East facing windows.  Seems to be more of them the colder it has been outside the night before.  They are not attracted to us, but are a really big pain, since they leave brown spots the size of a pinhead on our white curtains.  We built this house 27 years ago, and have never had an infestation of any critter - till this past winter.  Please ID and offer method to be rid of them for good.  Thanks. Roy
These are Asian multi-colored lady beetles, Harmonia axyridis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). They often become nuisance pests because of their habit of entering buildings, especially during autumn when they seek winter shelter. See http://tinyurl.com/p6c47h7 for some suggestions for dealing with them. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5296  Used white soap water under light to attract bugs and found this indoors in home in San Francisco this morning. Had experienced 2 ankle bite 3 days ago but haven't felt anything since. Is this a flea?  Sherry
About the only thing that I can tell you from this image is that it is not a flea. Clearer images of its top (dorsal), side (lateral) and front (head end) along with an estimate of its size would help. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5295 Regarding photo 5278 that Mr Ed Saugstad kindly replied to. Attached an additional picture of the beetle I have found in the window sills. My kids are getting large red welts which from what I have read about are caused by the larvae??? I am flipping out and have thrown out the carpet and vacuumed the place like a crazy. Can you please let me know what they would be and how I can make sure I get rid of them? Thank you so much.
I cannot tell for certain whether this is a carpet beetle (family Dermestidae, see
http://tinyurl.com/peesjfr for an example) or possibly a cigarette/drugstore beetle (family Anobiidae, see http://tinyurl.com/7eyt2ra). In either case, I believe that it is very unlikely that they would be responsible for the skin lesions, as medical reports indicate that sensitivity to carpet beetle larval hairs that results in dermatitis requires long-term (years) exposure. However, it wouldnít hurt to consult a physician, particularly a dermatologist/allergist for an opinion. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5294 These were caught on the sticky pad that my pest pro had laid around the house.  This particular one was in my basement closet and I had one actually crawling on my leg not too long ago;   I live about 35 miles North of Nashville.  I try to get as much information as I can when I see a new bug, mainly because I want to know if it can harm me or my pet.  Sincerely,  Patty
These are small weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) of some sort; the only ones that would be of any concern would be grain/granary weevils in the genus Sitophilus, as these can become pests of stored grains, such as wheat, rice, or corn (maize). Just in case, see http://tinyurl.com/bw2oa8f for an example and http://tinyurl.com/cff3o6r for some control suggestions. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5293 Hi there, located in Mayerthorpe Alberta Canada. Our back pasture has standing water where existing mosquito larvae are flourishing. Our daughters found these curious creatures in with them. I hope the video plays as they have very unique "centipede type" legs they use for swimming. They can move very fast if provoked. Posted locally to see if anyone knew what they were and got a number of incorrect answers. Hoping for better results here :)  Theresa
This is a crustacean in the order Anostraca known as a fairy shrimp. They are most often seen in ephemeral pools shortly after snowmelt in the spring; I often saw them in pools on our farm in North Dakota. See
http://tinyurl.com/m23f7aj and http://tinyurl.com/m23f7aj for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5292  Vancouver Island, BC. Late march/early April. Likes to fly into eyes, nose, mouths of humans and horses.
I would like to see clearer images of this fly before attempting an identification, particularly a dorsal view showing all the wing veins and the head, and a lateral view showing all the legs. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5291 Hi there,  I found a few of these bugs in my house and garden the last few days. Any idea what they are? I live in Vancouver BC. 
This is a giant stonefly (Plecoptera: Pteronarcyidae) in the genus Pteronarcys; see
http://tinyurl.com/pfze5yw for an image. Also commonly known as salmonflies, they spend most of their life as aquatic nymphs in streams, the adults living just long enough to find mates and lay eggs. See http://tinyurl.com/6peu7u for more information on their biology. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5290  Fantastic website!  I live in Calgary and have recently (April) noticed these worm like larvae in my main floor family room.  I suspect they are coming from my ceiling joists, crawling out from the pot light cracks.  Some have fallen to the floor.  I can add that last summer I had a wasp nest (still in place) in the same joist space.  I would appreciate any help in identifying the bug and any thoughts on whether any wasp decay may be causing the problem.  Thanks kindly. Dennis L.
Although I am by no means certain, this could be a larva of a carpet beetle in the genus Attagenus or Dermestes; see
http://tinyurl.com/ll5544c and http://tinyurl.com/mysvkcs for examples. These insects will feed on a very wide variety of organic  materials, including accumulations of dead insects such as may be found in old light fixtures or behind baseboards. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5289  These are all over my Leyland Cypress trees.  Can you help me identify what they are and how to control them please.  We live in southern Maryland, USA.  thank you!
This is a gall formed by Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae, causative agent of cedar-apple rust. It has a rather complex life history, that involves two hosts (trees belonging to the apple and cedar families and four different spore stages. For detailed information, see http://tinyurl.com/qjnmlfg. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5288  This insect was discovered walking across the bedroom floor this morning. It is about 10 to 12 mm long. We live in North Glengarry county in Eastern Ontario. We have never seen anything like this before, either indoors or outdoors. It appears to have some bed bug characteristics but seems too large. It doesn't appear to have wings. Any idea? Should we be concerned?  Thanks ... Jay-Dee
This is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae); it appears to be Reduvius personatus, a peridomestic species known as the masked hunter. The nymphs often attach bits of debris to their body hairs in an apparent attempt to camouflage themselves. They are reported to have an extremely painful bite, and should be treated with caution. See no. 4434 for an example of an adult and http://tinyurl.com/mwq56m for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Looks like the nymph of an assassin bug.  They inhabit dwellings and outbuildings and eat insects, especially bedbugs (but their presence is not an indication that you have bedbugs!)  The nymph stage covers its body with dust and debris, perhaps as a camouflage.
Gini.  Nova Scotia
5287 Can you identify this bug? It looks like a tick but it has kind of a metallic green body with orange legs. I live in West Texas. I found it on the door frame of my back door.--S.H.
I cannot tell for certain what this might be from the image provided; it could be a mite or an immature tick. If it was very small (less than a millimeter), a clover mite would be a possibility - see
http://tinyurl.com/lmzohcs for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5286 I found these bugs crawling all around my basement floor, in Mississauga, Ontario. They are really tiny, and you don't notice them unless you're crouched near the floor, and they're moving.  When they are disturbed, they jump, and they are smaller than the size of a pin head. George
These are booklice (Psocodea: Liposcelidae). They basically are nuisance pests that thrive best under damp/humid conditions, feeding mainly on mold spores and bits of organic debris, but they sometimes will attack starchy materials such as book bindings. See http://tinyurl.com/mjydktu for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5285  Large dark beetle, active at night.  Location: Kitimat, BC, Canada
Like No. 5280, thus is a predaceous diving beetle (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) in the genus Dytiscus; perhaps D. marginicollis, see
http://tinyurl.com/ovcmmp6 for images. It also is a male, as can be seen by the disc-like expansion of its front tarsi. The male uses these to keep a grip on a female during mating. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5284 Found when it dropped into my yard April 17 St Bruno , Quebec
This is a giant water bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Belostomatidae); aka toe biter or electric light bug. They are predators on other aquatic life, primarily other insects, but also sometimes minnows and tadpoles. They have very powerful enzymes in their saliva that serve to break down the tissues of their prey and that also causes the severe pain associated with their bite. Also, they are strong fliers and can be found quite some distance from water. See 
http://tinyurl.com/qg3ah82 for an image and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5283 Karen from Seneca SC took these photos of what appear to be baby spiders but I am not sure what they are.  The cluster of cells that appears to be a nest is a little smaller than a quarter.  They are on the siding on my house on a covered deck.  I think these spiders or whatever they are have a parasite using them as a host. Karen P.
These are the eggs and newly hatched nymphs of Arilus cristatus, an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as a wheel bug because of the cogwheel-like crest seen on the thorax of the adult insect. These are voracious predators on other arthropods, mainly other insects, and can deliver a very painful Ďbiteí if mishandled. See
http://tinyurl.com/r3jvp7 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5282 Hi, my name is Rafael and I live in Toronto, Canada and my house is close to lake Ontario and is been raining everyday and the temperature ranges from 10 to -1 C this week. This picture was taken today outside my house. I started to notice a few over the weekend, but now there are hundreds covering the front of my house (it almost looks like I have painted the front of the house with a blackish color). I would like to know what time of insect this is. Please help! Thank you in advance.
This is a male non-biting midge (Diptera: Chironomidae). These certainly can be nuisance pests, but there is little that can be done in way of control as their potential breeding habitats are very extensive and diffuse. Fortunately, these Ďoutbreaksí seldom last for very long. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5281  Hello, Iím fairly certain this is a female tarantuloid (Antrodiaetus pugnax), but am hoping you can confirm. I found it outdoors in Kelowna, BC (central Okanagan Valley). It was on the lawn, during some nice spring weather (April 23rd), trying to hide itself by burrowing into the grass. It had a very distinct ďtarantula-likeĒ movement and was about the size of a nickel (legs included). Thanks! Alicia
This certainly could be Antrodiaetus pugnax; however there are three other species in this genus reported from British Columbia, and some specimens of at least one of those, A. pacificus, can be so similar in appearance that I would hesitate to differentiate them on images alone. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5280 Large quarter sized beetle, too small for giant water bug, doesn't seem like a June bug.  This fellow flew down to the road from the skies of Hamilton after today's nice spring day.  Nathaniel.
This is a predaceous diving beetle (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae) in the genus Dytiscus - see
http://tinyurl.com/q4z86rl for an example. These beetles as well as their larvae (also aquatic, and often called Ďwater tigersí) are voracious predator on other small aquatic life forms, usually other insects, but also occasionally small minnows or tadpoles. They also are strong fliers, and may be found quite some distance from water. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WVa
5279  Found in my vehicle on Vancouver Island.  Never seen this spider before.  Thank you.  Cory
This is Misumena vatia, commonly known as the goldenrod crab spider. Crab spiders (family Thomisidae) are ambush predators, lying in wait on vegetation (often in flowers) for a potential meal to venture within nabbing distance. This species is unusual in having the ability to gradually change its colour to match its background. See
http://tinyurl.com/lr79py for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WVa
5278  I found a few of these in my window sill. Panicked that they were bedbugs but since they have wings I think no? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you. C.
About all that I can tell you from this image is that it is a beetle and that it does not appear to be any of the types that can be household pests. If you find another, please submit an image that shows the entire dorsal view. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WVa
5277 What a great service this is!  These guys have started appearing in increasing numbers the last couple days in my Vancouver home.  Based on other photos, I am going to guess it's a weevil?  Interestingly, a few of them have seemed dead and then suddenly start moving only to curl up and freeze again.  They also appear to have an amazing ability to hang on.  I tried to push it off the paper I had it on and had to try a few times.  Even if it is harmless, are there any methods to get rid of them?  My daughter is terrified of all insects and it's been all I can do to run around and deal with these before she sees them.  Thanks,  Cathy
This is indeed a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); specifically, it is a broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil in the subfamily Entiminae. Weevils in this subfamily often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there; and short of hermetically sealing your home, there is virtually no way that you can completely exclude them. I can only suggest vacuuming them up as you see them, and try your best to teach your daughter that the vast majority of insects not only are harmless, but many can be quite helpful. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WVa
5276  Mike.  London, Ontario.  2mm in length.  Caught today inside.
I am (temporarily, at least) stumped by this one. Before I enlarged the image, I thought that it would prove to be a winged aphid, but once I took a closer look, I could see that it appeared to be a tiny fly of some sort. I will return to this one when I have more time. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5275 We have been finding these holes throughout our treed area and are wondering what is making them.  Thank you,  Charity Hagen,  Red Deer County, AB
This looks like typical woodpecker damage, caused by their efforts to get at insects tunneling in the tree. See http://tinyurl.com/n588zqm for another example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
                            
5274   I would like to have an id of this spider.  Thank you.  Steve.
This spider is in the family Gnaphosidae (ground spiders); it looks like one of the so-called ant mimics in the genus Sergiolus, see
http://tinyurl.com/nlzrnux for an example (may not be the same exact species as yours). All of these spiders are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5273  My name is Irwin.  I live in Sarasota, FL, where pests of all sorts are always trying to invade my space.  These small (3-5 mm) moths get active each evening flying wherever there is a light.  In addition, I have removed a few case bearing insects from my walls working their way up from the carpeting.  I suspect they represent a different life form of the same insect.  I have lifted the carpeting in those areas below the sites of the cases, vacuumed and sprayed before returning the carpeting.  No luck to date!  Attached are pictures of each.  I welcome any information you can give to identify these pests with guidance on where to look to remove them.  Thanks for providing such a valuable web site. Irwin
Your two submissions may be unrelated. Although they both might be in the family Tineidae, the case looks like that of an insect known as the household casebearer, Phereoeca uterella (Lepidoptera: Tineidae), see http://tinyurl.com/k9lpjfy for an image, but the moths do not look like the adults of that species (see http://tinyurl.com/qdnhrme for an image); rather they resemble adult webbing clothes moths, Tineola bisselliella (Lepidoptera: Tineidae), see http://tinyurl.com/phy6cyg for an image. Household casebearers seldom cause any real damage, as they seem to prefer dining on old spider webs and the like - see http://tinyurl.com/dn4jn5 for details. If you do have clothes moths you should see signs of their damage, see http://tinyurl.com/q7gyldq for an example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5272 Hi, my name is Jill. We live in South Western Ontario  on Lake Huron, I have seen a few bugs like this in our bathroom, they are quite small & seem to like the dark, they move quite fast if disturbed & if killed turn into or release sort of a grey powder, this picture makes it look as if it has a shell but they in actuality do not appear to have a hard one if at all... If you could Please help by telling me what kind it is!! Thank you! 
This is a silverfish, Lepisma saccharina (Zygentoma: Lepismatidae), a very common peridomestic nuisance pest along with its close cousin, the firebrat. See
http://tinyurl.com/mc5vk7j for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5271  I have an infestation of these in my pantry. They are very small and look like pale coffee grounds or dirt. They squish very easily. I cant figure out what they are!
This is a booklouse (Psocodea: Liposcelidae). They basically are nuisance pests that thrive best under damp/humid conditions, feeding mainly on mold spores and bits of organic debris, but they sometimes will attack starchy materials such as book bindings. See
http://tinyurl.com/mjydktu for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5270 Found these little bugs in the forest today underneath rotting bark. Never seen these things in Ontario before.
These are adults and nymphs of a flat bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Aradidae). In temperate zones, these bugs usually are found under or on the bark of dead trees, where some entomologists think that they feed on the fluids of fungi mycelium. Little appears known about the biology of many species in this family; see
http://tinyurl.com/n5uzwnb for images and a bit more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5269 Hi my name is Jennifer. We live in Minnesota just north of the twin cities. It is mid April so technically spring here. We have lived in this home for 9 years and never have seen these caterpillar type bugs before. We keep finding these caterpillar insects on our bathroom floor. Sometimes there are as many as five. They seem to be attracted to wet towels if we leave one on the floor. Our home is a ranch style house so we have no basement. The block is a little exposed in the bathroom in one spot. I seen one crawl out and then back in that area before I could grab it. What are they? What should we do to get rid of them?   Thanks much
This appears to be a caterpillar in the family Noctuidae; see
http://tinyurl.com/lzpcdf6 for an example (not the same species as yours). I am not aware of any of these being indoor pests, so I am at somewhat of a loss to explain their presence where you are finding them. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5268 Hi. My name is Steve. I found this in my compost pile. It is about 1 cm long. Found in early April in Victoria, BC, Canada. Weather here is about 10 Ė 12 degrees Celsius. My compost pile of course is quite warm. thanks.
This is a small dung beetle (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) in the genus Aphodius - see http://tinyurl.com/kf2qq4h for an image. These beetles usually are found beneath dung pats in open pastures. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5267  Hi, i just found this bug inside a pillow case in my bedroom. I am located in New Brunswick, Canada. It had a strip on its back. It didnít appear to have any wings. It was about 7mm in length? Is this a bed bug? should i be concerned there might be more?
Like no. 5366, this is another larder beetle. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5266  Hi,  I found this bug on my bathroom's floor in the basement. I live in Montreal. Thank You for your help!
This is Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), commonly known as the larder beetle or bacon beetle. See
http://tinyurl.com/p7zqooo for more detailed information; they can infest a wide variety of food items. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.


 

5265 Found on my synthťtique material desk in Paris, France in April 2015 - indoors, dry. It's about the size of a pin-head. I tried to enlarge it so you can see better.  Thank you. E. Cowgill
This appears to be a plant seed and not an insect or other arthropod. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5264 Hello,  I was hoping you can tell me what kind of bug I found in my living room this morning. It is grey and white, about 3/4 on an inch and looks almost like it has fur.  It is Spring in Southern Ontario. Thanks, Amanda 
This appears to be a bristletail known as a firebrat (Thermobia domestica; Zygentoma: Lepismatidae), a common peridomestic nuisance pest. See http://tinyurl.com/mc5vk7j for more detailed information, including control recommendations.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5263  The attached bug has been seen for the first time ever but twice within a 2-day period at our cottage home in Hastings County north of Belleville.  We just came up for the easter week. When not here, the home is kept to a temperature of 12-15  degrees C (so not very warm) and there are no moisture issues that we are aware of. One was found in the living room and the other in the bedroom; both carpeted areas.  The insect is 5/8Ē long approx (excluding antennae).  It looks like a cockroach but I am hoping it is not.  Help. Thanks.  M.
This is a nymph of a cockroach, it looks like one of the wood cockroaches in the genus Parcoblatta, see http://tinyurl.com/qdxls3v for an example. Although wood cockroaches often find their way indoors, they apparently are not in the habit of setting up housekeeping there, and thus usually are no more than nuisance pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5262  Found this in my garden digging up old tree. It was buried around 3 ft deep. It's approx 3inch long and the width of my ring finger. Thank you for your consideration in this.  Karin.  I live in Osoyoos, BC.
This is a larva of a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae. These larvae develop primarily in roots of trees, and some species can be serious pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5261  Good evening,  I found this ant with a stinger on my kitchen floor today.  Iím suspicious that it might be a fire ant and Iím not certain what else do to.  I have 2 kids and worried that more might be in the house.  Name: Manon. 
 Hammond,  Ontario.  Date: April, 2015.  Any advice on what it is and what I could do?  Thank you in advance. Manon
This is not an ant, but a wingless female ichneumon wasp in the genus Gelis, see
http://tinyurl.com/p5lrnzn for an image. All ichneumon wasps are parasites/parasitoids on other arthropods, mainly other insects. The Ďstingerí actually is its ovipositor, used to insert its eggs into its intended prey. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5260   Hi,  Paula from the Ottawa, Ontario.  Found this tiny little bug crawling in the basement Ė April 2015.   Because it is very small, I wanted to know if it is a bug that will multiply without noticing them. Thank you.
No need to worry about this one, it is a checkered beetle (Coleoptera: Cleridae); these are general predators on other small arthropods. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5259  Hi! This thing bit me tonight as I got into bed - and it really hurt!  Swollen up around the bite.  Looked everywhere on the internet, can't seem to figure out what it is.  From Peterborough, ON.  Thanks,  Nate
This is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae); it appears to be Reduvius personatus, a peridomestic species known as the masked hunter. They are reported to have an extremely painful bite, and should be treated with caution. See no. 4434 for an example of an adult and
http://tinyurl.com/mwq56m for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5258 Hi, my name is Rick and I from Temecula, California.   I felt this bug crawling across my arm while I was laying in bed trying to go to sleep one evening. 
This appears to be a well-fed bed bug Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Cimicidae); see
http://tinyurl.com/kj22mkp for an image and http://tinyurl.com/kv7j744 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5257 I keep finding these really tiny beetles on the beams, window sills and doors and occasionally carpets in my old cottage, do you know what they are? Concerned they may be eating our beams on the ceiling? I live in Buckinghamshire in UK. They are in the house all year around.
This is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the subfamily Entiminae (short-snouted/broad-nosed weevils), see
http://tinyurl.com/m95bgxf for an example. These weevils often enter buildings, but do no harm there. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5256  Perry from Brooks, Alberta.  This bug was found April 5, 2015 in the kitchen crawling along corners of cupboards and behind fridge. Various sizes (stages?) I sprayed with Konk.  Seems like they can survive the spray. What is it, how dangerous, do I need to get professional extermination?
This is a nymph of a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Blattellidae), one of the commonest peridomestic pests in North America. See
http://tinyurl.com/7velhwo elsewhere on this site for some control recommendations, and http://tinyurl.com/mnooxo for links to professional pest controllers in your area. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5255  Hello. I have found a couple of these bugs attached to me today and it's freaking me out. What is it? I live in Florida. As you can see, the bug is very small and was embedded in my skin like a tick. I found them below my waist. Thank you!    BeeJay
This is a crab/pubic louse, Pthirus pubis (Phthiraptera: Phthiridae); an obligate ectoparasite of humans. See http://tinyurl.com/3bpmhy for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5254  Hi, This photo is taken indoors in Burnaby, BC today. I suspect this came through the Indian grocery store to my house. I can't recognize it.  Please let me know what it is and how to get rid of it. Thanks, Herman
This is an Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae); a very common pantry pest. See
http://tinyurl.com/d5pu6j for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5253 Sir/Ma'am,  My name is Ratnesh, from Mumbai, India, Asia. I have no interest in pest studies or insect business. But for curiosity sake, I want to know the insect-looks like mosquito. Here is our region, we have hundred of tropical insects, and the household -common-mosquitoes as well, normally of 10 millimetre. But this is weird.  First of its kind I noticed. More than 30mm.. And appearing suddenly after unprecedented climate crisis, abnormal weather and damaged season cycle. It will be great if I could know what this kind called, and other details u owe of course.
This is a crane fly (Diptera: Tipulidae); this is a huge family that occurs nearly world-wide. They are completely harmless, but the larvae of a few species that feed on grass roots may become turf pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5252 Hi there what is this bug?  Saw it on the floor in the basement of our apartment building in Oshawa, thanks for your help. Joan.
Nice plastic fake cockroach Ė I once put several of those in a chocolate cake I baked for a friendís birthday! Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5251 This flying bug was the second one found in a window sill April 1 2015 in Delta BC. Last year the same area window slider was found to contain a number of small mud deposits not seen at this time. The window has a tight screen with the only access through a 1/8 inch drain hole or from an open door. My tenant is very concerned about what it is as a new baby will be arriving any day. Thank you for your interest in my query.  Keith. Delta BC
This is a native bee of some kind, perhaps one of the orchard bees - see http://tinyurl.com/q7nmr9s for an example. In addition to being very valuable pollinators, these bees are quite docile, and will sting only after extreme provocation (they usually will not sting to defend themselves). There should be no cause for concern. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5250 I have been finding these grubs everywhere the past month or so.  They will be in groups under my door mat or anything i lift up.  They have no legs.  These ones were under the door mat today,  March 31.  I don't know if it is related to these grubs, but somewhat corresponding with the appearance of them,  I have noticed my lawn (only the previously most healthy portion of it) has turned brown and nearly vanished.   I couldn't see any culprits in the grass upon brief inspection,  but I thought it was worth mentioning since I am aware some pests could be responsible for a healthy lawn fading so fast!  I've included a picture of the lawn for reference.  Any clues to solve this puzzle are appreciated! -Jeni
Like no. 5246, this is another larva of a crane fly (Diptera: Tipulidae) and not a grub. There are some species in the genus Tipula which can cause serious damage to lawns and other turf - see
http://tinyurl.com/my3vk3u for an image of typical damage and http://tinyurl.com/kh7js3g for some control suggestions. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5249 Hi my name is Nicholas, I live in Rochester New York and I keep finding these beetle like insects in my house I don't know we're they are coming from or what they are but I can not seem to keep them out! Usually I see them flying around the turned on lights of my ceiling fan, once or twice I might find them in the bathroom, and I have seen one in my kitchen sick in a cup filled with water and it wouldn't drown I tried. They don't do anything but freak me out and annoy me lol. They vary in size but never are really small and not bigger than a nickle/quarter.
This appears to be a brown marmorated stink bug (Halyomorpha halys; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae). This is an introduced species that has the potential to become a serious pest, especially in fruit orchards. See http://tinyurl.com/mjvdxmb for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5248 This bug was found in a food truck at University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC  Mar. 26, 2015.  Any idea what it is? Tried looking through my book on insects of the northern hemisphere but came up with nothing even close. S.G.
This is a western conifer seed bug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae). In spite of the term Ďwestern,í this bug now is widely distributed across much of North America, and has been introduced into some areas of northern Europe. They primarily are nuisance pests when they enter buildings in search of shelter. See http://tinyurl.com/yf4dj7t for images and more detailed information. A few months ago, this insect was one of the more frequently submitted species to this site. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5247  We are from Kingston Ontario. We keep seeing these little bugsÖIíve also seen silverfish around the house, but Iím not sure what the babies look like. Can anyone identify this bug? Also, the best way to get rid of them would be greatly appreciated.  Thank you.  Matthew
This looks to me more like a beetle larva than a silverfish, but the image is not clear enough for me to be confident of an identification, Is there any way you could obtain a clearer picture? Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5246  Caterpillar found 3/10/15 in treed area in bark dust Portland OR. What moth will this become? Thanks!  Jackson
This not a caterpillar, but a larva of a crane fly (Diptera: Tipulidae), see http://tinyurl.com/q4qggka for an image. This is a huge family, encompassing species having many different life styles. Most larvae are scavengers, but some are predators on other small arthropods and a few can be serious turf pests, feeding on grass roots. The adults look like giant mosquitoes, but cannot bite and are entirely harmless. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5245 Hi, Iím Rick and Iím from the Fraser Valley in B.C. These critters seem to like our rec room. It is a sliding door away from the great outdoors and the back yard is damp. The little round guys on the left seem to like migrating to the bathroom beside the entrance from outdoors while the little millipede wormy thing tends to curl up and die within a few inches of the door. Both are annoying and sort of disgusting. Any way to ďencourageĒ them to go elsewhere? Thanks
The ďround guysĒ are terrestrial crustaceans in the order Isopoda. Commonly are known as sowbugs, pillbugs, woodlice, roly polys, etc., they are for the most part harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter, but they may become nuisance pests when they occur indoors. As they breathe through gills that must be kept moist, they can only persist in damp/humid environments, so moisture management is key to their control. The ďlittle millipede wormy thingĒ is indeed a millipede, an arthropod in the class Diplopoda. The vast majority of these also are harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter, and can become nuisance pests when they occur indoors.  As with the isopods, keeping the indoor environment as dry as practical is the best control method. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5244  I found this bug alive in my bathroom.  I live in Peterborough Ontario Canada. we have had water leaking from apt. above us since January 1st, 2015. The ceiling was removed and they put insulation and a vapor barrier.  The workers came back yesterday to put up drywall. After they left I found this bug in the tub. Worried that it's a bed bug. Kate
This is a blood-feeding bug in the family Cimicidae, either a bed bug or a bat bug. See
http://tinyurl.com/pxf3zpw for an image that shows how to tell them apart, and http://tinyurl.com/kv7j744 for a very comprehensive publication on bed bugs that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5243 We found these things in the attic under the insulation. It was dried up. First photo is the top and the other is the underneath. There was dried bugs and something like worms cocoons in the grooves. We are in south east NB, Canada. Thanks, Vern
This is the work of wasps in the family Sphecidae known as mud daubers. They use damp soil, usually having a high clay content, to construct these Ďnestsí where their larvae develop. The adult wasps provision each cell with paralyzed but living prey (spiders or insects) for their young to feed upon. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5242 I live in Midland Ontario.  About 2-3 weeks ago (beginning of March) we started to have these bugs make an appearance in our kitchen, primarily around the coffee maker and the dishwasher. This has led me to believe that they prefer moist areas. It literally seems as though these things just appeared over night, we went from seeing one, to seeing 5 the next day, and even more the next.  They are now beginning to make appearances in other rooms as of last nightÖthe living room in particular. These bugs are able to scurry into very flat areas such as in seals on the dishwasher, and under baseboards, places where you wouldnít even think theyíd be able to fit. And while it is difficult to tell from the photos they do in fact have wings. Iíd really like to get ahead of this pest problem but feel it best to identify them first, so as to imply the best method to remove these pests once and for all. Thanks.  Gary
This is a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Blattellidae), one of the commonest peridomestic pests in North America. See http://tinyurl.com/7velhwo elsewhere on this site for some control recommendations, and http://tinyurl.com/c9dkng4 for links to professional pest controllers in your area. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5241 Hi. Lately I found a large number of tiny black bugs in my basement and main floor vents. They are about 3 - 5mm long. Most of these claws, some of them have wings and can fly.  Are they ground beetles? Do you think I need professional pest control? Thank you very much. Jerilyn,  Regina, SK
Like No. 5237, this is a small species of ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae) and thus likely to be a beneficial (or at least neutral) predator. It definitely is not a pest needing control. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

5240 Hello, I live in north central BC and have found a few piles of these eggs (?) in my home. I have no signs of bed bugs on my mattress and no sign of any other bugs at all except the odd fly. I found some of these when I moved a couch. They were underneath. Then today I cleaned out my closet and on 2 shelves, under the sweaters, there were many more of these. Could they be eggs for some kind of cloth eating moth or something?  I have looked all over the internet and cannot find pictures the same. They are about the size of the head of a sewing pin, brown in colour, flat and teardrop shape (not sphere shaped) and hard. I tried to squish some but they hold their shape. These images are magnified 50X.  Please advise me as to what this is. I am pretty sure they are eggs rather than poop but would really like to clarify their species. Thanks so much. Claire
These appear to be plant seeds of some kind - you may have a mouse or two setting up a rainy day stash. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

5239 We have noticed these little moths on the ceilings throughout the house on an acreage outside of Calgary.  The ruler is in inches and none of them appear to be larger than 1/4Ē.  Thank you for helping identify which type it is.
Nice find! This is a twenty-plumed moth, Alucita hexadactyla (Lepidoptera; Alucitidae); see
http://tinyurl.com/kfozpfy for an image. Unlike typical moths, Alucita has about twenty thin feathery plumes (with scales on the supporting ribs); they perch with the wings outspread like a fan as in your image. Their larvae feed on the leaves and flower buds of honeysuckle (Lonicera spp.). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5238  Hello there, I live in San Francisco, CA and have been noticing these tiny bugs all around the house. They range in size from 1mmĀ\3mm in length and are either tan or brown in color. The smaller ones seem to be lighter in color, almost translucent. Although not apparent in the photos, their wings are iridescent. My guess is that they are psocids but I read on the website that the wings of domestic species are usually absent. Please help me identify these critters. Also, would appreciate any recommendations of an effective insecticide that works. Would a substance like diatomaceous earth, baking soda, boric acid, or silica gel do anything at all to help control or get rid of them?? Thanks in advance.  Ashley
These are indeed psocids. Although the commonest Ďdomesticí species (booklice in the family Liposcelidae) are wingless, there also are many species of winged (alate) psocids that may find their way indoors. See
http://tinyurl.com/kughlew for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5237 Hi!  I live in Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada and have noticed these bugs for a few months now in my house close to windows so I think they like the light but they are usually on the floor.  They also fly.  Hard to kill as you really have to stomp on them.  I canít seem to get rid of them.  I have been using Doctor Doom time released spray and they do die from that but that's not eliminating them. Please help.  Thank you.
This is a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae); this is a very large family, the vast majority of which are general predators on other small arthropods, and thus often considered beneficial. This is not a pest needing control. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5236  I live in Milton,  Ontario and found this little creature crawling across my pillow tonight.  It was about 1/4 of an inch in length.   It's March 15, and I'm assuming it's out due to our recent warmer weather (first time over freezing in over 3 months). Though in the 9 years I've lived here (second floor apartment in town), I've never seen anything quite like this. Lynette
This is a spider beetle (Coleoptera: Anobiidae; subfamily Ptininae) in the genus Mezium; likely the northern spider beetle, Mezium affine, see
http://tinyurl.com/k6fjymh for an example. Spider beetles and their larvae will feed on a wide variety of organic matter, and sometimes can be pantry pests; see http://tinyurl.com/mamup5 for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5235  I live in Henderson, Nevada. I found this on my bed and I have no idea what it is.
It appears to have six legs. It's brownish and very small. Our apartment stays around 75 degrees.
Please help ID this pest! Thank you.
About all that I can tell from this image is that it appears to be a very tiny beetle, such as a minute brown scavenger beetle (Coleoptera: Latridiidae); see
http://tinyurl.com/kh24y9y for an example. These are nothing to worry about; no control is necessary. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5234 Location: Hamilton, Ontario.  March 17, 2015.  Found in the basement of our house.  Sherrianne.
This appears to be a woodlouse spider, Dysdera crocata. These spiders specialize in preying upon woodlice/sowbugs (crustaceans in the order Isopoda), and they have very large chelicerae (Ďjawsí) for their size that enable them to pierce the tough exoskeletons of their prey. They also can deliver a very painful bite if mishandled. See
http://tinyurl.com/6sjaczh for additional information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5233 Hi, Found this spider in Vancouver, 18th floor condo in mid March. About an inch long or longer and moves extremely quickly. Hannah
This is a jumping spider (family Salticidae) in the genus Phidippus, possibly P. borealis - see
http://tinyurl.com/3ygtrc for an image. These spiders are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5232  Hi! I live in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates. I moved here from Canada last year. Been seeing a lot of creepy crawlies since I've moved here! But these tiny moths have been all over my home for the last 4 or 5 months.  They're about a half cm wide and half cm long.  Can you identify them for me and maybe give me an idea of how to get rid of them. Thanks!
This is not a moth, but a fly in the family Psychodidae. Known variously as moth flies, drain flies, filter flies, or sewer flies, they are harmless nuisance pests. Their larvae usually are found in stagnant/polluted water, including that in floor drains. See
http://tinyurl.com/ycj8btm for more detailed information including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5231 My name is Chris  and I am in Fishers, Indiana.  These bugs started to appear about 2 weeks ago in only one bedroom, mainly the closet, in the upstairs of our home.  I would appreciate any assistance.  Thanks! Chris
This is a metallic wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Their larvae are known as flat-headed wood borers, and some species, such as the emerald ash borer, can be serious timber pests. However, none are known to infest anything in homes. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5230 Hi, My name is Jeremy. I found two bugs on the seem of my mattress today (Wednesday, March 18th, 2015). I live in Montreal, Quebec.  I have also been bitten. One photo shows one of the bugs. They are approximately the size of a small apple seed. The other photo shows possible bedbug feces, in the immediate area where I found the bugs.  Thank you,  Jeremy
You do indeed appear to have an infestation of bed bugs (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Cimicidae). See
http://tinyurl.com/kv7j744 for a very comprehensive publication on bed bugs that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5229 Hello, Andrew from Calgary AB here. I've been finding these all over the house. About 3-5mm long, this one is on a counter top indoors. Taken in March, but its still cold outside. Thanks for your help.
This is a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/hide/skin/larder beetles and allies), likely in the genus Attagenus (black carpet beetle and allies). See
http://tinyurl.com/ll5544c for an example and http://tinyurl.com/3jwyyt9 for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5228 Very small (pin head) roundish bugs migrating from our bathroom. We spray with ant killer, but they keep coming back in numbers. Slow moving. How do we get rid of these? Early spring temps 60-90F. Thank you so much! Cheryl San Diego, CA
This is a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/hide/skin/larder beetles and allies), possibly in the genus Anthrenus, but I cannot be certain without seeing its dorsal (top) side. These beetles are harmless pollen feeders, but their larvae can be quite destructive, as they will feed on just about anything that contains animal protein. See
http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for a University of California publication on carpet beetles and their control. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5227  Hello, My name is Laura and we are near San Francisco, California. This bug was found in the window sill of our kitchen this morning (warm and sunny early spring day if it helps). It looked to be about 3/4 of an inch long or so and could fly. Would like to know if we should be concerned as it is the first time we have seen this bug in our house.
Thank you! Laura
This appears to be a soldier beetle (Coleoptera: Cantharidae), see
http://tinyurl.com/mzj33z3 for an example. Also known as leatherwing beetles, these basically are predatory on other insects, but occasionally may feed a bit on plants. They are not considered pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5226 Hi there, I live just south of Orillia, Ontario and found this insect on the exterior of my home (03/15/15).  The temperature was just around the freezing mark.  Thanks for your help. Regards, Bev
This appears to be a winter stonefly in the family Capniidae - see
http://tinyurl.com/qj2bhsf for an example; they are harmless. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5225 They are brown, only see them when the weather is hot, have found them in the bed rooms, in the blankets on the couch and just this week i found a bunch of them in the flour, but not on anything else. They are tiny and the can fly like gnats, they can survive in a zip lock bag for more than 2 days. I live in Granada hills, ca. I am breaking out in hives not knowing what they are. Please please help me. Thank you very much. God bless.
This might be a cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorn (Coleoptera: Anobiidae); see
http://tinyurl.com/ka7owk5 for an image. These along with their look-alike cousins, drugstore beetles (Stegobium paniceum), can be pests of many kinds of dry stored food products; see http://tinyurl.com/po3y7o2  for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5224 Hi there: These were pulled from within the soil in an organic hop field in Lillooet, BC in early March, 2015. The grubs were about 2 inches beneath the surface of the soil. I hope your network can help ID these bugs!  Thanks, Sam
This appears to be a mature caterpillar of a moth in the family Noctuidae. These caterpillars often burrow into loose soil a short distance before pupating.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5223 We have a number of these showing up in various parts of our house.  They are approximately 5 to 7 mm long.  Could you please identify the type and suggest a method to eliminate them?  Thanks, Regards,  Rod Calgary AB
 
5222 Hello! My name is Ashia. I live in southeastern Michigan and the weather today was in the low 40s. Before today it's been bitterly cold; like in the single digits. I was laying in my bed and I felt something run across my neck. My hand swatted it out of reflex. It was about as long as a penny, with two long antennas. It was black on both ends with a silver middle. Not sure what kind it is. Have never seen it before! Can you please help me identify? I can't sleep because of this!
This looks like a silverfish, Lepisma saccharina (Zygentoma: Lepismatidae), a very common peridomestic nuisance pest along with its close cousin, the firebrat. See
http://tinyurl.com/mc5vk7j Number 5223 - This is a terrestrial crustacean in the order Isopoda. Commonly are known as sowbugs, pillbugs, woodlice, roly polys, etc., they are for the most part harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter, but some species may damage tender plant parts at or below the soil surface, and they may become nuisance pests when they occur indoors. As they breathe through gills that must be kept moist, they can only persist in damp/humid environments, so moisture management is key to their control. Your specimen may be in the family Oniscidae; see http://tinyurl.com/lbxuvl4 for an example.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5221 I live in New Brunswick and when straightening up our bed, found this bug.  We just bought the bed from Costco recently and are wondering where the bug came from. Tracey.
This is a nymph (apparently nearly mature) of Reduvius personatus, a peridomestic assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as the masked hunter. They are reported to have an extremely painful bite, and should be treated with caution. See no. 4434 for an example of an adult and
http://tinyurl.com/mwq56m for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5220 We live in Barrie, Ontario and usually in Spring and Summer I see lots of these spiders inside my home. Should I be worried? I have a baby and we just moved here.  Thanks.  Karla
This appears to be a prowling spider (family Eutichuridae) in the genus Cheiracanthium; see
http://tinyurl.com/k7wvh83 for an example. Commonly known as long-legged sac spiders, they formerly were placed in the family Miturgidae. They frequently are found indoors, and some species can deliver a painful bite.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5219 My name is Allison Hoag I live in Anderson, SC. I found these critters inside my house in our bathroom. They could be coming from skylight? It is March 2015. Any ideas what these are?
This appears to be a nymph of a stink bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae); see
http://tinyurl.com/mbygm86 for an example. These are accidental intruders that will cause no damage indoors.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5218 We have about a half dozen of these arriving through the cracks in the floor daily, here in 100 Mile house, BC. They must be in the crawl space, as they were here in the cold of winter.  They are about 1/32" by 5/16", like very small grains of rice. They are very inactive, don't seem to fly and smell like a strong chemical. We don't find any evidence of them eating anything in the pantry area. They just move incredible slowly or just sit and die close to where they emerge into a room. Thanks for your help.  Steve.
This is a darkling beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae); there are several species in this family that can be pests of grains and other dry stored food products, see
http://tinyurl.com/29qvhmq for an example. You might want to check your food storage areas for signs of insect infestation. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5217 Hi. Can you identify this bug? it stinks really bad. My son found it crawling on our carpet in the room above the craw space. It smells really bad. Edmonton Alberta.
This beetle is Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), commonly known as the larder beetle or bacon beetle. See
http://tinyurl.com/p7zqooo for more detailed information; they can infest a wide variety of food items. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5216  I have found 2 of these this week one in my washer and 2 in my kitchen.  Samantha
This is a nymph of a cockroach, possibly that of a Periplaneta sp. See 
http://tinyurl.com/mj462r6 for an example as well as for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5215  I need info in this bug from Leůn, Gto. Mťxico.  Dr. Javier x.
This is an arachnid in the order Solifugae, they are known variously as camel spiders, wind scorpions, sun spiders, or solifuges. Yours looks like a curve-faced solifugid in the family Ammotrechidae - see
http://tinyurl.com/ck54luz for an image. They are non-venomous, but can deliver a painful bite. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5214  Hi, My name is Herman and I live in Southwestern Ontario. Starting early January until now these two guys have been showing up in our house. February has been the coldest month we have had in 80 years with average temps around -14 C. (At least that is what I heard on the radio) I think the smaller one is a mosquito but its the bigger guy I am curious about. The bigger guy is 13 mm long. They can fly somewhat but mostly climb. They are easy to catch and do not fly away. Any help on identifying it would be appreciated. Thanks,  Herman
The upper insect is long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae); it might be a rustic borer, Xylotrechus colonus - see
http://tinyurl.com/pjzz9yc for an image. Their larvae bore in the wood of several tree species, but do not appear to be serious pests. The lower insect is a wasp in the family Braconidae; this is a very large family, all of whose members are parasitic on other insects. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5213 Found just sitting in the middle of the floor at work in October. It's a little bigger than a quarter. Rich Binghamton,  NY
This is a fine, fat, female grass spider in the family Agelenidae, likely in the genus Agelenopsis - see
http://tinyurl.com/onqm8gv for an example. They are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5212 Found this spider at my bosses house - Shores of Lake Erie in Port Colborne, ON& was curious as to what kind it was.  S.M.
This is a female orb weaving spider in the genus Araneus, likely Araneus diadematus, a very common and widespread species. This specimen likely has laid her eggs, and nearing her lifeís end.  See
http://tinyurl.com/nx6rc4e for a younger example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5211 My first name is Dan, from Montreal (Quebec). Additional info: during the summer, indoor, tends to come out during the night, especially in humid areas.
This is a house centipede, Scutigera coleoptrata, a cosmopolitan species often found in buildings where they actively hunt down other arthropods, primarily insects. Reportedly, they can inflict a painful but not dangerous bite if mishandled, See
http://tinyurl.com/mn7mzf for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5210 Hi there, we live in Manitoba and have a wood burning fireplace. We recently discovered several of these bugs in the fireplace area on the floor and carpet. The do not fly, we think they may have come in with the firewood. Please advise.  Friederike
The image is not clear enough for me to be absolutely certain, but this looks like a beetle in the family Trogidae (hide beetles), see http://tinyurl.com/o8cr78x for an example. These beetles usually are scavengers on dried/desiccated animal remains, including skin, bone, hair, and feathers. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5209 Thanks for your help. The insect is small in the picture but the resolution is clear when you zoom in. I live in Hong Kong. The weather is cold and wet and this was found on my terrace. I live in the city and there are a lot of building pipes and some drains on my terrace. Ughhhhh!  Shonee
This is an earwig (order Dermaptera). These are for the most part scavengers on decomposing organic matter or predators on other insects, but some can cause damage to very tender plants (such as seedlings), flowers, and soft fruits. They also can become nuisance pests when they come indoors. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5208 Hello,  I would like to have an insect identified. It's a 6 legged creature that might be filled with blood. I live in Toronto, in York University's Mature Student Housing. Right now, it's the coldest time of the year right (Feb ). I found this insect in the kitchen half a week ago and it scurried away extremely fast. I couldn't catch it. Then today I found it (or a different one) again on the kitchen counter with two others (that it was travelling with this time--which looked like its babies because the two new insects were WAY smaller). I had to take the pictures of this insect through a glass that it is currently captured in, so I don't know if the glass has warped the shape of the bug's body at all, but hopefully it has not. It seems to crawl. Today I looked under the stove to check for more of these bugs (or others) and it looked like there were larvae under the stove. I don't know if this larvae is related to this insect or not. Please let me know if I should be worried about these things biting me or multiplying. Thanks. Holly.
This is a nymph of  a German cockroach (Blattella germanica; Blattodea: Blattellidae). This species is notoriously difficult to control; you might try consulting a professional pest management service in your area - see
http://tinyurl.com/or25l43 elsewhere on these pages for some options.    Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5207 Pleaser help me identify this pest. My name is Cindy,  I live in San Antonio, TX. I started getting bit by some unknown pest around mid - November. I am the only one bothered by this pest. Both my husband and my 13 yr old grand-daughter do not get bit. The picture that Iím sending you is of a different type of  "gnat" or "fly" that I hit n was able to take a pic of. It seems to be ready to hatch something.  I am going crazy with this pest and appreciate any help you can give me. Thank you.
This appears to be a small moth of some kind, and thus would be incapable inflicting any bite.     Unfortunately, it is nearly impossible to determine the cause of Ďmystery bitesí without being able to capture or see the culprit(s) in the act of biting.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5206  Found this in my basement last summer, in Ottawa Ontario about the size of a quarter.  Any idea??
Thanks.  Joe
This is a nymph of Reduvius personatus, a peridomestic assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as the masked hunter. They are reported to have an extremely painful bite, and should be treated with caution. See no. 4434 for an example of an adult and
http://tinyurl.com/mwq56m for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5205  Hello, I've been capturing this insect around bird seed packages on insect glueboards. It is vary small, under 1mm in size. Location is North of the GTA.  When first captured/became aware of them I caught around 70, at two week intervals afterwards I wound catch only a few. Adam
This appears to be a nymph of a booklouse/barklouse (order Psocodea, suborder Psocomorpha), perhaps in the family Trogiidae - see
http://tinyurl.com/lujwoa for an example. These basically are nuisance pests, as they appear to feed primarily on mold spores, such as found on spoiled grains.    Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5204 My name is Jane and I live in Hamilton, Ontario. We found this guy in the bag of lettuce we bought this week. We have no idea where the lettuce is from as it came, unlabelled from a wholesaler. He is brown with obvious segments. He curls into a spiral when touched.  About 1.5 -2 cm long. Hopefully I haven't eaten any of his brothers.
This is a caterpillar of af a moth in the family Noctuidae that belongs the group including cutworms, armyworms, etc.    Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.         
5203 My son keeps finding these in my yard....  yuck  Jody
The very long tail and black fur would indicate this is likely a roof rat.
5202  I don't have a bug to identify but have the debris generated by bug ďXĒ which I am trying to figure out what it is and how to deal with it.  We found attached debris on the door sill portion of a new home, the floor construction is tile over concrete. The house was build this year. The location of the property is Redondo Beach California.  I don't think this was generated by termite. Please Help. Gerardo.
When soil is disturbed for new home foundations, anything living there could relocate into the wood construction. This frass or debris does not look like it was created by wood destroying ants.  It appears to be damp and more like termites would produce.  It is hard to tell but there appears to be some tan colored insects in the debris that could be termites.  You should have a termite specialist do an inspection.
               ~~~~~~~~~~~
I concur that the insects visible resemble termites and that the material looks like termite frass (see http://tinyurl.com/lzxj99a for an example), but the newness of the structure would seem to weigh against this.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5201 I live in Ontario and found this in my to be washed laundry bin end of February. It was about 3 cm long and was oozing green goo. It has been -25C weather outside, however due to my desert lizard my room is around 90-100F during the day dropping to 70F at night. There was only one. He was alive and moving.  Thank you
This is a pupa of a moth of some kind, but nothing that would be a pest in your home. A caterpillar likely somehow found itself indoors and had no choice but to undergo pupation where it found itself. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5200 New house bug spotted 4 times, 3 in bedroom and once in the bathroom. Black and yellow striped beetle looking bug, very slow moving.   One time I killed it I thought I saw very clear minor wings but I'm not certain. Located in California, United States.  What kind of bug is this and what does it feed on? How to kill it? Thank you for your help. 
This is a varied carpet beetle, Anthrenus verbasci (Coleoptera: Dermestidae). These beetles are harmless pollen feeders, but their larvae can be quite destructive pests. See
http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for a University of California publication on carpet beetles and their control. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5199  My name is Bree, I live in Ohio and I found this little thing upside down on the floor, he's alive, but I'm hoping it's not a cockroach.
Unfortunately, this is a cockroach; it looks like a nymph of a Periplaneta sp. See 
http://tinyurl.com/mj462r6 for an example as well as for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5198  I've attached a close-up photo of a bug I found in my apartment today. I live in Vancouver. It was very small, about 3mm. Thanks! Anthony
Like No. 5194, this a nymph of a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Ectobiidae). See
http://tinyurl.com/7velhwo elsewhere on this site for more detailed information, including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5197 My name is Li and I'm looking to identify this bug. We have found a couple of these small bugs while renovating our basement. One was found on our baseboard (indoors) and the other was about 6 feet from the exit (indoors), making its way further into the house. It is grey/brown with thin white-ish 'pinstripes' running lengthwise down its body. It has 6 legs and 2 antennae. It measured approx. 4 mm from nose to bottom with 2 short antennae. The body is hard.  We live next to a wooded area, no pets. We found them a couple days apart, today being the most recent. It hasn't rained here for a few days and the weather temp has been about 10 degrees daily. We weren't sure if this was a tick or not. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks
This is not a tick, but a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the subfamily Entiminae (broad-nosed/short-snouted weevils); they often come indoors in search of shelter but do no harm there. See No. 5186 for another example.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5196 What is this I keep seeing in my house a lot. Carmen
This is a flat-backed millipede (order Polydesmida) in the family Paradoxosomatidae. Most millipedes are harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter, but some in this family, such as the garden millipede (Oxidus gracilis; see
http://tinyurl.com/opgfb7k), can damage tender vegetation.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5195 We live in Vancouver Canada, and found this bug inside close to the patio door. Total length is about 2 cm.   Any help would be appreciated. Scott
This is a western conifer seed bug,  Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae). This bug is widely distributed across much of North America, and has been introduced into some areas of northern Europe. They primarily are nuisance pests when they enter buildings in search of shelter. See
http://tinyurl.com/yf4dj7t for images and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5194 Found this on the floor in my apartment. It's been a warm winter (February now) and my apartment is usually very warm.  It is approximately half a centimeter in length. Mostly black with a yellowish spot. My friend is visiting from Ontario and has been noticing bites on her back. Thanks, Tiffany, Vancouver, BC
This is a nymph of a German cockroach, Blattella germanica (Blattodea: Ectobiidae). See
http://tinyurl.com/7velhwo elsewhere on this site for more detailed information, including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5193 Sheryl Harding. ....its the winter months here in Illinois. Its about 5 degrees right now.  February 15th. I have seen one of these bugs in my bed at least 5 to 6 times within the last 4 months. I live in the south suburbs of Chicago,  Illinois. Are these bed bugs?
This is a bristletail, a primitive insect in the order Zygentoma, likely either a silverfish or firebrat that has lost nearly all its scales and parts of its appendages. These primarily are nuisance pests that seldom do real harm. See
http://tinyurl.com/lsuugn for a fact sheet with more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5192 Would you please ID the ants in these photos.  Initially we found them on our fence but they have migrated to the foundation of the house, inside the basement and now on the main level.  Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Unfortunately, this image will not enlarge enough for me to see diagnostic details. Can you provide any others that show a clear, close-up image? Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5191 Hi, I live in the Santa Clarita Valley in California. I was cleaning out my closet when I found this long, worm like bug with pincers on the back. It's a light brownish color with a lot of little legs. Laticia.
This is a scolopendrid centipede; it resembles Theatops californiensis (see
http://tinyurl.com/n6fsy67 for an image), but I cannot be certain that it is that species. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5190 If possible please identify this for me. I found it inside flying into a light bulb. It then landed on the table. It appeared to be able to fly a little bit. I live in Vancouver and it has been rainy and wet. It is February. This is the second one I have found. I'm terrified that it is a cock roach! I am not sleeping. Help please.  KD
This is a western conifer seed bug,  Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae This bug is widely distributed across much of North America, and has been introduced into some areas of northern Europe. They primarily are nuisance pests when they enter buildings in search of shelter. See http://tinyurl.com/yf4dj7t for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5189 Hi,   My name is Juliet, I live on Cape Cod, MA.  This is the second one of these my kittens have found. Both seem to have come out from underneath my electric baseboard heater, located on an outside wall with a southern exposure.  I thought they were bees at first, they buzz very loudly, but looking at the eyes, mouth and feet I think they are some kind of fly?  They didn't sting my kittens even though they had it in their mouths and "messed" with the insect a bit before I retrieved it.  I'm thinking it's a March fly or a Bee fly?  Why are they coming out now, it's early February and outdoors it's very cold and snowy?  I thank you in advance for any information.  Sincerely, Juliet.
This is a fly in the family Syrphidae (flower/hover flies); it appears to be Merodon equestris, known as the narcissus bulb fly - see
http://tinyurl.com/k9lrdry for an image.. Its larvae feed on narcissus and lily bulbs, hence its name. This is a European species that has been introduced to North America, likely through the bulb trade. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5188 Hello! My name is Andi. I live in Nanaimo, BC. Recently these guys have been popping up in my house.  I've been noticing these black ones down in my room.  I'm very concerned that it might be a male widow but doesn't look like any of the current website pictures. I believe I was bitten by one this morning and since then my entire arm has been very itchy and warm. I also have a dog that spends most of his time in my room and has a tendency to eat bugs and spiders so I'm mainly concerned about him eating or getting bit by something venomous! Any identification or help would be much appreciated! Any suggestions on how I can rid my home of them without chemical sprays would be really, really helpful.  I've tried chestnuts and things found on Google, but I find the spiders just move location, they don't leave!
This spider is in the same family (Theridiidae) as the widow spiders, but in a different genus (Steatoda). This one could be either S. bipunctata or S. borealis, neither is dangerous to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5187  Hello from Surrey in the UK. I found these in my upstairs bedrooms crawling over the carpets, and on the bathroom floor, last summer. I kept sweeping them up and they disappeared for a while. Now it is winter here and, with the central heating on, they are back in the carpets, sometimes climbing the walls, too. I have found nearly 100 over the last few weeks! What should I do? Should I be looking for a nest? Where do I look? 2-4 mm in size. Thank you! Jo
These are beetles in the family Tenebrionidae, and given their small size, they may be in the genus Tribolium, which includes some pantry pests. I suggest that you check your pantries and any other food storage areas for signs of infestation. See
http://tinyurl.com/29qvhmq for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5186  We live in Laval, near Montreal, Qc Canada. Found 4 or 5 of these in the house during January and February 2015 (wintertime). Many indoors plants in the house. Measure ~ 6mm.  Thanks
Like no. 5180, this also appears to be a black vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5185  I have scanned through almost all listings on your bug identification directory and still have not found this particular specimen.  We reside in Gooderham, Ontario, in an old farm house and burn only firewood for heat.  I imagine that this insect is inside for warmth but I want to be certain that it isn't of the wood-borer kind.  The bug is greyish with rusty orange details, moves somewhat slow and flies only a very short distance (a few feet).  It measures about 1.5 cm not including antennae. 
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the genus Saperda. It appears to be Saperda imitans, a species whose larvae feed in various dead hardwoods including the genera Carya (hickories), Prunus (plums, cherries, etc.), and Salix (willows). It will not harm anything in your home. This also appears to be a relatively uncommon species; nice find! Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5184  I live in Kelowna BC, and just started seeing these bugís mid May , I find a few walking along my sundeck railing, but for the most part they seem to be in my basement ( just one room thought ) I was doing renoís in the winter and took some dry wall down, behind one of the sheet was about 500-750 dead bugs. Thanks, Ryan.
Like no. 5180, this is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the subfamily (Entiminae; broad-nosed/short-snouted weevils), but a different species. Weevils in this subfamily often invade buildings in search of overwintering shelter, but do no harm there. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5183  Working in a clients home and these bugs are on the table, in napkins, envelopes and even in the partial board ceiling tile. I can't find info anywhere. They are so small that when you try to squish them with your finger, they sometimes just shoot across the table.  Please help me identify these little guys.
The image is not clear enough for me to be 100 percent certain, but these look an awful much like beetles in the family Dermestidae (carpet/hide/skin/larder beetles, etc.). Their larvae will feed on an extremely wide variety of organic materials, primarily of animal origin (including other dead insects), which can make complete control difficult. See http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5182  Hi.   I have found this pest in door in our 2nd floor hallway mid winter. I've noticed exit holes on exterior framing ( rest is stucco) on front and side of duplex. My husband thinks the hole in posts on our porch are old nail holes but I've noticed them high up on the 2nd floor exterior. We live in Canada in the rocky mountains. Is this a carpenter ant? How can I get rid of these? Are they harmful? Thank you so much in advance. Worried
This appears to be a queen carpenter ant (Camponotus sp.), but I doubt that the holes you mention would have been made by the ants, as their damage usually is pretty well hidden. See
http://tinyurl.com/qfm3la5 on the pestcontrolcanada page for advice on how to deal with them. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5181 I live in Edmonton, Alberta and these just appeared in the last week.....they crawl only and some keep ending up in my cats' water dishes. Can you tell me what they are?
This is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); if it is very small (4 mm or less), it might be one of grain/granary weevil in the genus Sitophilus, cosmopolitan pests of whole seeds, including rice, wheat, and corn (maize). See
http://tinyurl.com/bw2oa8f for an example and http://tinyurl.com/cff3o6r for some control suggestions. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5180 My name is Megan, live in south western Ontario (Sarnia  area). Approx 1cm long. Have found about 15 in my home so far! Slow moving. Black. It is early February, very cold outside.
This is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the subfamily (Entiminae; broad-nosed/short-snouted weevils). It might be a black vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus, a species that often is found seeking shelter indoors; they do no harm there.  See
http://tinyurl.com/pfjs654 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5179  Good afternoon, Saw this insect in my bed sheet. It seemed to walk backwards and very slowly. It was very hairy and dark in color as the picture shows.  Should I be concerned?  I live in Grand Rapids, Michigan.  Thank you very much.  Carlos
This is a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/hide/skin/larder beetles, etc.). It might be an Anthrenus sp. (variegated carpet beetle and allies). These can be difficult to control because of their widely varying food preferences. See
http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for some  control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5178  Hi my name is Krystle and I am from Hawaii on the island of Oahu. I have been finding these little bugs in random places from the bathroom to my bedroom. They skitter when disrupted and come out in day or night. They have 4 legs and wings, but do not fly. They are only a couple millimeters long. If you could help it would be greatly appreciated.
This looks like one of the grain beetles in the genus Oryzaephilus, either a saw-toothed (O. surinamensis) or merchant (O. mercator) grain beetle. They feed primarily on damaged grains or grain-derived dry stored food products, and can become pantry pests. See
http://tinyurl.com/m99jkh4 for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5177  Terry from Waterloo, WI., USA This guy came crawling across my counter top. I think I've seen them walking the edge of my carpet. Didn't seem to be fast and came out in a lit room. Thanks
This is a nymph of a cockroach; it looks like that of a brown-banded cockroach, Supella longipalpa;  Blattodea: Blattellidae. See http://tinyurl.com/oradll2 for an image and http://tinyurl.com/lgqcdxe for more information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5176  Shawn W.  Beaverton, ON,   - body almost 1/2" ,   " hair" on legs and body,  found indoors in kitchen between two cabinets.  - Jan. 24.  Took spider outside because my lady really, really, doesn't like them...poor little "shrunk" right away.
This is a ground spider (Family Gnaphosidae); it is one of the so-called parson spiders in the genus Herpyllus - see
http://tinyurl.com/lr8wd8 for an example. They are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5175  I found this bug under our bed. We had left sticky traps to try to determine if we had any bugs and this one turned up on the sticky trap. I also saw two others  in other areas of the house but they were smaller. This one is about 3 mm in size. We found them in September/October must I have not found any recently. I live in Toronto, Ontario.
This appears to be a beetle in the family Bostrichidae (false/horned powder-post beetles) - see http://tinyurl.com/k9trp8w for an intact example. The vast majority of these are harmless, developing in twigs/small branches of dead/dying trees; only a very few species will infest finished lumber. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5174 Hi my name is Mitch i live in Vancouver Canada. This little guy about size of a quarter was in my old work boot in my warehouse. I noticed there are some brown markings on the back of his head and abdomen if u can zoom in. I cant seem to find out what spider this is any help would be great. I was thinking it might belong to the widow family not too sure. Thanks a lot.  Mitch
This spider is indeed in the same family (Theridiidae) as the widow spiders, but it is in a different genus, Steatoda. I cannot be certain, but this specimen could be either S. bipunctata or S. borealis; neither is dangerous to humans, but they could give you a painful bite if mishandled. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5173 Victoria, BC, Canada.  January. Found indoors near the ceiling. From approximately a foot or so away they seemed like specs of dirt on the wall but upon further inspection there was close to a hundred spread out across a 2 meter diameter. I used a 15x magnifier to get a proper close-up to help identify this.
This is an unusual type of millipede (class Diplopoda) known as a duff millipede (Polyxenus lagurus; Polyxenida: Polyxenidae); see
http://tinyurl.com/mu8nm2b for an image. They basically are scavengers, feeding primarily on decaying plant matter, fungi and algae. However, they also can be nuisance pests when they invite themselves indoors, usually concentrated near areas of high moisture, such as bathrooms, around kitchen sinks, and faucets. No control other than perhaps vacuuming them up is necessary. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5172 We live in Smithers BC, Canada. It is now during the winter months and cold outside so I thought maybe this little beetle or insect is trying to seek warmth since my bedroom is always very warm. I recently found 3 of these bugs in my bedroom in our basement in the past 2 days. I always find them around my bed, either on the side table or on top of my blankets. He is dark brown with speckled black dots around the edges of his back and he has a cris cross pattern on he back which might be his wings folded in. When I squished him I noticed he had a hard shell like texture and he did not squish completely flat. I know it is not a bed bug but I was wondering if they bite or are harm. Please help! I've found 2 crawling on me while going to bed at night.
This appears to be a birch catkin bug, Kleidocerys resedae (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Lygaeidae); see
http://tinyurl.com/le9v8yg for an image. As their name implies, they feed mainly on birch catkins and kill the seed, but they do not cause damage to the growth or appearance of the trees. They may enter buildings in search of winter shelter, but do no harm there. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5171  This bug was found in my bed on me in January. We live in the piedmont region of North Carolina and although it had rained heavy last week, the two days prior to this were dry and cold. Temps in the 20s at night and the 40s in the day.
This is a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/larder/hide/skin beetles, etc.); likely in the genus Attagenus (black carpet beetles and allies).  See http://tinyurl.com/ll5544c for an example and http://tinyurl.com/3jwyyt9 for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5170  These bugs are indoors all year around, able to fly and at times are attracted to light, we have only seen one size and are about 3mm in length, they donít appear to be attracted to the pantry or kitchen. We donít seem to find them more in one room than another so it appears they are not attracted to say water or kitchen crumbs. Best Regards Larry
The image is not clear enough for me to be certain of an i.d., but its overall appearance is consistent with it being a small ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae). The vast majority of these beetles are general predators on other small arthropods; none are household pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5169 This is the second time I have seen a large number of these insects in my house This year End of January last year early May I'm hoping you can identify so I may eradicate.  Marie
These appear to be male carpenter ants, and the fact that you see numbers of them could mean that you have an infestation somewhere in your home. These can be difficult to control; if you live in Canada, see the following link on the pestcontrolcanada site:
http://tinyurl.com/qfm3la5. If you live in the United States, see http://tinyurl.com/pednnoc,  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5168 These bugs have appeared in my cold cellar in basement late fall. Please help identify and solution to get rid of them. Thanks.  Sue
These are spider beetles (Coleoptera: Anobiidae; subfamily Ptininae); likely whitemarked spider beetles, Ptinus fur - see
http://tinyurl.com/oaf9x48 for an image. Spider beetles basically are nuisance pests that will feed on a wide variety of organic materials, but they sometimes can be pantry pests. See http://tinyurl.com/mamup5 for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5167 Found Jan. 25, 2015  in 4' x 4' x 18 "(inches) raised vegetable planter when 10 inches of dirt removed in Irvine, California (Southern California)
This is a pupa of a large sphinx moth (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae, such as a tomato or tobacco hornworm - see
http://tinyurl.com/adgxorh for an image. Mature caterpillars of these species burrow down in loose soil before undergoing pupation. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5166  Thank you for providing this service. I do hope you can help me. I live in Ottawa, Ontario in a building of apartments that is about 40-50 years old. These little bugs started popping up in the fall and they are still around now in the cold winter (temperatures around -20). They range in size (I'm assuming by age) from 3mm-10mm. They are usually in our kitchen, I have never found them in our food. I have seen a few in our bathroom mirror vanity. I am meticulous with cleaning so I don't see anything they can be getting into. Our apartment is quite warm and dry. They are almost see-through, and they have 2 little black spikes/stingers on the back. Really hoping they aren't anything worse than harmless insects. Thank you so much for your time and effort. Paulina Z. 
This is a cockroach nymph, perhaps a brown-banded cockroach (Supella longipalpa; Blattodea: Blattellidae); see
http://tinyurl.com/ktrsvbk for an image. Control of these cockroaches can be difficult, particularly in apartment-type buildings, as they have less need for moisture than most other roaches, and may move about more. See http://tinyurl.com/lgqcdxe for a fact sheet that includes detailed control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5165  Hi, We have discovered this bug alike which measures 1mm in size, on the ceiling. The amount of the bug is more than a hundred. They crawl fast when you touch them, they jump/hop. We would like to seek your assistance to discern it's identity.  The photos were took using Rayner magnifying glass. Thank you.   Best Regards,  Angela
This is a booklouse (Psocodea: Liposcelidae). They basically are nuisance pests that thrive best under damp/humid conditions, feeding mainly on mold spores and bits of organic debris, but they sometimes will attack starchy materials such as book bindings. See
http://tinyurl.com/mjydktu for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5164  Hello my name is Chais. I found this bug in the storage room of my apartment in Toronto. I have found other ones in the kitchen and bedroom. They have ranged from about 1 to 2 cm. It is winter time now.
This appears to be a nymph of an oriental cockroach, Blatta orientalis (Blattodea: Blattidae). See
http://tinyurl.com/ydyj3po for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5163 My name is Jo-Ann and I live near Mill Lake in Abbotsford BC. Please identify and suggest ways to get rid of these flying insects. Only seen once every few days. Also occasionally as larvae. Easy to kill don't usually fly away as one approaches to squish. Thanks for your help.
I cannot be absolutely certain from this image, but a likely suspect would be an Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae); a very common pantry pest. See
http://tinyurl.com/d5pu6j for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5162 Hello! I live in Florida and I found this bug on my bathroom wall. Some people told me that it is a termite while others told me it's a web-spinner. What do you think it is?
This definitely is a webspinner (order Embiidina), and itís a male (only males have wings); likely Oligotoma saundersii.  See
http://tinyurl.com/qgoddmk for detailed information on the life history of these fascinating insects. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5161 Hi Folks: I think this may be a leaf-footed bug. Not sure how they get into the house during the fall months. When it is still warm, we put them back outdoors. Otherwise we put them in the bay window where they find flowers (food?). Or should we throw them all outside? We have never noticed any damage. As they don't seem to be harmful inside the house, we decided to let them live. We are not sure if they take any food. Can they survive until spring? We can then get rid of them. These bugs live in rural Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. Thanks for your input. Best regards, Gunter S.
This is a leaf-footed bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae). No detail is visible in this image, but the most likely suspect is a western conifer seed bug,  Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae This bug is widely distributed across much of North America, and has been introduced into some areas of northern Europe. They primarily are nuisance pests when they enter buildings in search of shelter. See
http://tinyurl.com/yf4dj7t for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
5160  Hello, I live in an apartment in Toronto, Canada, and found two of these bugs on my wood floor. I also found several dead ones on my windowsill.  These tiny black/ dark brown bugs look like little beetles, and are around 2-3 millimeters in size. I could see that they have wings (at one point I was agitating one of the bugs while trying to take a photo of it, and it extended it's wings), but did not observe them flying. I'm pretty concerned that these are bed bugs - any help identifying these bugs would be greatly appreciated! Thank you, Dalia
This appears to be a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/hide/skin beetles, etc.). It looks like an Attagenus sp. (black carpet beetle and allies); see
http://tinyurl.com/lnn67cw for an image and http://tinyurl.com/pvgfq3 for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5159 I'm in north east Texas at a fertilizer plant. We've been getting these bugs in our Alfalfa meal. They like to stay under covers  and run when u hit them with light. Here is a pic of them and their eggs.
These are spider beetles (Coleoptera: Anobiidae; subfamily Ptininae), likely Gibbium aequinoctiale, known as the smooth spider beetle. See
http://tinyurl.com/kbwkpsx for an image and http://tinyurl.com/mamup5 for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5158  This was found in our basement in Kitchener Ontario on January 12 2015 near an outside window. There were 4 in total in the basement. They are about 3 cm long. It is stuck on a straight pin. Thank you, Roger
This is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the subfamily (Entiminae; broad-nosed/short-snouted weevils). It might be a black vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus, a species that often is found seeking shelter indoors. See
http://tinyurl.com/pfjs654 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
5157  I'm from Toronto.  This was found yesterday (taken from my wife's belly button). There were 3-4 on her (we found throughout the day). Note: There is no evidence of bed bugs in my home or bed (even had a bed bug exterminator come by and check), except that we have some bites on us. Thus this bug is around 1mm in size.  I looks similar to a bed bug in my opinion - thus want to get another opinion. Thanks,  Toby
This looks to me more like a bird or rodent mite than a bed bug, see http://tinyurl.com/oand6us for an example. These mites will feed on humans in the absence of their usual hosts, but their bites are more of a nuisance than a danger. See http://tinyurl.com/ofjhup4 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.         
5156  The bug looks big in the photos because it is zoomed in but it is actually tiny. Only about 2 mm. Have seen a few of these in my condo in midtown Toronto. My building is only 5 years old. Found one in kitchen, one in bathroom, one in closet, one in living room, all over a span of several months.
This is a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/skin/hide beetles, etc.). Their larvae will feed on an extremely wide range of organic materials, including furs, feathers, wool/silk fabrics, taxidermy mounts, accumulations of dead insects, dry stored food products, etc.  See
http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for some general control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
5155 We live in Sechelt BC and have noticed hundreds of these larva appear on our cement porch. This is January cold and rainy. They are about 1/2 inch long. What are they??  Cheers,  Stuart
This is a larva of a fly in the suborder Nematocera, either a crane fly (family Tipulidae) or a closely related one such as Limoniidae - see http://tinyurl.com/nuo8jhd for an example. Larvae such as these usually are found in very damp/wet soil with a high organic content, where they are scavengers. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
5154 Hello,  These started to appear in our home in Quebec on walls and windows at the beginning of December. We find about 3-4 a week. They are quite lethargic and easy to catch. They measure about 1.5 cm. Thanks,  Guy
These are soldier flies (Diptera: Stratiomyidae). The species is Ptecticus trivittatus; see http://tinyurl.com/7aawk67 for an image. These flies are harmless; their larvae feed on decomposing organic matter. We often see them in our home, where they appear to exhibit a sense of curiosity. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.         
5153  Hi there.  They are about 3-4mm long. I live in South Surrey, BC. I have found these about once every couple weeks for several years inside my house, typically on a wall, often in a bathroom. I can't say that they appear one time of the year more than others.  They aren't a major bother but I also don't want them to get out of control. Also, I did find a few alive in an open ziplock bag inside another clear plastic bag and the ziplock had many holes in it (perhaps they've been trapped and trying to chew their way out or do they eat plastic??) I look very forward to getting an answer on this as I've never found anything on my own searching. Thank you sooo much!  Regards, Amanda.
This is a larva of a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae); apparently an Anthrenus sp. (variegated carpet beetle and allies). These can be difficult to control because of their widely varying food preferences. See http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for some general control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.         
5152  Found in basement, Lethbridge Alberta. 1/2 inch tip of leg to tip of leg. 
This is a cobweb/comb-footed spider (family Theridiidae) in the genus Steatoda. I cannot tell for certain from this ventral view, but it likely is either S. bipunctata (
http://tinyurl.com/lnkwns7) or S. borealis (http://tinyurl.com/nkn4rvq). These spiders usually are shy and non-aggressive, but can bite if handled carelessly. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.         
5151  Hello my name is Laura. I live between Houston and Galveston, Texas. Its December in a typical winter season. Temp outside is 49į tonight. Upon waking in the very early morning hours, I found a rather large size bug by my closet in my room, just crawling around. This bug was shiny black in color, 6 legs, antennas and pincher looking face. It looked like a cross between a Beatle and a giant ant.  Thank You,  Laura
This is a blister beetle (Coleoptera: Meloidae), apparently in the genus Meloe. Beetles in this genus sometimes are called oil beetles because of the oily fluid they exude from their joints when handled roughly. This fluid contains a chemical, cantharidin, that can cause blisters on tender skin. See http://tinyurl.com/k237k24 for an image and more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5150  One day we found this in our kitchen floor and cabinet, after short investigation located jar of brown rice witch was getting bad (mold on the top etc...). Strange part of this, is that the jar was sealed off and larva manage to escape from it.
These appear to be caterpillars (larvae) of the Indianmeal moth, Plodia interpunctella (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae); a very common pantry pest. See http://tinyurl.com/d5pu6j for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5149  I live in s Florida. I keep finding these bugs in the sink in my laundry room which is outside in the backyard. I find many dead inside the cup from the detergent.
This is a grain/granary weevil in the genus Sitophilus, cosmopolitan pests of whole seeds, including rice, wheat, and corn (maize). See http://tinyurl.com/bw2oa8f for an example and http://tinyurl.com/cff3o6r for some control suggestions. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
5148  Your website is fantastic.  After much browsing I was unable to identify the attached creature.  I am hoping you can assist. These started appearing roughly around the time my girlfriend brought some old birch tree trunks into the house that she was going to cut up and make into tea light candle holders.  That is not to say that is where these originated from, however some of them had what appeared to be tiny tunnels.  We find these bugs mostly near the patio door, probably 50% of the time on the window itself.  One or two were found near the top of the stairs on the wall.  All found during the daytime and they do not really move, very easy to kill.  They are roughly an inch in length.  They have wings on them.  photo taken late December.  We average finding one of these a day. Any assistance would be appreciated.  Thank you in advance. Andrew Van B. Ottawa, Ontario
This is a wood wasp in the family Xiphydriidae and the genus Xiphydria; it might be Xiphydria mellipes, as its larvae reportedly bore and feed in small dead or weakened limbs of birch trees. These will cause no damage to anything in your home. See http://tinyurl.com/llt539c for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5147 Hello,  Found this on the floor of my bedroom on the case of my heating pad. Terrified it's a bed bug! I did find black spots on my bed sheet but they don't seem to be blood. Very concerned and hope you can help. Thanks for the assistance! Lily
Definitely not a bed bug, this appears to be one of the grain beetles in the genus Oryzaephilus, either a saw-toothed (O. surinamensis) or merchant (O. mercator) grain beetle. They feed primarily on damaged grains or grain-derived dry stored food products, and can become pantry pests. See http://tinyurl.com/m99jkh4 for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5146 Hi, This is the third black  bug (approx. 1 cm length) found in a bedroom  in the last 7 days, month of December. I checked your website and I am not sure if this could be # 5076, Coleoptera. We live in Ottawa and we have never seen these ones before.  Thank you, Orlando.
Like no, 5076, this is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), but in a different subfamily (Entiminae; broad-nosed/short-snouted weevils). It might be a black vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus, a species that often is found seeking shelter indoors. See http://tinyurl.com/pfjs654 for more detailed information.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5145 Hi there, my name is Brittany, I'm from Nova Scotia, and it is December 22. I can't seem to figure out what these bugs are. They look to be brown/black or gray, with small horizontal light coloured stripes on its body under the wings/shell. I have just started noticing them flying around our house lately. I usually come across quite a few a day and I don't know where they're coming from or what I should do. Hope you can help me out. - Brittany
- This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae); it looks like a Xylotrechus sp., see http://tinyurl.com/pjzz9yc for an example. These may be emerging from/coming in on firewood; they will not damage anything in your home. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5144 HELP please! Boston MA. Found these wormy bugs in my bedroom under clean clothes piles and towels placed down under cat box and where she used to eat. (Cat passed of old age 10 months ago). Some dead some alive. No hair like description of carpet beetles. FREAKING OUT!! No rug holes or clothes holes seen. Bigger one has antenna things on one end and a head or tail on one end. None in the bed or closet or drawers. Please help identify and advice. Thank you. Lisa D. Boston MA
These appear to be larvae of carpet beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) in the genus Attagenus (black carpet beetles and allies). See
http://tinyurl.com/ll5544c for an example; it is very common for these larvae to lose many of their body hairs, especially the longer ones, during their life. Also see http://tinyurl.com/3jwyyt9 for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5143 These little buggers are showing up indoors in December in Miami, Florida. I've found them especially around some storage boxes we have.  Christina
This is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); it looks like one of the grain/granary weevils in the genus Sitophilus, cosmopolitan pests of whole seeds, including rice, wheat, and corn (maize). See
http://tinyurl.com/bw2oa8f for an example and http://tinyurl.com/cff3o6r for some control suggestions. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5142 Hi I'm Sam.  I found a few of these bugs in my basement mostly near water source areas. Like the sub pump or sink. They are maybe 1/8 of an inch. Please help.  Toronto Ontario. 
This is a small beetle, but primarily because of the angle from which the image was taken, I cannot see enough detail to hazard a more specific identification. The worst case scenario would be that it might be one of the pests that can infest dry stored food products. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

5141 At the end of December, in a metropolitan area of Phoenix, Arizona, we saw 8 of these larva-like creatures fall from a ceiling fan light fixture in a house near a kitchen - dining area. They are cream colored, approximately 1 cm long, and move (writhe) toward their small end. I cannot identify a well defined head or feet. They only exited the ceiling fan when the attached light unit was on.  We cannot identify any foul smelling odor emanating from the crawl space above the ceiling. Weather conditions this time of year are relatively moist (for a desert environment).  I just finished reviewing all of the photos on your website and hope my attached photos are not the larvae of a bot fly # 4536.  There are fruit rats in the Phoenix metro area   This is the time of year when fruit rats (also called roof rats) seek warmer nesting sites on elevated areas of houses. We have sealed all potentially accessible areas on our flat roof and had the roof checked by a rodent expert recently as a precaution. Thanks again for providing such a thorough and informative venue for people to learn more about etymology and be armed with knowledge instead of living in fear of the unknown. Ann
These are maggots, larvae of a muscoid fly. In spite of the absence of odor, there must be a food source for them somewhere in the space above the ceiling fan. If you have access to this space, you might have a look there. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

5140 I know it is in a plastic bag but I sprayed it with insecticide so I did not want to touch it. I also did not know if it may be poisonous and I have 3 dogs. It appears as though it is trying to hatch something and I didn't want that to escape. I would love to know what it is and if I should be concerned that I found it on the screen of my lanai. Luckily it was on the outside, but it was just under the edge of the roof. Thanks for your help, Candy.
You have killed a praying mantis, very beneficial insect that is entirely harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5139 This is Ricardo from Central New Jersey. We were vacuuming this morning, in December, when we noticed a number of these bugs along our baseboards running along the walls in our first floor space. They have a soft body and reach about 5mm in length. They leave a reddish brown stain when killed. We typically found them in clusters. We do have Boxelder bugs and Stink Bugs that typically attempt to infest our home in the fall/winter, but these are new to us. We would appreciate your help in identifying these.
These appear to be aphids, aka plant lice (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). These all are sap feeders, and ones as large as yours frequently are associated with trees. If you recently brought a Christmas tree into your abode, that might be the source. These insects will cause no harm to anything indoors. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5138 The photo was taken in my house in Vernon, British Columbia. We have found maybe a dozen of these in our dining room in the last two days. We have lived in this house for just over a year and have not seen them before. We have recently brought a live Christmas tree into our dining room.  These bugs have 6 legs, a segmented body, pincer shaped 'jaws' at the head. They are approximately 5-7 millimeters long. Brownish in colour. Any help in identifying them would be appreciated. Thanks,  Charlie.
This is a larva of a lacewing, maybe a brown lacewing (Neuroptera: Hemerobiidae). These insects, along with their relatives, green lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) are predators on other small, soft-bodied insects such as aphids and caterpillars, and thus usually considered as beneficial. See http://tinyurl.com/px83myb for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5137 Victoria BC this bug has been a pest. I have killed 5 already. They are found around my window  and on my couch which is by my window. I'm afraid they could be ticks or wood bugs. They are dead inside my lamp, but the ones on the floor beside the lamp are alive. I've found some on my wall and on my curtain. I have two dogs and keep a pretty clean house. This freaks me out. Victoria BC. Barbara
These appear to be drugstore beetles, Stegobium paniceum (Coleoptera: Anobiidae). These beetles along with their close look-alikes, cigarette beetles, will feed on an extremely wide range of organic materials, and can be pantry pests. See http://tinyurl.com/4hprj5f for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5136  Hi, please try to identify this bug for us, the closest thing I could find on your site was a cricket because of the muscular legs.  He or she  was found in the lower level bathroom under a wet towel. This is winter December 17 2014 in southern Alberta Canada. Thanks,  Tony
This looks like a camel cricket (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae) in the genus Phrixocnemis; they are harmless nuisance pests - see http://tinyurl.com/prd9vsd for an example.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5135  This spider gave a nasty bite, swelling and blotch  did occur. Please let me. know what it is, I've tried looking and found nothing today!  Thanks M. Archer.   Cobourg, Ontario,
This is a female triangulate household spider, Steatoda triangulosa (family Theridiidae), a very common and widespread species. Although some other species in this genus can deliver a very painful bite (personal experience), reports of this species biting humans appear nearly non-existent (see http://tinyurl.com/ouuyn3n and http://tinyurl.com/62ok832). If this is the spider that actually did the biting, it may be that the person bitten happens to be unusually sensitive to the spiderís venom. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5134  Hello,  I have come across this bug 3 times now in my apartment and need some help identifying. I had originally thought it was a random bug that flew in from outside, but having come across it now for the third time in the past week or so and need your help.  The bug is about 3/4 inch in length, narrow but has wings. The first one that I found was jumping around quite a bit, the second two did not move that quickly that i was able to snap this photo. i live in downtown Toronto in the Liberty Village area, Iím in a new condo development thatís just 1-2 years old on the 13th floor. Weather over the past week has been mild (0-3 degrees) and damp. I  would like your help in identifying this. Thank you, Ivana
This is a small, non-stinging wasp; one possibility is that it might be a male in the family Xiphydriidae - see
http://tinyurl.com/q8kzh76 for an example. At any rate, it is not a pest that you need worry about. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5133  The attached flying insect was seen at Skagway, Alaska about mid day on August 28, 2014. Assistance in identification will be appreciated. Thank you for this informative service.  Regards, Howard.
This is a flower/hover fly (Diptera: Syrphidae). There are many species in several genera that can have a similar appearance; see
http://tinyurl.com/m78s3zg for an example. The larvae of some species are predators on small, soft-bodied insects such as aphids, and the adult flies are good pollinators. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5132  I found this on the top of my bed. It was about the size of a dime. On top of the blanket. The light was on and it was just sitting there.  When I squished it, it crunched and looked like blood in it.  I searched for signs of bed bug. But found nothing in the cracks of my mattresses, mattress cover, etc. And only this one.  Please help me figure out what it is! Kristen.
This is a stink bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), it looks like a brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys, an introduced species that rapidly has become a widespread pest. In addition to causing damage to plants, especially developing fruit, they often enter buildings in search of shelter. See
http://tinyurl.com/nkexo3 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5131  Hi, my name is Caitlyn. I live on the southwest coast of Florida and have been seeing an influx of these large dark flying roaches. I'm not sure what to make of them. They are not what I would typically identify as a palmetto bug due to the yellow uniform specks lining it's abdomen. I have noticed them since construction of my shower wall. I don't know if it's a coincidence or not. All I do know is we haven't seen them in our house before.
This appears to be a nymph of an Australian cockroach, Periplaneta australasiae (Blattodea: Blattidae), see
http://tinyurl.com/kj9ykdk for an image. This is a tropical/subtropical species that has become widely distributed; they prefer warm, humid environments, so your shower area may be to their liking. See http://tinyurl.com/24vryq4 for some control suggestions. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5130 Hi, my name is Mark. I was in a business yard, south west side of Kitchener today and saw this strange spider walking across the asphalt.  Total size is like a toonie to the outside of its legs.   Haven't seen one like it before.
This is a female orb weaving spider in the genus Araneus; most likely Araneus trifolium a very common/widespread species that exhibits a wide range of variation in its colour pattern. See
http://tinyurl.com/p8utw55 for some images. All orb weavers are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5129  These insects are all over my outside wooden deck. They started to appear on October 15 in Moncton New Brunswick Canada. I have a lot of them on my deck.  Any help would be Appreciated.  Thanks, Brian
This appears to be an aphid (aka plant louse). They all are sap feeders, with the largest species usually associated with trees. Simply wash them off your deck with a strong stream of water from a garden hose. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5128  Hi - We are in Toronto, ON and found this bug today in the bathroom behind some wood trim that often gets wet (as it is beside the shower). It is pretty small and appears to have wings (it attempted to jump/ fly). We are in an old building and are worried about bed bugs and hope that someone can help us identify it. Thank you in advance. Jessie
this appears to be a small beetle rather than a bed bug, but a clearer image would be most helpful. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5127 I stepped on this bug on accident in my living room. It is upside down and dead. I have a young baby and would like to know if this bug is dangerous and if there could be more. Please help me!  Robyn
This is a centipede, a predatory arthropod in the class Chilopoda. All centipedes are venomous, but only a few tropical/subtropical species in the family Scolopendridae are capable of inflicting a medically significant bite. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5126 Can you identify this one and are they dangerous? Sincerely. Jim in southern Ontario
This appears to be a woodlouse spider, Dysdera crocata (family Dysderidae). These spiders prey mainly on terrestrial crustaceans in the order Isopoda (commonly known as woodlice, sowbugs, pillbugs, roly polys, etc.), using their very large fangs to pierce the tough exoskeletons of their victims. They are not dangerous to humans; see
http://tinyurl.com/6sjaczh for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5125  These fleas were found covering a dog on Dec 5-14. The dog is from Wetaskiwin AB. The body is white with dark head and extremities. If you could tell me the species of flea that would be most helpful. Erin
Unfortunately a species determination is not possible from your image. The commonest flea species found on dogs are the cat flea, Ctenocephalides  felis, the dog flea, Ctenocephalides  canis, and the human flea, Pulex irritans. With a good magnifying glass, you can separate Ctenocephalides from Pulex by the presence of thick, dark setae that appear as prominent comb-like features on the head and thorax of Ctenocephalides  species. Compare the images at
http://tinyurl.com/odesq5o (Ctenocephalides) and http://tinyurl.com/ppv7au6 (Pulex). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5124 Hello my name is Diana and I live in Lancaster California I have found this bug in my room and my daughters room and I'm petrified that it's a bed. Bug. It's small and brown and has light brown stripes going across it. Please help me to find out why kind of bug this is.
This is a cast Ďskiní (exuvium) of a carpet beetle larva. From its appearance, it is quite possible that an adult beetle already has emerged from a pupa that would have formed within the cast skin. See
http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for some general control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5123  Hello! We rent an apartment in a four plex in Minneapolis, Minnesota. We started noticing these this past week. There have been over a handful of them individually noticed in our kitchen. We are clean people and we are terrified they might be roaches! Please help! Katherine.
Like no. 5122, this also is a young nymph of a German cockroach (Blattella germanica); see
http://tinyurl.com/mffnvgc for a University of Minnesota Extension Service fact sheet on cockroaches. The presence of these cockroaches is not indicative of unsanitary conditions, as they are very adept at Ďhitchhikingí their way in. Also, achieving complete control in apartment buildings and other multiple unit facilities can be quite difficult. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5122  Is this a bed bug?  If not, what is it please.  Jessica.
This is a young nymph of a cockroach, most likely a German cockroach (Blattella germanica); see
http://tinyurl.com/p46el9 for an image and http://tinyurl.com/7velhwo elsewhere on the pestcontrolcanada web pages for control suggestions. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5121  What is this ?   Karl.
This is a moth pupa of some kind, possibly in the family Noctuidae; see
http://tinyurl.com/k5hcpk3 for an example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5120  This small bug is about 7mm in length.  Jim T.
This is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) in the genus Zelus. These are general predators on other small arthropods, and thus usually considered as beneficial. See
http://tinyurl.com/l8zgevk for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5119   7 mm, found indoors on a package containing clothes sent from Ontario.  I just can't figure it out!  Thanks!!!  Cindy. 
This is a seed bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Lygaeidae); possibly a birch catkin bug (Kleidocerys resedae)  see
http://tinyurl.com/l8u8h7b for an image and http://tinyurl.com/nytp5tk for more detailed information.. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5118  Taken 12-5-14,  Las Cruces, NM.  3/8" long   Mickey
Nice find! This is a female webspinner (order Embioptera). They construct tube-like structures with silk produced by glands in their front tarsi (the fat portion of the forelegs easily seen in your image), and they seldom leave these shelters. See
http://tinyurl.com/nxqsttv for more detailed information on these fascinating insects. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5117 I found about 20 of these on the kitchen floor some were bigger and some were really small looked like they didn't have any legs had like ridges on its body and a open mouth.  Amy.
These appear to be larvae of crane flies (Diptera: Tipulidae); their Ďopen mouthí actually is their tail end where their breathing spiracles are located. In the image at
http://tinyurl.com/mqvuyvp, the head end is at upper left and the tail end is at lower right. See also http://tinyurl.com/lh2wmnh for a close-up of a tail end. What is unusual here is finding them indoors. Are there any portions of the kitchen floor or immediately adjacent areas where very damp/water-logged wood is present? Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
  5116  Hi,  My name is Kim and I'm located in a suburb of Atlanta.  Any assistance you can offer in identifying the attached bugs that are plaguing my home would be greatly appreciated.  One of them is biting but not sure which one may be the culprit.  Each of these were found inside.  The last photo appears to be a cocoon of some type.  I have many more photos if needed.  Thank you.
Neither of these are likely to have caused any Ďmystery bitesí; the one on the left appears to be a crane fly (Diptera: Tipulidae) that has lost nearly all of its appendages and the one on the right is a very dead earwig (order Dermaptera). Crane flies cannot bite and earwigs primarily are scavengers on decomposing organic matter but sometimes may feed on other small arthropods. See
http://tinyurl.com/cfew3n and http://tinyurl.com/kpg5ndx for additional information on crane flies and earwigs, respectively. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5115 Hello I recently moved to Texas and I see a lot of different bugs around but today I was cleaning my bathroom and I looked down on the floor where I have a bath mat and found around 8 of theses little bugs and they look gross they are furry on there back but they are making me nervous bc I have a new born and need to no what the are can they bite and what can I do to rid my home of them someone please help me 
This is a larva of a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae); looks like an Anthrenus sp. (variegated carpet beetle and allies). These can be difficult to control because of their widely varying food preferences. See
http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for some general control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5114  Hello, I'm in East Texas & the temperature here has been mostly in the 40s the past month but today increased to the 60s.  I went to sit on the couch today & this guy stung or bit me on the leg! It was pretty painful for about an hour but then subsided! Not sure what he is or if I should be worried about more being in the house! Any help would be appreciated!  Joseph.
This is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae), apparently in the genus Zelus - see
http://tinyurl.com/mvrou8o for an example. The saliva of these insects contains proteolytic enzymes that serve to break down the tissues of their prey; this is what causes the severe pain associated with the bites of these insects. However, their bites are not dangerous to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5113  Hi, thank you for looking at my photo.  There are many of these in my vegetable garden, I live on the west side of  Washington state.  They are silver/gray colored and pretty small.  When disturbed they coil up as you can partially see in this image.  I would like to know what they and if they are beneficial to my vegetable garden not.  I usually find them around roots or underground crops at all times of the year. Thanks!  Tami
This is a millipede, an arthropod in the class Diplopoda. The vast majority of these are harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter, but some species occasionally will damage very tender vegetation, such as very ripe fruit (strawberries, for example) especially when very near to or in contact with soil. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5112 Good morning from Europe (Athens, Greece)..
I found this really weird insect in my house, and i 'd like to learn what kind of worm is this..
Thank you...Όλια
This is a case-bearing caterpillar in the family Tineidae; it most likely is a case-bearing clothes moth, Tinea pellionella (Lepidoptera: Tineidae), see
http://tinyurl.com/mszvx3w for an image. The caterpillar of the household casebearer (Phereoeca sp.; Lepidoptera: Tineidae) is quite similar, but the shape of its case and he appearance of the body segments immediately behind the head are slightly different - see http://tinyurl.com/ov7pnox for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5111  Hi, I was shopping one day in my local supermarket and I ran across this insect. I really would like to know what kind of insect is this...  Chris.
This is a mole cricket (Orthoptera: Gryllotalpidae); they spend much of their time underground, usually emerging only at night. Some species can be serious turf pests, see
http://tinyurl.com/ol9jjse for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5110  Please find attached two pictures of a bug I found in my condo bathroom. I live in Toronto where it's early winter. These bugs have been here since we moved in this past summer. They are extremely small. So small that I didn't want to kill or attempt to subdue it in any way for fear of disintegrating the body. This was shot with a 100mm macro lens on a crop (1.6) sensor camera, so I'd estimate the bug's size at maybe 1mm. Any info on what it is, how it can be controlled and any concerns we should/n't have would be greatly appreciated. Sincerely, Reggie
This is a booklouse (Psocodea: Liposcelidae), a very common nuisance pest. They feed primarily on mold spores and the like, but occasionally may damage book bindings and other starchy materials. They most often are found in damp/humid areas. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5109  We have found several of these in our basement, they are approximately 1 cm long, black and move very quickly.  We believe they give off some pungent smell when squished (our cat runs away).  We live in Abbotsford, BC.  Thanks to all of you entomologists! Sharon.
This is a rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae). They are general predators on other small arthropods and thus usually considered as beneficial. Some species do emit a defensive secretion when threatened, and in the case of some in the subtribe Paederina, especially in the genus Paederus, the secretion can be very irritating tender skin and mucous membrane tissue - see http://tinyurl.com/7cl5ck5 for details. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5108 Hello,  Thank you for time at identifying pests. I live in Riverside California and about 10pm this evening next to my baby daughter this bug was crawling up the family room wall, head to tail (1 inch length). Please let me if it's poisonous or is it a cricket?  We are wondering if possible it came buy firewood logs we buy for the fireplaces in the house or could we be having a pest problem.  Kindest regards, Rosemary
This is a true cricket (Orthoptera: Gryllidae); possibly a tropical house cricket in the genus Gryllodes - see http://tinyurl.com/qa8lv6x for some examples. They have spread widely from their ancestral home (presumably Southeast Asia), and are completely harmless to humans. No control/concern should be necessary. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5107 My name is Mike, i live in an apartment in Chicago, Illinois.  These insects are poor at flying and are always found on walls.  The photo you see is of a dead insect. They have very long, fragile legs. They just appeared out of nowhere this late autumn.  It has also been very cold this autumn.  We find them far from each other, and just hanging out on walls by themselves. 
This is a male crane fly (Diptera: Tipulidae). Although it bears some resemblance to species in the genus Nephrotoma (see http://tinyurl.com/os3er8u for an example), this is a huge family with thousands of species, only a few of which are distinctive enough to hazard a specific identification from images alone. The flies themselves are completely harmless, but the larvae (Ďleatherjacketsí) of a few species in the genus Tipula can be serious turf pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5106  Hello,  I am Nazmus, from Edmonton, Alberta. Suddenly from yesterday I am seeing some insects walking on my hardwood floor, some are already dead. They are of size around 1/8" to 1/4". Its end of November, very cold weather with temperature around -20'celcius to -30'celcius. They are mostly around the room heaters.  Thanks & Regards. 
This is another common sow bug.  See the information below (#5105)
5105  Hi..My name is Al and this pic was taken in Waterloo, Ontario. I had just had my basement redone....new carpet and underpad , some new furniture and noticed these bugs on the carpet and along baseboards just this week (November 20th). Right now they only seem to be in the basement.  
These are sow bugs. If you did not install a vapor barrier in the basement before building walls inside the concrete walls, you have created high humidity cavities that are an ideal environment for sow bugs. They breath through gills and need moisture to survive.  They die if they crawl out into your living space.  Read more on our sow bug page.
5104  Hi I found this bug actually crawling on a friend today who was visiting. It is November and we have had a cold snap. I have no idea what it is and am hoping it is not a bed bug.
This is a nymph of a cockroach, perhaps a Periplaneta sp. such as the American cockroach - see
http://tinyurl.com/2fdmdsl for images and more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5103  hi, i found a few of those bugs in my daughter's bedroom, on the window sill.  we're located in Montrťal, Quebec, and winter is here (Nov. 2014).  they were able to fly a bit, were walking quite fast, and it had almost a greenish silvery back (which you can see on one of the pictures).  I'd like to know its name, why it's in the house, and how to get rid of  them.  Thanks for that great resource.  Sebastian
The image is not clear enough for me to be certain, but it looks like a red-legged ham beetle (Necrobia rufipes; Coleoptera: Cleridae) - see
http://tinyurl.com/pxwlebv for an image. The vast majority of beetles in this family are general predators on other small arthropods and thus usually considered as beneficial. This species appears to be one of the rare exceptions, as these beetles will feed on a wide variety of human foodstuffs, including smoked/cured meats as well as on other food-infesting insects - see http://tinyurl.com/k54cesj for more details. Sanitation is key to control; regular vacuuming of the premises and storing all infestable foodstuffs in sealable insect-proof containers or under refrigeration should keep them from being anything other than a minor annoyance. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5102  This bug was comparatively large,   one to one and a half inches long.    Thx   Mike s.
This is a wheel bug, Arilus cristatus (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae), the largest assassin bug in this neck of the woods. It is a general predator on other arthropods (mainly other insects), and thus usually considered as beneficial. It is capable of a very painful Ďbiteí (actually more of a stab) if handled carelessly. See http://tinyurl.com/r3jvp7 for images and more information on these fascinating creatures. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
5101 This is less than a 1/2 inch in size. Hangs on my outside door frames and outside windows. Have seen them from spring until now, Nov. 3rd. I live in south western NC. Thanks, Tammy
Unfortunately, I have no good idea as to what this might be; I cannot even tell whether it is insect- or plant-related. I can only suggest that you take some of these to your county office of North Carolinaís Cooperative Extension Service to see if anyone there can be of assistance; see
http://tinyurl.com/cc5vq2hfor links to contact information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

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