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I just want to thank you for providing such a good resource for bug identification!! I searched and googled and searched over and over again for help identifying a hard shell worm/beetle infest, and thankfully I finally found your website!!!!!  It seems one out of ten questions is on the same pest as I have, but, it was very hard to find anything on it at all.  You provided detailed information, actual pictures to look at, and other recourses to search on the pest. This is greatly appreciated. Many thanks to  Ed Saugstad for offering opinion and providing  info (over and over again, it seems to be a popular pest) I am so happy to finally find something useful and direct to the point.  Many thanks to you!!!!   Glenda from Minnesota

 

Hi, 
I just wanted to say. Your website is amazing! I visit it so often that I've recommended it to others too. It is clear that no other website can compare to it. And does Ed Saugstad help with the website too? He pretty much answers everyone's questions and if it's just a hobby of his to answer bug questions for others then he's amazing too. Big thanks to you and Ed for keeping the website alive.
 Cheers!
Christine

Dearest Mr. Cross
I live in Mass. and have been terrified that I have been getting kissing bugs and have even contacted the CDC then I stumbled on to your site and began searching.  After over one hundred bugs later I found the Western conifer seed bug and I began to breath again.  Thank you so much for this site.  It is a true blessing.
Sincerely
Martha

 

THANK YOU!  I tried over a dozen bug ID sites.  None were as helpful as yours.  We ID'ed "our" bug based on your response to someone from Manchester, England. The Drugstore beetle was a match.  The hint about dog food and sry goods helped us find the infestation in the dog bisuits.  We have been finding them all over the house, but mostly on light colored surfaces or near lighting fixtures in the evening.  I feel so much better having figured this out, which I could not have done without your site. THANK YOU!
Katy

 

Thank you for maintaining this fabulously informative web site and thanks also to Ed Saugstad the retired entomologist, who replies with such useful information so freely!  It is all very much appreciated. Sandra. Quinte West, Ontario. 

 

 

 

 

 


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4974 This grackle has at least two insects in its beak but it's the yellow winged one I'm trying to identify.  I hope it's clear enough for an ID.  Location: Ontario, Canada, about 40 mile northwest of Toronto.  Thank you. John. 
4973 I found both these guys in two seperate drawers in my dresser the brown looking one was already dead. Freaking out just the thought that they were in my clothes now i have to wash all over again. Are these guys harmful? 
4972 I found this beetle this evening in my driveway in Carlisle ON.   It caught my eye because of its size: nearly an inch. It was alive, but not by much. Its front right leg was mangled, and it moved slowly, trying to evade the ants which were already making a meal of it. It did manage to evade them eventually, but seemed to be close to death. I've been through my books, and spent some time online, but have not been able to identify it. I'd appreciate your help. Thank you, Billi-Jean
4971 Taken in York Region, Ontario July 28, 2012 (farm country). Appears to be a cross between a house fly and a grasshopper kinda thingy.
4970  I found this on my BBQ cover.  It is about a 1 1/2 inches long.  Can you tell me what this is? Jack
4969  My name is Tracy, I planted a garden and potatoes for the first time 2 years ago.  These were present then.  I originally thought is was a scab... went to pick at it and it had arms and legs!!!! Went to capture one (I thought of these) and and it flew! It eats holes in the potato leaf.  I didn't plant potatoes last year but they showed up again with this year's planting of potatoes.  Spotted one on a tomato plant too.  This bug was captured July 7th, 2014.  The summer has been more cool and rainy than overly hot and dry in that garden. We are an hour north of Kingston, ON.  The garden is partially shaded, lots of maple trees in the area.  Good Luck, and thanks.
This is a clavate tortoise beetle, Plagiometriona clavata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae); see http://tinyurl.com/pjvd9kl for an image and http://tinyurl.com/3o2lqsm for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4968  HELLO there we have discovered this pest the other day and now when we were coming home last night we spotted over 15 of them  on the stairs  around and behind the baseboard on the back entrance of our home. we live in a 4 level split home that entrance point is what we use as a mudroom. I have also sent you pic of the area where I removed the baseboard and it shows that I have caulk it last night. but I found 3 more this morning. pls help  us on what they are and how to get ride of them thank you.  I LIVE IN CAPE BRETON  NOVA SCOTIA. 
This is a darkling beetle (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), it looks like one of the mealworms in the genus Tenebrio; see http://tinyurl.com/o3amxmp for an example. They basically are scavengers, but can become pests of stored grains; their larvae will also feed on a variety of organic materials, including meat scraps, dead insects, and feathers. See http://tinyurl.com/mkjyqjv for more detailed information including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4967  I though it might be a Japanese beetle or potato beetle it ate all the plants at the side of my house. 
This appears to be Lema daturaphila, a leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) known as the three-lined potato beetle. See http://tinyurl.com/pzxkquj for an image and http://tinyurl.com/owsqtla for more detailed information including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4966 I really hope you can help.  I looked through the spider section of your web page, and couldn't find this one. We live in Nanaimo B.C. And have seen a few strange types that I've found on your site. But never one like this guy who was found in our basement where the kids play. Just want to know what he or she is, and if dangerous at all for the kids. Thanks so much. Kelly Muir.
This is a hacklemesh weaver (family Amaurobiidae) in the genus Callobius; it looks like Callobius severus  see http://tinyurl.com/qjtd6sh for an image. They are not dangerous to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4965  I found this in the skimmer of the swimming pool in Richmond Hill, Ontario.  its about 3 inches long   havent got any idea what it is but it has 2 eyes. Terry.
This looks like a leopard slug that fell into the pool and drowned. See http://tinyurl.com/25rcoae for images of living specimens and detailed information on their biology. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4964  I am from St. Catharines Ontario I have never seen a beetle like this before it has wings and is the size of a Twoonie. It is late July.  Tamara
looks like Osmoderma eremicola (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae). Known as the hermit flower beetle, their larvae develop in punky, rotting wood; see http://tinyurl.com/oumgtls for details on its life cycle.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4963  Group of grubs found during tree management in mixed forest in cut stump of large dead beech tree in  Haliburton  area, Ontario Canada.  Bill.
These are larvae of beetles, most likely in the family Scarabaeidae (such as an Osmoderma sp.; see http://tinyurl.com/mg5l4gm) or possibly Lucanidae (stag beetles; see http://tinyurl.com/omc6c7n for an example).  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4962  My name jerry Barrens  picture taken in our garden tsawwassen  July 20 2014  BC.   Please can you tell my what kind off beetle this is thank you very  much  
These look like red soldier beetles (Rhagonycha fulva; Coleoptera: Cantharidae), an introduced species. See http://tinyurl.com/m3q4es9 for images and more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4961 Hello, I live on the 12th floor in Vancouver Canada's west end. I few months ago I made a little garden on my patio. Within the first month all my plants had died ( and we love our plants and take good care of them). Last week I replanted the bed and found all these 3/4" bugs living in the roots of the plants. I replaced the soil and they are back killing my new plants. Could you A.) tell me what this is, and B.) suggest a good way to get rid of them. Greatly appreciated. Regards, Marc.
These are pupae of moths, and as such are incapable of inflicting any damage. However, if the caterpillars that preceded them were cutworms, they may have been responsible. Exactly what form did the damage take?  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4960  We saw this bug on a warm, sunny, summer's day in Calgary, basking on a rock by a creek.  It was several cm's long and we've never seen anything like it.  Would be grateful for an ID!  Thanks.  Hannah
This is an exuvium (shed exoskeleton) of an immature stonefly (order Plecoptera). The immature stages (nymphs/naiads) are aquatic, often found under rocks on stream bottoms. When fully grown, they crawl out of the water and after a short while, the exoskeleton spits open and the adult winged insect emerges. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4959  Hi – we are in Alberta, Edmonton area, and we found this insect on our acreage July 12, 2014.  It has been really warm here over this last week (25c +) and we are expecting another warm day.  We would appreciate if you could help us identify it.  Thanks for your time!  We appreciate it!  Rob ‘n Sherri
This is an elm sawfly, Cimbex americana (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae); see http://tinyurl.com/nutk5eh for images and more detailed information. Their larvae (see http://tinyurl.com/ne37esh for an example) often are mistaken for caterpillars. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4958 I've seen a few of these spiders in my basement, the one pictured is one of the larger ones I've seen no more then a inch in size. Not many webs have been seen other then the usual ones in the unfinished part of the basement. We are located in the city of Ottawa Ontario. I hope I can be helped to identify it!  Thanks Erik
This is a male funnel weaver spider (family Agelenidae); it appears to be a barn funnel weaver, Tegenaria domestica. They are not dangerous to humans. See http://tinyurl.com/5owuzh for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4957  These beetle type insect has just started flying up from the ground 4 floors below outside on my deck. They seem to come out just prior to dusk and last for a half hour or so. They seem slow and kinda bounce off the various decks nearby including mine. They have been out for a week or two so far and can be approx 30 to 40 flying around our deck at once. The weather has been slightly dry for the last week or so here in Halifax Nova Scotia.  Keith. 
This a beetle in the family Scarabaeidae that belongs to a grouping of species collectively known as May beetles or June bugs; it appears to be in the genus Phyllophaga. The larvae (“white grubs” of some species can be very serious lawn/turf pests as they feed on roots of grasses just below the soil surface. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4956  This was taken in Langford, BC (suburb of Victoria, BC). It's HUGE. A kind stranger took the photos for me because I didn't want to get close. This was a minimum of 3 inches in length - perhaps between 3 inches and 4 inches long. There are dead ten-lined June beetles all over the garage floor (just outside of photo), and they look like ants compared to this monster. Can you tell me what this is? Does it fly? And when do these start dying off?  Thanks. Nicole
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae; it looks like a California root borer, Prionus californicus. See http://tinyurl.com/kl9t6wl for an image and detailed information on its life history. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4955  What is this. Found in my bed by my hair. Jane M.
This looks like a very mangled cockroach nymph. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4954  I am attaching a photo of a bug that I've seen 3x. First time was during a visit in Hamilton, ON in May 2014. Woke up and found this little sucker on my arm. It was quite attached. Had to pry it off. There was no bite mark or any symptoms of any kind of bite after the fact though. The second time I saw it was on a blanket in Vancouver, BC...this was a day after I came home to Vancouver from Hamilton. Maybe it followed me? But then I saw the EXACT bug on my dog. He got really ill recently and I thought it was ironic that this all happened and this bug was hanging around. My dog subsequently died of a liver related illness. Wonder if it has anything to do with the bug. Luckily I snapped a photo because I thought the bug was so odd....   Thanks,  JENNA. 
This is a hard tick (family Ixodidae) in the genus Dermacentor such as the common wood tick, Dermacentor variabilis - see No. 4929 for another example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4953  Hello, My name is Al and I found this little guy dead on my basement floor a couple of days ago. July 2014. I think I killed two in the house believing that they were flying carpenter ants which I don’t want. The geographic location is Ottawa, Ontario. I looked through all your photos and this may be some kind of parasite wasp (#4805), but I am not sure. The attached picture tries to show the very curly and distinct antenna. Is this a specific kind of juvenile wasp? Great resource. Thanks for this service.
This looks like a spider wasp (Hymenoptera; Pompilidae); see http://tinyurl.com/ppvynyx for an example from Toronto. These wasps seek out and paralyze spiders that they then take to their burrow to serve as food for their larvae. Your specimen likely wandered indoors accidentally. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4952  Found on the island of Montreal in the backyard of a residential area (Verdun). First noticed them around early July, they are still clustered as of mid-July.  They only seem to cluster either on a plant with small yellow flowers or on this vine in the photo. Thanks, Jonathan
These are aphids (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). Commonly known as plant lice, they are sap feeders and some are important vectors of plant diseases. They usually can be controlled by washing them off plants with a strong stream of water from a garden hose, or an application of an insecticidal soap. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4951  These beetle like bugs  are in abundance in our backyard in Windsor Ontario. There are maybe fifty of them chewing the leaves. Just noticed them this year. Can you identify them please. many thanks. Dennis
These are Japanese beetles (Popillia japonica; Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae), a very destructive introduced species. See http://tinyurl.com/2chqwmv for detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4950  Last summer and now again this summer, we are starting to catch lots of these in our house (starting in June and going through to September last year).  They are a little brown moth, maybe 1 inch long.  Mostly we find them sitting on something (they like brown towels).  The leave a dusty mark if you try to touch or pick them up.  I'm trying to figure out how they are all getting in!  What are they?  Thanks in advance.  Peter.  Mississauga, Ontario.  
Although I cannot offer a specific i.d. for this moth, at least it does not appear to be any of the cosmopolitan pest species that would infest anything in a home. I suspect that they are finding their way in through any available opening after being attracted to lights at night. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4949 I found this little guy crawling around my bed while I was retiring for the night. It was in May, and the weather was clear. He had a total leg span of an inch or so, and a brownish yellowish color. I live in the North Vancouver, BC area, and see spiders like this entering my home on occasion. What is this little guy called? And will I or my cat be safe if accidently bitten?   I hope to get a response soon, thank you for your time.  Ryan.
This is an arachnid in the order Opiliones - see http://tinyurl.com/qgjn9hs for an example. Commonly known as harvestmen or daddy long-legs, they lack venom glands and are harmless. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4948 Here is a picture of the spider I found in my chives this summer. I've never seen a pure white one like this before. Any idea?  It was taken June 2014 in North-Eastern Ontario, in Timmins Ontario  Thanks, Chrissy
This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae), possibly a goldenrod crab spider; see http://tinyurl.com/lv39adj for an image. This species shows considerable individual variation in colouration. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4947   Several of these guys have emerged from an old sitka spruce log this June. They are 3cm in length. We live on southern Vancouver island. I can't find anything that looks like it online.  Thanks,  Doug
This is Ulochaetes leoninus, a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) known as the lion beetle; see http://tinyurl.com/qgzx545 for images.  It appears to be a wasp mimicking species.. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4946  This flying beetle landed on chair that’s on my sundeck. Location: Nanaimo on Vancouver Island, British Columbia.  Picture was taken in Mid June 2014.
This is Sinodendron rugosum (Coleoptera: Lucanidae), known as the rugose stag beetle. See http://tinyurl.com/n4mrxq4 for an image and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4945  My name is Katie, and I'm from Watrous, Saskatchewan.  Picture taken July 1st, outside.  These flying beetles are all over MANY of my shrubs outside: mountain ash, roses, double flowering plum, tatarian maple, etc. They drop to the ground if you disturb them.  They appear either green or light brown/gold, with black heads/upper body. 
This is a scarab beetle in the genus Dichelonyx, perhaps D. canadensis  (see http://tinyurl.com/nkqswlk for an image; species in this genus are notoriously difficult to separate). They will feed on a wide variety of foliage. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4944  My name is Camilla and i live in Nc i found this bug in my closet and wonder if I should get someone out to spray or if this could have just been a random bug that got lost. 
This is Eburia quadrigeminata, a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) commonly known as the ivory-marked beetle or ivory-marked borer. Their larvae develop in the wood of dead hardwood trees such as oaks, maple, hickory, or ash; they will not infest your home and there is no need to apply any control.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4943  Prince Edward Island, Canada. I keep finding these tiny beetles around the apartment year round, but mostly near the bathroom sink or more alarmingly under the bed sheets and pillow. They are on average about an eighth of an inch in length or smaller. They are black with a shell and translucent brown wings sometimes protruding from the rear. They are shaped like a sleek elongated sesame seed. The legs seem to be tucked under the main body when moving, almost not visible in it’s profile. They have two small antennae visible in their profile. I included a drawing with info, and unfortunately because of the speed of these little guys, the photo shows this one a little worse for wear. He is missing one leg and one antennae on the right and his shell is open with the wings showing. (I tried to stop him from running off the 1/4” ruled page for the photo, but he kind of took a beating). Even with the hard shell, these guys are quite fragile.  Thank you,  Byron
This appears to be one of the grain beetles in the genus Oryzaephilus, either a saw-toothed (O. surinamensis) or merchant (O. mercator) grain beetle. They feed primarily on damaged grains or grain-derived dry stored food products, and can become pantry pests. See http://tinyurl.com/m99jkh4 for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4942  This little guy isn't bothering me, my son just wanted to know what it was...we found him on the kids' swings in our backyard in Glenora, Edmonton this past weekend. Any idea of his/her genus, species, name...habits etc..? Thanks. 
This is a pupa of a lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in the genus Anatis - see http://tinyurl.com/qay6nrd for an example. This genus includes the largest species of lady beetle in North America. They are more often found in trees than on low-laying vegetation; they feed primarily on aphids but will also take small caterpillars and sawfly larvae.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4941  Found in Rhode island USA.  Jacklyn. 
This is a female (its ovipositor is extended) long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the subfamily Prioninae; it looks like a broad-necked root borer, Prionus laticollis. See
http://tinyurl.com/qa5mrz6 for an image and  for detailed information on its life history.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. http://tinyurl.com/m7ldh8q
4940  We love in Hoyt NB  Canada.. it all started last year when i had a napkin that had had banana bread remnus on  it and a day later it was covered in flour beetles and we noticed they have come back again this year and also the bugs i sent in the pic.. we have been spraying in our room where most of the are found and sprayed that corner of the house. Sometimes the spray works and kills them but mostly draws them out..please help.. thanks.. Amanda
This is yet another Dermestes larva; must be an epidemic! See no. 4938.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4939  Attached is a photo of a small 2-10 mm crawler that I am finding more and more of in my home (everywhere!). I have lived in the home for 14 years and this is the first I have seem of them. They crawl like a centipede but have only 3 sets of front legs, and are very "fuzzy" as you can see in the photo.  What are they!? Why do I have them!? What can I do!?   Peter
This is another Dermestes larva; see no. 4938. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4938  Found these bugs on our carpet inside our Log home. Can you please identify the type of bugs and how to get rid of them. Thanks,  Jurgen
This is a larva of a beetle in the family Dermestidae and the genus Dermestes (larder beetle and allies). These larvae will feed on such a wide variety of organic materials that complete control can be difficult. See
http://tinyurl.com/p7zqooo for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4937 These insects are have been swarming on the front of our house in a Toronto for a few weeks now, especially behind the mailbox. Can you tell me what it is and how to deter it? Thanks.
This is a wasp of some sort, but it does not appear to be of the type that would pose a stinging hazard. If you could provide clearer images, including a side view, I might be able to i.d. it further. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4936 My name is Colton this spider was found on the side of a road in Monte lake BC.
This is a female wolf spider (family Lycosidae) with her newly hatched babies on her back. See
http://tinyurl.com/qxnhswk for an image and http://tinyurl.com/yqmo6z for detailed information on these fascinating creatures. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4935 I'm in Prince George British Columbia and this little guy is on my fennel.  What is he. Thanks,  Tania.
This is another lady beetle larva.  See #4934.
4934 I have these bugs all over from small to larger (1cm). I'm from Winnipeg MB and this pic was taken in July of this year.
This is a larva of a lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), but I am uncertain as to species. Ones like this specimen are predators on other small, soft-bodied arthropods (such as aphids), and thus usually considered beneficial.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4933  Please identify this bug for me, I found it after it bit me. I live in Vancouver BC Canada.  Adam.
This is a larva of a green lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), a voracious predator on aphids, small caterpillars and other small, soft-bodied arthropods. See
http://tinyurl.com/lrzpkr6 for images and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4932  Please see attached pic of bug that we are seeing  for the past month.     90 % of the time they are in my roommate's bedroom-on his walls, top of bed.  He says they come out much more at night.  He doesn't have any bites.  We see them in living room and hall sometimes.    We are in Toronto.  Please advise.  thanks,  A.
This is either a bed bug, Cimex  (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Cimicidae) or a bat bug (). They are very similar in appearance, but your image is too blurry to tell the difference; see
http://tinyurl.com/qnz3oz for detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4931 we live in Lebanon, tn  and have never seen this before- its blue and red and black! if you click on photo it gets bigger and it is a really clear pic . thanks for your help! please email me back when you get an answer.- Vicki and Sean
This is a nymph of a leaf-footed bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae), it looks like an Acanthocephala sp. - see http://tinyurl.com/o3quw2t for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4930  This bug was found crawling on my bathroom ceiling in New Hampshire. I found a few days after I found a dying dog tick in the same room. It's late spring. We have an indoor-only cat whose litter box is located in that bathroom. We went hiking four days ago, with Permethrin on our hiking clothes.  Thank you!  Mary
This is a pseudoscorpion, an arachnid related to spiders, scorpions, etc. They are general predators on other small arthropods, and unlike true scorpions, lack venom glands and are completely harmless to humans. See http://tinyurl.com/lubjn5 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4929  June 18 2014 in Kitchener Ontario.  Kris.
This is a hard tick (family Ixodidae) in the genus Dermacentor such as the common wood tick, Dermacentor variabilis - see http://tinyurl.com/mra8hn7 for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4928 It was between 1 1/2 to 2 inches found in central Wisconsin. Michael.
This is the cast ‘skin’ (exuvium) of a dragonfly naiad (the aquatic immature stage). See http://tinyurl.com/ogqdmhq for images of the dragonfly’s life cycle. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4927  It was hard not to notice this large caterpillar crossing our trail.  We are in Victoria, BC. June 20, grassy path, sunny 20°CDark green back with yellow spots and brighter green underside.  Red horn on the rear end with brown head and back end.  He was a good 8-10 cm in length, fat and solid looking.  The closest match in photos that I could find was to a ceratomia catalpae but it’s not “quite right”.  Tonicha
This is a caterpillar of a sphinx moth (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae) in the genus Hyles - see http://tinyurl.com/morqgdzfor an example. Larvae in this genus have extremely variable colour patterns. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4926  Jim sends you this picture from Red Deer Alberta, I believe it is an assassin bug, but which one. It is having a spider for lunch?
This is not an assassin bug, it is a nymph of a boxelder bug (Boisea sp.; Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Rhopalidae), common nuisance species. See http://tinyurl.com/nak542z for images and detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4925  Hi there, Found this insect flying around my kitchen yesterday and I had never seen it before. Came across the website and thought this would be perfect to get it identified as my internet searching turned up at nothing. I live on Vancouver Island, B.C. in Port McNeill on the north end. Weather was a fairly sunny and warm day and we have lots of trees in the area combined with some marshy areas about a half kilometer away. Had my doors open for a bit around mid day, guessing that is when it flew in. Insect size is around 30mm long or so from head to end of "tail" -Paul.
This is a clear-winged moth (Lepidoptera: Sesiidae); it appears to be in the genus Synanthedon. At least 11 species in this genus have been reported from British Columbia, their caterpillars bore into the trunks/stems of many different trees and shrubs and some, like the peach tree borer, can be serious pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4924  Just found this slow clingy spider in a t-shirt whilst on vacation on S.  Pender Island, BC.  What kind of spider is this? Annabel
This is a hacklemesh weaver (family Amaurobiidae) in the genus Callobius; it looks like Callobius severus  see
http://tinyurl.com/n4gkamj for an image. They are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4923 This awesome golden beetle landed on my shirt, then hung around on my son's hand for a few minutes.  What is it? Brent.
This is a metallic wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Buprestidae); it appears to be in the genus Dicerca - see
http://tinyurl.com/nudvwnq for images and more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4922 Found 5 or more of these in my bedroom on my desk around some food crumbs. Ants have been appearing here but never seen this kind. What is it?  Bryon
This is a larva of a lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae), possibly that of Harmonia axyridis, known as the Asian multi-colored lady beetle; see
http://tinyurl.com/jvozom8 for an image. As these insects are predators on small, soft-bodied insects such as aphids, it seems a bit odd that they would be attracted to your food crumbs.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4921  This guy came crashing into our gazebo this afternoon, he’s about 2½” long and 1” wide.  Thought it was a hummingbird at first when it was flying towards us. Wasn’t able to fly again after the crash.  Rural Eastern Ontario June 26 2014. Sunny 26 degrees Celsius.  Dave
This is a giant water bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Belostomatidae); aka toe biter or electric light bug. They are predators on other aquatic life, primarily other insects, but also sometimes minnows and tadpoles, and can inflict a very painful ‘bite’ if mishandled. Also, they are strong fliers and can be found quite some distance from water. See 
http://tinyurl.com/qg3ah82 for an image and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4920 Could someone please tell what this is. I have been looking for a couple of weeks now and can not find out what it is. Its about the size of a tic, found one only. Steve.
This is a pseudoscorpion, a tiny arachnid related to spiders, scorpions, etc. They are general predators on other small arthropods, and unlike true scorpions, lack venom glands and are completely harmless to humans. See
http://tinyurl.com/lubjn5 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4919 Hi my name is Crystal from Edmonton, Alberta and we seem to have a fly invasion within the house over the past month. This is a dead one taken with a 60x "microscope" lens over my camera. Hopefully you can identify as they are very small about .5-1 mm and thus hard to capture. They don't respond to fly bait such as sticky ribbon or sugar water. I haven't tried apple cider vinegar trap as from this picture it doesn't seem to be a fruit fly nor do they congregate in kitchen, mostly downstairs.  They also tend to stick low to the ground and found throughout house. From observing this photo they appear to have two light coloured bands along slender body. I don't see the normal protruding fly eyes to side of head so i feel confused to what this is. Weather has been mildly warm at 17C and varying between raining and sunny throughout this month. Thank you.
This fly appears to be in the superfamily Sciaroidea (fungus gnats and gall midges), but I can’t tell much more from this image. Basically harmless nuisance pests when they occur indoors. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4918  Hello. This is a photo of an unidentified bug found in my friends home in Woodstock Ontario. It is summer here so it is fairly hot outside, about 28 .. I'm not a fan of bugs and have goose bumps and chills everywhere .. please tell me what this is !!!!
This is a stag beetle (Coleoptera: Lucanidae); it looks like a male Ceruchus piceus - see
http://tinyurl.com/nmnc7cf for images and more information. They are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4917  I live in Corpus Christi, Texas and I just recently opened up my swimming pool for the summer. These insects are in my swimming pool. I cant find an identification for them. Please help.
This is a larva of an aquatic beetle, maybe in the family Hydrophilidae (water scavenger beetles), see
http://tinyurl.com/mkco9xr for an example. These larvae feed on other small aquatic organisms, and are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4916  We found a bug in our house and would like to know what it is. Hope you can help us. Thank you.  Don and Darlene. Edmonton, Alberta
This is a larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), a cosmopolitan species that can be a pantry pest.  Because their larvae will feed on such a wide variety of organic materials, complete control can be difficult. See
http://tinyurl.com/p7zqooo for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4915  Bat bugs or bed bugs?  For several years, we had a small number of bats (< dozen) overwinter in our condo townhouse attic (an issue with multiple units), we don't think they survived last winter (very cold in Toronto).   Last week when we woke up (7 AM) there was an insect on the top of the bed, under a ceiling fan which is just below the attic. Caught it, put it in alcohol. Though it looks to the naked eye like a bed bug (first we would have had in 25 years living here), a close look with a magnifying glass shows longer hairs on the upper thorax, so perhaps it's actually a bat bug. Reluctant to climb up into the attic to have a look, but we think this might have crawled into the ceiling electrical box for the fan and then fallen down on the bed. My husband used his SLR to get these close-ups. The hairs on the upper thorax seem as long as the width of the eye, implying a bat bug.. We inspected the bed covers, sheets, mattress and box spring VERY carefully, with no signs of any bed bugs at all, we've set some sticky traps under the bed as a precaution.  Any experts out there willing to hazard an educated guess before we call in the exterminator? Thanks, Karen in Toronto.
Looks as if you’ve done your homework well, as this appears more likely to be a bat bug than a bed bug   see http://tinyurl.com/of8te8g and http://tinyurl.com/ygpks6s for comparisons. See http://tinyurl.com/nu7cupj for detailed information on bat bugs, and, if you have not already come across it during your searches, this is about the best overall pub on bed bugs that I have seen: http://tinyurl.com/kv7j744    Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4914  Hello , my name is Andrew and I live in Ontario Canada . One night in the bathroom I found this bug which to me looks like a cockroach , just wanted to know if it was , and what species , thanks !
This is indeed a cockroach, apparently a nymph, but I cannot determine the species. It does not appear to be any of the peridomestic household pest species. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4913  South of Edmonton Alberta. Just had two inches of rain after a long dry spell. this critter was the plant  leaf in a fairly damp .... lots of new larkspur in area but lots of sunshine. Is it harmful? Thank you.  Suzan. 
This is a twice-stabbed stink bug, Cosmopepla lintneriana (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Pentatomidae). Although they will feed on a wide variety of plants (see http://tinyurl.com/2b4lrna), they do not appear to be serious pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4912 This was floating in a dish in my sink today. Quite significant (to me) in size ... Approx 1.5 - 2inches. - looks kind of shrimp-like.  Think we have seen another on the floor the same day and it was fast ( it got away so cannot give more info). Not sure if relevant but we are in the midst of renovations and have torn out our kitchen and flooring.  June 2014 in Ontario Canada. Thanks.  SA
This is a house centipede, Scutigera coleoptrata, a cosmopolitan species often found in buildings where they actively hunt down other arthropods, primarily insects. Reportedly, they can inflict a painful but not dangerous bite if mishandled, See http://tinyurl.com/mn7mzf for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4911 Hi,  This is a spider in our home.  My name is Diane.  We live in Saint-Hubert, Quebec.  Thumb size spider, June, rainy spring, indoors, and late at night. Thank you,  Diane
Like no. 4908, this is an eastern parson spider, Herpyllus ecclesiasticus.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4910  Found in a box in our warehouse. We have products coming in from all over (Asia, Mexico, U.S.) and have no way to identify where this may have originated (could be local).  Thanks.  Colleen. Senior Analyst, EHS (Environmental, Health & Safety)
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), but without knowing your geographic location, I cannot hazard a guess as to its being a local species or not.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4909  Good evening, I'm trying to identify this bug. The photo was taken June 21 and it's indoors. The pests seem to be mostly concentrating in two areas, near the pantry in the kitchen, and near the main entrance to the house. I'm located in Kitchener, Ontario.  Any help you can provide is greatly appreciated. Cheers,  Nik
The overall configuration of this beetle, including its shortened elytra (wing covers) exposing its abdomen appears consistent with it being a pea or bean weevil (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae; subfamily Bruchinae) - see http://tinyurl.com/lgpcra3 for an example. If you have any dry legume seeds or other whole grains stored in your pantry, check for signs of insect damage.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4908 Hello, I found this spider in our bathroom last month. I haven't been able to identify it and just wanted to be sure it wasn't harmful. I've seen a couple of these in the house and garage since then. They haven't bothered us yet so I haven't killed any. They are quite large though (about the size of a quarter, maybe bigger) and have a silvery strip on their backs. We live near Merrickville, Ontario, Canada.  Thanks! Chantel
This is a ground spider (family Gnaphosidae; it looks like a very gravid eastern parson spider, Herpyllus ecclesiasticus - see http://tinyurl.com/qeo7f for an image of a slimmer specimen. They are not dangerous to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4907  Hi there, I found this spider in my yard in Sundre, Alberta.  I'm wondering if it's dangerous for my kids. Ben.
This is a jumping spider (family Salticidae) in the genus Phidippus; likely P. borealis   see http://tinyurl.com/octgz2d for an image. They are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4906  Hello, My name is Annette,  We are located in Sechelt, BC. I have attached a photo of one of the bugs on our decking railing. The bugs are small, only about 2mm long. They move quickly and jump too. They first appeared last summer, disappeared during the winter then came back in April.  There seem to be more and more every day. They seem to come out late afternoon and in the evenings.  We have had the plants on the decking treated last week (Clematis) as they are suckling the life out of my leaves.  But this has not helped.  There are smaller ones too.  We are looking to identify them so that we can get rid of them. Please help! Thanks.
This is a springtail, a primitive arthropod in the order Collembola. The vast majority of springtails, such as your specimen, are harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter. The only species known to be serious pests on vegetation are in the family Sminthuridae which look very much different from your specimen - see
http://tinyurl.com/jwbpdnn for an example. Springtails need abundant moisture/high humidity in order to thrive, so moisture management is the best control. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4905  What are these bugs we found them on our tree in front of our house.  Brett.
These are insects in the order Psocodea (formerly placed in Psocoptera) known as barklice or tree cattle. They are harmless scavengers on bits or organic detritus in bark crevices. See
http://tinyurl.com/n6zqxgf for more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4904  I'm from Odessa , TX . I've found many of these in my house. I've googled and still can't find what the name of this bug is. I'm very worried that it is poisonous.  Amanda
This is an arachnid in the order Solifugae; they go by a variety of common names, including camel spiders, solifugids, solpugids, wind scorpions, and sun spiders. They are not venomous, but have very strong jaws that can deliver a painful bite if mishandled. See
http://tinyurl.com/kpr8njo for more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4903  Hello!  I have been finding these little beetles inside our house in Pelham, ON.  Roughly 5-7 mm long. They appear at night in a well-lit hallway near a cold-air return vent, a dry goods pantry and a linen closet, usually in batches of 4-5.  I'd love to know if they are here for the food, the wood, or something else. Thank you in advance for your help. Great website!  Andrew
This is a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae). The vast majority of the species in this very large family are general predators on other small arthropods and thus usually considered beneficial. However, as in any large family, there are exceptions, and a few species can be pests by feeding on sprouting seeds; see
http://tinyurl.com/pxa9f5z for a couple of examples. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4902  I have ants in my back yard . These ants are coming out of concrete pavement and are not present in the wooden deck or other wood around outside of my home in Calgary. But if look at the pics they look like as carpenter ants but I am bit confused because they are away from wood and also I don't see saw dust. I bought this house two years ago in winter 2011 and in spring 2012 I noticed these ants in my back yard.  We replaced the old deck as wood was rotten mainly due to poor material and improper drainage of water and did not see any ant in the rotten wood. Best regards, Azaz
This is not a carpenter ant (Camponotus sp.), it looks more like a Formica sp. -  see
http://tinyurl.com/mkll9e7 for an example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4901 Hi there, I found this little guy on the back of my neck after hanging some laundry underneath our line tree. We are located in British Columbia Canada in the Okanagan Valley. The insect is approximately 1 cm long (at most) and it is the beginning of June. Would really appreciate your help! I tried to find other pictures but couldn't manage. Thanks.  Wes
This appears to be a larva of a green lacewing (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), both larvae and adult lacewings are voracious predators on small soft-bodied insects such as aphids and caterpillars, and thus usually considered as beneficial. See
http://tinyurl.com/lrzpkr6 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4900  This bug was found crawling on the floor of our house in the spring.  we live in Manitoba . please help us identify this bug. thanks Neil 
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in the genus Trigonarthris; likely Trigonarthris minnesotana - see
http://tinyurl.com/mj5rm7c for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4899 I found this in Cobourg, Ontario. Its sitting on a 1-1/2 pipe it seemed very big.
This is an elm sawfly, Cimbex americana (Hymenoptera: Cimbicidae); their larvae often are mistaken for caterpillars. See
http://tinyurl.com/pwb6242 for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4898  These creatures were on a tropical-looking, outdoor plant in Vancouver, today, June 13/14. It was overcast, warm.  They are about 1/2 - 3/4 inches long.  I have never seen them before, but they look nasty and  have all but sucked the life out of the plant...perhaps they came with the plant ?? Just curious.  Thanks, Roxanna
These insects are protecting, not damaging your plants; they are larvae of a lady beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae); likely Harmonia axyridis, known as the Asian multi-colored lady beetle - see
http://tinyurl.com/lwwqxel for images and more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
                                                   ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

These are ladybird beetle larvae, better known as ladybugs!  If your plants are have 'the life sucked out of them' then these little guys are your best ally.  They feed on aphids.  I agree that they look a bit terrifying but they'll be more familiar within a month.  Robb. Smokey Lake, Alberta. 
4897 Found inside home on basement floor on June 5/2014...only this one, no others. We live in southern Ontario. Can you please tell us what it is? Thank you....Val  
This is a rove beetle (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae), a general predator on other small arthropods. It likely accidentally wandered indoors while searching for prey and starved to death there.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4896  Hi, I only have the one picture. Hopefully it's enough for you to know what it is. I thought it was a pimpla Pidalis but it has many details that are different. Andre.
I’m afraid that you’re in the wrong order; this is a fly in the family Tipulidae and not a wasp. Specifically, it is Ctenophora dorsalis - see
http://tinyurl.com/meqxqyp for an image. Larvae of these flies feed on decaying wood of deciduous trees.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4895  I have found these bugs  1 at a time in every room in my apartment except maybe the kitchen . They are brownish and paper thin, about 1/8 to 1/4 inch in length. I am located in Ottawa, Ontario, month of June, first name is Rick. They have only recently started appearing. I have found them crawling halfway up a living room wall and bedroom wall, along the carpet in the living room and hallway (carpeted). Also on the bathroom sink counter and bedroom floor (carpet). There has been absolutely nothing ever found in my bed or any stains what so ever in my sheets etc. I have not had any bites to my knowledge.  I am hoping they are just carpet Beatles but am afraid they are bed bugs. Strange thing is if they are bed bugs I have found a couple of single ones out during the day when they are supposed to be hiding (if bed bug). Being in an apartment building my apartment and surrounding ones have been sprayed before for Roaches and Bed Bugs.
This bug is in the family Cimicidae, and certainly looks like a bed bug. However, bat bugs are extremely similar and can only be told apart under magnification - see
http://tinyurl.com/kwo2nqj for an illustration. Also, see http://tinyurl.com/kv7j744 for an excellent review article on bed bugs. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4894 We have found these small bugs coming out of the inside of our southeast wall into our window and rear entrance door. They are about an 1/8th of an inch long but seem to be able to crawl through the smallest of cracks. 
This is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), but it does not appear to be any of the species commonly seen indoors and likely are just accidental intruders that will cause no harm. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4893 My wife found these pupas on the bottom of a soup can. We live in eastern North Carolina, US. The can was in our pantry but the pupas could've been there for I don't know how long.
These are pupae of a small fly species; ones found in situations like this often are in the family Phoridae (see
http://tinyurl.com/pf5ryx9 for an example), but I cannot be certain in this case. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4892  Can you help? If not I will just put one in a clear plastic bag and bring it down.  Thanks.  Gareth.
This is a larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), a cosmopolitan species that can be a pantry pest.  Because their larvae will feed on such a wide variety of organic materials, complete control can be difficult. See
http://tinyurl.com/p7zqooo for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4891  Hi, can you tell me if this is a false black widow spider?  Scott. 
This is a comb-footed/cobweb spider (family Theridiidae) in the genus Steatoda, see
http://tinyurl.com/mk8s5wv for an example. Some species in this genus are referred to as ‘false widow’ spiders; they are not dangerous, but can have a very painful bite (personal experience). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4890  This flying beetle landed on out patio door here in Lanark, Ontario, Canada. It has extremely long antenna and carries what appears to be babies on its back.  Dianne
This is a flat-faced long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae; subfamily Lamiinae); perhaps in the genus Monochamus - see
http://tinyurl.com/py6qbgt for an example. The reddish objects are mites, likely in the superfamily Uropodoidea, but I am uncertain as to whether they are merely hitching a ride (phoresy) or are ectoparasites on the beetle. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4889  Cricket of some kind? I live in Iowa all my life and never saw one. Please let me know if its dangerous. Thank you.  Tina
This looks like a camel cricket (Orthoptera: Rhaphidophoridae) in the genus Phrixocnemis - see
http://tinyurl.com/prd9vsd for an example. They are harmless.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4888  Hello! My name is Ginny and I found this little guy on his back with his legs in the air.  I flipped him over and took a picture.  He was on the floor near the front door of my apartment in Studio City California. The front door leads directly outside. We get lots of random crickets or small spiders but I have never seen this little one before. It's June 6, 2014, it's hot outside, usually warm in my apartment (I don't always turn on the air conditioner) It's small about the length of my finger nail. What is this bug and should I be worried in any way? Hoping it's just a beetle of some sort! Thank you for your help! -Ginny 
Number 4888 - This is a beetle in the family Scarabaeidae; it might be in the genus Cyclocephala see
http://tinyurl.com/oveehnn for an example. Larvae of these and related beetles are known as white grubs, and can be serious lawn/turf pests, see http://tinyurl.com/qe9w7j7 for some control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4887  The attached insect was found inside a piece of wooden furniture in a house in Calgary Alberta. It was discovered after several piles of sawdust were found underneath a hole in the wood.  Thanks!
This appears to be one of the wood-boring beetles in the family Bostrichidae, they typically have their head deflected downwards so that it appears hidden from above by its prothorax - see
http://tinyurl.com/o46jdgw for an example (this is not the same species as yours). See http://tinyurl.com/5bz5m for some suggestions on control of wood-boring beetles in general. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4886 Hi. This thumbnail sized beetle was partnered with a friend and the two of them managed to move a dead mouse to an undisclosed location. Obviously quite strong. This was in southeastern BC - Jaffray to be exact. Photo taken on June 1 2014.
This is a burying beetle (Coleoptera: Silphidae) in the genus Nicrophorus. There are at least three species occurring in British Columbia that can have a similar appearance;   -  see http://tinyurl.com/prx8wac for an example. Also known as sexton beetles or carrion beetles, they lay their eggs on fresh carcasses of small mammals or birds after first burying the carcass in loose soil; see http://tinyurl.com/kqnhdaj for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4885  Hello, I live in southwestern Ontario. My husband was out bbq'ing and this is what he has noticed on our deck. It happened it May, 2014. Please help us identified what kind of insect this it. Thank you. Joanna.
This is Alaus oculatus, a click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae) known as the  eyed elater. It is the largest species of click beetle in Ontario. See http://tinyurl.com/qywf8ww for images and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4884  Hi. My neighbour in Kamloops BC found this live specimen while cleaning up in her back yard on June 1st. I'm thinking June bug, but it doesn't really match up with images I've researched so far. Any info you can offer is appreciated. Thanks,  Don Poelzer.
This is a giant water bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Belostomatidae); aka toe biter or electric light bug. They are predators on other aquatic life, primarily other insects, but also sometimes minnows and tadpoles. They have very powerful enzymes in their saliva that serve to break down the tissues of their prey and that also causes the severe pain associated with their bite. Also, they are strong fliers and can be found quite some distance from water. See http://tinyurl.com/qg3ah82 for an image and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4883 I have many of these that seem to be nesting under flat rocks in my flower bed in Saskatoon, SK.  They hover like a wasp, yet look more like a bee.  Can someone tell me what I have here?  Laurie.
This is a solitary bee of some kind, there are species in at least two families that can have an appearance similar to yours, Andrenidae (mining/digging bees) and Megachilidae (leaf-cutting bees). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4882  Hello.  I was wondering if you could help me identify this spider. I found him at my local gym in Orangeville Ont. He is about 4-5 inches long. He had to curl right up inside the large Tim Hortons cup I used to trap him and transport him outside. Maxine
This looks like Dolomedes tenebrosus, known as the dark fishing spider (see http://tinyurl.com/msncvyn for an example). In spite of that name, they often are found at quite some distance from water. These spiders are not aggressive towards humans, but large specimens can give a painful bite if mishandled. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4881 I am from Berea, OH (Suburb of Cleveland).  Found a few of these on my living room floor.  This picture is under high magnification, but it's about 1/2" long or roughly 12mm.  It's probably 0.100" in diameter.  Thanks.  Adam.
This superficially resembles a larviform female of a firefly (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) - see http://tinyurl.com/n9uaorn for an example - but I am by no means certain; it may  not even be an insect. I really would like to see an image of an intact specimen as this one obviously has been dead for some time and has lost all its appendages. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4880  Hello,  Can you identify this bug found in my garden it upstate New York? Thanx.  David
This is a clavate tortoise beetle, Plagiometriona clavata, a leaf beetle (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) in the subfamily Cassidinae. It does not appear to be a serious pest species; see http://tinyurl.com/3o2lqsm for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4879  My name is Samantha. I live in Klamath Falls Oregon found them in my house.  I've found about 10 in my house just recently started taking pictures before killing them.
This is a harmless ground spider (family Gnaphosidae); it looks like a Sergiolus sp. - see http://tinyurl.com/pb8mbw5 for an example. You should just let them go about their business of being volunteer unpaid pest controllers. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4878 Location: North end of Lake Simcoe, east of Orillia, Ontario.  Date: Late May.. i have been seeing TONS of these over the last few days. They are either sitting motionless on the outside wall/window/screen of the house in the morning or jumping/hopping (!?!) on my car during the day (100s of them).  Overall length is about 2", main "body" is about 1/2".  Thank you for your help!  Phil
This is a mayfly (order Ephemeroptera); their immature stages (nymphs/naiads) are aquatic, with most species being herbivores or detritus feeders. They compose an important part of freshwater food webs, and adults some species can emerge in absolutely mind-boggling numbers, but they usually live no more than a day or two. See http://tinyurl.com/n9bfwl3 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4877  The attached flying insect was found in Falkland, BC in a farmers field. A friend also found one on her prperty in Mission, BC (the property covered in cedar, fir and other trees). It appeared to have a stinger but we're not certain. What is it?  Thanks for your help. Patti
This is a giant stonefly (Plecoptera: Pteronarcyidae); their aquatic immature stages (nymphs/naiads) feed on aquatic plants.  See http://tinyurl.com/lvxym9 for images and detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4876  What kind of insect is this? Its a little bigger than an inch.  Jennifer.
This is a stonefly (order Plecoptera); possibly in the family Perlidae. Their immature stages (nymphs/naiads) are aquatic, feeding primarily on other small aquatic invertebrates; the adults do not feed. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4875 Hi, I took this photo this morning.  It was on the bathroom wall  in Vancouver, BC. It was one of the bigger ones that I've seen body and leg wise. That top leg to the bottom leg was a good two inches. The body was about one cm long. The orb was huge. Is it female? Will thousands of babies be crawling about soon? It has a distinctive pattern on the top, almost like a screaming face.  At the back of the building there are trees and shrubs and outside the fence a dumpster bin and lots of garbage cans. Thus there are lots of flies in the summer. Thus there are lots of this kind of spider. If I know what kind it is I can let the landlord know to call a pest company.  It seems this guy is keeping the Silverfish at bay. Is it safe or can it give a nasty or dangerous bite? What species is it? Peter
This is a cellar spider (family Pholcidae); possibly in the genus Psilochorus. They are harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4874  I live in east Texas, and my porches and sides of my house are covered with these little worms. Could you please tell me what they are?
These are millipedes, basically nuisance pests that feed primarily on bits of decomposing organic matter. They require damp conditions/high humidity in order to persist in an environment, so moisture management is the first line in their control.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4873  Hello my name is December. I had found these crawling every where all over my daughters crib last night! She of course slept with us. I had put terro ant killer all around on pieces of aluminum foil and a few hours later I seen them all over eating away! Are these protein ants? I can't find anything that they would be attracted to that area! Seriously her bed! Grosses me out. I am located in Ohio . any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks 
This might be a cornfield ant, but I hesitate to try making a specific i.d. from this image. You might try looking through a publication on household ants of Ohio at http://tinyurl.com/lhq5hp3 to see if that helps. You also might try submitting some specimens to your county office of Ohio’s Cooperative Extension Service (see http://tinyurl.com/3bas59b for contact links) for assistance in identification as well as control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4872  Hi,  Found in Pensacola, Florida USA in May after recent flooding of nearby areas. I found several of these one night climbing on a bathroom wall and in a nearby bedroom. Didn't see any in daylight.  Thanks,  MH
This is a reproductive termite that has shed its wings prior to seeking out a suitable place to start a new colony. You likely should schedule an inspection by a reputable termite control company. See http://tinyurl.com/kubo6nx for a starting point.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4871 My friend found this on her patio. Can you identify it?
This is a moth in the family Notodontidae (prominents); it is extending ‘pencils’ from the end of its abdomen that are giving off chemicals (pheromones) to attract potential mates.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4870  I find these in my home in the Ottawa Valley and cannot figure out if its a tick or not. any help would be comforting either way  Thanks in advance!  Warren. 
This is a broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae), such as a black vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus. These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. Their larvae, however, can be serious root pests - see
http://tinyurl.com/anstvb for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4869  This image was taken by my sister on May 22, 2014 in Port Coquitlam, B.C. Canada. Lots of them around her house but I am unsure exactly which species this is and if it poses any harm to her children.  Thank you.  Shawn.
This is a stonefly (order Plecoptera), but I cannot tell you exactly which species. Their larvae are aquatic, and form an important part of the food web there.  See
http://tinyurl.com/6d2kgmz for more detailed information and http://tinyurl.com/qa3melz for a list of the species known from British Columbia. They all are harmless to humans.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4868  Hello, I'm from Halifax Nova Scotia and we have found these insects in our home beginning in late April (Spring). The first one I found (pictured) was quite large -- about an inch. I have found others in my apartment, though they were not that big. Range is between 1/2  and 3/4 inch. Other notable features are a distinctive dark brown spot at the end of the beetle, and considerably long antenna. Regards, Brandon.
This looks like a wharf borer, Narcerdes melanura (Coleoptera: Oedemeridae). Their larvae develop in very damp/waterlogged/rotten wood, but do not seem to attack sound timbers of any sort. See
http://tinyurl.com/24bdoaz for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.            
4867 From Tyler J.  What is this please.
This is a hacklemesh weaver (family Amaurobiidae); possibly in the genus Callobius - see
http://tinyurl.com/p5ny7z3 for an example. They are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.           
4866  I am trying to find out what kind of flying pest this might be.  It is presently in some spruce shrubs in my friend’s garden.  They seem to be coming out of a crack near a post near the shrubs.  We are from Guelph, Ontario, temperatures have been warm (18 - 22 C) lately.   Thank you for any help you can give us.  Sylvie.
These are not pests, but are valuable pollinators, they are solitary bees, likely in the family Halictidae.      Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4865 We are in Yorkton Sask. I have seen many of these in the house and others seen the same. Do you know what this is? Do I need to worry about them we just moved in to this house less then 2 weeks ago? We also have a 25day old baby girl that spends time on the floor. Thank you.  From a concerned parent and home owner.
This is a terrestrial crustacean in the order Isopoda. Commonly are known as sowbugs, pillbugs, woodlice, roly polys, etc., they are for the most part harmless nuisance pests when they occur indoors. They breathe through gills that must be kept moist, and thus can only persist in damp/humid environments. Moisture/humidity management is the best control strategy. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.            
4864 My name is David and I'm from St Catharines, Ontario. 
This looks like a woodlouse spider, Dysdera crocata, a very widespread species that specializes in feeding on woodlice, terrestrial crustaceans in the order Isopoda (also known as sowbugs, pillbugs, etc.). They have quite large chelicerae (‘fangs’) for their body size, and can deliver a quite painful (but not dangerous) bite if mishandled; see http://tinyurl.com/6qovbz for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4863  Hello, I live in Virginia, US, in a very rural area...this spring, when it got warm, I noticed these tiny bugs crawling on me, it actually bit me, no allergic reaction so far...however, now I'm noticing more and more of them...there seems to be no difference in their activity from night to day...I've pulled my sheets, none of them hiding where I've seen bedbugs hide in photos on the internet...they seem to either fly or jump, as they'll land on me walking thru the room, or sitting on the bed, which they seem to like, one just landed on my laptop as I'm typing...they're dark brown, have a very hard shell, like a beetle, even looks like it houses wings, like larger beetles I've seen...
This is a beetle, it looks like one of the flour beetles in the genus Tribolium; these can be pantry pests as they can infest a wide variety of grain-based dry food products. See
http://tinyurl.com/29qvhmq for images and detailed information including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4862 I live in a suburb just outside of Fort Worth Texas. Yesterday we had a huge rain and when I was coming home I opened my garage and saw close to a hundred of these swarming my fence and garage. I have never seen these near or in my home before. They are very small and squish easily. It almost looks like a red color on the tip of their back and after squished that part becomes almost transparent. Thank you for your time and help.  -Kayla
This appears to be a nymph of either a stink bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) or a burrowing bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Cydnidae), but the image is not clear enough for me to say much more. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4861 This is in Toronto Ontario. It is probably close to 1inch and the photo is taken in my sink. Please help me to identify this as I desperately need a pest control solution. Thank you. Christopher
This appears to be a male oriental cockroach, Blatta orientalis (Blattodea: Blattidae); see
http://tinyurl.com/ydyj3po for images and detailed information including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4860  Hello, I just moved into a new house in Pointe-Claire, Quebec and found this trapped within some packing tape used to wrap up my blinds that I have yet to install. I turned out the light to go to sleep, (bedroom is on the 2nd Story of a tiny cottage) I heard this rustling and scratching and did my best not to panic as it was stuck within the tape… but alive!   It was longer and narrower before it met its demise with a very heavy textbook! Is it a June Bug or Cockroach? TK
This is a beetle in the family Scarabaeidae of the type commonly known as May beetles or June bugs. They are foliage feeders that seldom cause any real harm, but their larvae (white grubs) can be serious lawn/turf pests as they feed on grass roots just below the soils surface. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4859  May 15 southeastern Pennsylvania.... saw this flying around our upstairs bathroom at about 2am.  Approximately 1/2" long by approximately 1/8" wide.  Dark brown.  When I grabbed it with a tissue when it landed I think it made a dull clicking sound!  Very hard shell as well.  I've been trying to figure out what it is.  Weather has been in the low 70s here a little humid not bad though.  Any help is greatly appreciated. Jason
This is a click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae); it is a harmless accidental intruder that simply can be ignored, no cause for any concern. See no. 4850 for another example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4858  Hi there, I found this guy creeping up my driveway in Glace Bay, NS.  I have never seen anything like it before.  Can you please identify what this bug might be? Thanks!  Stephen.
This is a giant water bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Belostomatidae); aka toe biter or electric light bug. They are predators on other aquatic life, primarily other insects, but also sometimes minnows and tadpoles. They have very powerful enzymes in their saliva that serve to break down the tissues of their prey and that also causes the severe pain associated with their bite. Also, they are strong fliers and can be found quite some distance from water. See  for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
http://tinyurl.com/ltuj8n
4857 Hi.  Do you know what this little bug might be?  I was told it might be a tick...  I have seen a few here and there around the house... Thanks.  Cesar
This is a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) in the genus Anthrenus; it looks like a varied carpet beetle, Anthrenus verbasci - see
http://tinyurl.com/4d8frnq for an image and http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for detailed information including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4856 Hi, I live in south eastern Saskatchewan.  We have just seen this fly around in the last 7 or so years in the barn and now we see them in our house. They don't seem to bother food at all, they are mostly by windows.
This is a picture-winged fly (Diptera: Ulidiidae); it looks like Ceroxys latiusculus, a species that appears to be just a nuisance pest that does no real harm - see 
http://tinyurl.com/ne3drf3 for an image and more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4855  Jessica, Found in Carleton Place Ontario, Canada K7C 3P2, on May 18, 2014. Were found when digging in soil while gardening. Weather was sunny with a few clouds. They are about the size of a tic tac mint. They have little fuzzy spikes at their rear, that are rubbed off when touched. Some do not have these spikes and are more shiny. 
This is a nymph of a planthopper in the superfamily Fulgoroidea. The waxy tail filaments are thought to provide some protection against predaceous insects - see http://tinyurl.com/p57zh5l for images and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4854 Lauren,  Northern California.  Found year round and indoors. Usually found in light fixtures and dark spaces.
This is a bristletail (order Zygentoma) in the family Lepismatidae, possibly a silverfish or gray silverfish. These insects, along with their close relatives, firebrats, often are found indoors where they basically are nuisance pests. See http://tinyurl.com/yoj6bl for more detailed information, including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4853  Hi,  This bug was hanging out on the side of a local business building on May 19.  (This is in an area that until fairly recently has been very heavily wooded and is very near  a major river here.) What. IS. this. BUG?!  Thanks so much,  Anne in Birmingham, AL
This appears to be a male eastern dobsonfly, Corydalus cornutus (Megaloptera: Corydalidae). Although it looks fierce, it can apply very little pressure with its long jaws which can deliver only a mild pinch. Female dobsonflies, as well as the aquatic larvae (hellgrammites), have much shorter and stouter jaws that can draw blood if handled carelessly. See http://tinyurl.com/256o98e for much more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4852  Hello, My name is Crista and I live in Mississippi. I found this bug flying around in my bedroom. This month is May. This bug is red with black wings and what look like a feather antenna. Please tell me what this is.
This is a male glowworm beetle (Coleoptera: Phengodidae) in the genus Phengodes. Female beetles in this family remain larviform throughout their life and appear to feed nearly exclusively on large millipedes. See http://tinyurl.com/pavoob5 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4851  My father got stung by this big wasp, I'm wondering if this can be a queen. We're living on the south shore of Montreal, Québec. Thanks for your time and help. Guillaume
This is a bald-faced hornet (Dolichovespula maculata; Hymenoptera: Vespidae), a social wasp with an extremely limited sense of humor when it comes to defending their turf. The one that stung your father undoubtedly was an overwintering female that would have started a new colony this year. See http://tinyurl.com/mg3j4v5 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4850 Please assist in identifying this bug…….Toronto area, photo taken May 2014, condominium residence.
Thanks,  Janet
This is a click beetle (Coleoptera: Elateridae); insects such as these often find there way indoors by accident but do no harm there. The larvae ('wireworms') of some species may be agricultural/garden pests, feeding on underground plant parts (roots, tubers, etc.)  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4849  Hello! I live in a suburb of Dallas and in the past few days I have found lots of these small bugs roaming around on my patio.  They are really small about the size of a brown tick.  They are black but have a red section at the back end of the bug.  In the red section, it looks like it has a small black dot, but it's hard to see. This bug is very flat with just a slight dome shape. At first, I thought they were some kind of ladybug, but they don't have the hard shell of a ladybug or beetle.  I can't tell if they have wings but I haven't noticed any of them flying.  I also thought they could be burrowing bugs, but I read online that those insects have spines on the leg segments, and I don't see that on these insects.    I tried to get the best picture possible, but these bugs are really small, and quite the fast mover.  My 4 year old was picking them up like "baby ladybugs".  I am worried that they might be dangerous (ie. carry infectious diseases etc.)  Please help!
The spines on the legs of burrowing bug (family Cydnidae) nymphs are not all that obvious - see http://tinyurl.com/q3eua96 for an image. There are some stink bug (family Pentatomidae) whose nymphs can have a very similar appearance (see http://tinyurl.com/k9ry3y5 for an example), but these usually do not occur in large aggregations. Burrowing bugs pose no threat to human health (see http://tinyurl.com/o7g9532), nor do the stink bugs.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4848  Hi there, We have been having this insect in our house for a while. Geographical location: Ottawa. 
Location: Basement with carpet.  Size: about 1mm.  Season: Most of the year.  First name: Ramin.
This appears to be a booklouse (Psocodea: Liposcelididae); basically nuisance pests that feed primarily on mould spores and the like in humid environments. Occasionally, they may cause minor damage to starchy materials. See http://tinyurl.com/m6favxe for more detailed information. Notre - most older literature will show these in the order Psocoptera.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4847 Nikita.  Mississauga.  I just found these in my room near the window it spring time with over plus 15 weather.  I'm in an apartment on the 16th floor as well.
This appears to be a very dead beetle, but can't tell much more from this image.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4846  We just moved into a new house and so far I found three of these spiders within a few days. I'm very concerned because we have a new baby and I don't want  them biting him. We live in Timmins, Ontario and the month is May. Spring has just started and we live near a river. They're the size of a quarter.
This male spider looks like a funnel weaver (family Agelenidae); they are not dangerous to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4845  I found this in my lettuce. What should I do with it? Alicia.
This is Murgantia histrionica, a stink bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae) known as a harlequin bug. They can be very serious pests on members of the cabbage family. See
http://tinyurl.com/k5m84hm for detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4844 Hi there. My name is Terri and I'm in Barrie Ontario. Over the last few days we have seen thousands of little dark larvae.  They tend to come out at night at and tend to like the paved driveway.   Please tell me what they are!
These appear to be larvae of crane flies (Diptera: Tipulidae); ones like these often are referred to as 'leather jackets' because of their tough 'skin'. Some of these may be turf pests, feeding on roots of grasses just below the soil surface. Adult crane flies resemble giant mosquitoes (see
http://tinyurl.com/lsjhebm for an example), but they do not bite.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4843  My name is Heidi, and I live in Carrolls Corner, Nova Scotia. I found these two beautiful moths on my back door in June 2009.  I have shown the pictures to many people but no-one has ever seen anything like them. They are about1.5 to 2 inches long/wide, and very vibrant pink, white and yellow. we have never seen anything even close to them in appearance and would love to know what they are. Thank you in advance.
This appears to be a rather faded specimen of a rosy maple moth, Dryocampa rubicunda (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae). See
http://tinyurl.com/kjea95j for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4842  Hello my name is Patrick and every year in late April and May these little bugs fly overhead in clusters and they are quite annoying. I live in Ontario Canada and I was hoping you can help me identify these insects.
This is a non-biting midge (Diptera: Chironomidae). These are close relatives of mosquitoes whose larvae also are aquatic, and adults can emerge in enormous numbers. They can be nuisance pests when this occurs, but fortunately, they are short-lived and do no real harm. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4841  Hi, This bug appeared in my house today.  I’m wondering if you can identify it for me. Thanks,  James
This is yet another example of a  western conifer seedbug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae), a nuisance pest when it occurs indoors, but that does no real damage there. If you scroll down through this site, you will find several other examples of this insect starting at no. 4819. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4840  These bugs are like a bettle I live in Malden ma. I always find them in my bedroom only no other room. And only in the warm weather. Please tell me what kind of bug it is and if it's harmful. And maybe how to get rid of them. They have wings almost like a lady bug but smaller I checked my bed and house I don't have bed bugs what could this be please help.
I cannot be certain from this image, but it might be a black carpet beetle (Attagenus unicolor) or close relative; see
http://tinyurl.com/lnn67cw for an image and http://tinyurl.com/pvgfq3 for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4839  I am in Quebec. These bugs have been flying around my bedroom upstairs over the winter and now continuing into the spring. Every night when watching TV, one or more are flying back and forth in front of it.  Have only seen one downstairs on the main floor. They are small and black, not brown like is pictured. Any ideas? Thank you.  Barbara
Unfortunately, this moth is too badly damaged for me to be confident of identification. About the only moths of this size and general configuration that would be any cause for concern are clothes moths, so you might want to inspect any woolen/silk clothing or fabric items, especially any that have been stored for some time, for signs of insect damage. See
http://tinyurl.com/n2gy9tz for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4838  Found this giant spider crawling on stairs inside the house, what is it? Thanks so much for your help,  Steph
This appears to be a folding trapdoor spider in the genus Antrodiaetus, see http://tinyurl.com/lp7j62z for an image and http://tinyurl.com/oxg3g6y for a short video clip. These spiders are not dangerous to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
 
4837  Hello,  We live in Southern Ontario near Kitchener, but we were hiking near Cambridge Ontario.  We are wondering if this is a tick as we found it on our daughter and she has numerous red spots on her body.  Regards,  Jacquie
This appears to be a male American dog tick, Dermacentor variabilis - see http://tinyurl.com/7fzmega for images and more information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4836  Hello, We have these bugs in our basement.  I’m picking up about 20 of them a day.  They seem to come out when the lights are turned on.  This is the second year we’ve had them in the basement – they appear in the spring.  The bugs are from 7 mm to 12 mm in length.  They are most prevalent in our basement, which is finished with a carpeted floor with underlay over a concrete floor.  A few of the bugs are migrating up the carpeted stairs to the main floor of the house.  There is one floor drain in the laundry room, but they don’t seem to be coming from there.  They don’t seem to be confined to any damp areas (of which there are almost none). It is currently May in Manitoba, but cool and damp outside (the high has been around 8C till now).  I’d very much appreciate help in identifying these bugs.  Thank you,  Brian.  Winnipeg, Manitoba
This is a terrestrial crustacean in the order Isopoda, they commonly are known as sowbugs, pillbugs, woodlice, roly polys, etc. and are for the most part harmless nuisance pests when they occur indoors. Although they may be found nearly everywhere, they breathe through gills that must be kept moist, and thus can only persist in damp/humid environments. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4835  Here is a big spider I found on my basement wall last spring. I live in Port Howe Nova Scotia. Just curious to find out what it is and find out if it's dangerous. 
This is a fishing spider (family Pisauridae) in the genus Dolomedes, most likely Dolomedes tenebrosus, known as the dark fishing spider (see http://tinyurl.com/msncvyn for an example). In spite of that name, they often are found at quite some distance from water. These spiders are not aggressive towards humans, but large specimens can give a painful bite if mishandled. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4834  Hi, I'm Jill. I was wondering what kind of spider this is. I've searched everywhere and can't seem to find one similar to this one. I live in Toronto Ontario. I live in a basement apartment and see these quite frequently all winter and still seeing them now. I was wondering if they are harmful. I've searched through your website and haven't really seen anything I think looks like this. Thank you!
This appears to be Steatoda triangulosa, a comb-footed/cobweb spider (family Theridiidae); see http://tinyurl.com/k4d8bcw for images. Although this is the same family to which the famous widow spiders belong, this species is harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4833  I have seen a number for these guys crawling around moist places (the tub, the kitchen sink, etc.) in the last few days.  I just wanted to know what kind of millipede I'm dealing with (I can't find a good bug identification key online) and/or should it be a source of concern.  They are around 3 cm long and I live in Port Williams, Nova Scotia.  Cheers,  Steve.  IB Geography HL Instructor.
I cannot be certain, but this looks as if it could be in the family Julidae - see
http://tinyurl.com/mywow9a for an example. You might see if you can obtain a copy of "The Millipeds of Eastern Canada (Arthropoda: Diplopoda)", see http://tinyurl.com/m8kjjxa for details. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4832  Hello, My name is Sandra i live in Edmonton and woke up with this guy in my hair. I would like to know what it is and if I should be concerned. Thanks 
This is a larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), a cosmopolitan species that can be a pantry pest.  Because their larvae will feed on such a wide variety of organic materials, complete control can be difficult. See
http://tinyurl.com/p7zqooo for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4831  This insect is about 2”-3” in length, and notice the delicate wings, they look like stained glass.  It was found in the Powell River B.C. area.  When it was airbourne, it wasn’t a graceful flyer, it did get up to about 25 feet in the air.  We found it on about May 1, 2014.  It’s tail end was quite fat, and  it looked like it would be a good meal for a trout.  We would sure like to know what insect it is,  I look forward to hearing anything about it.  Thanks. Larry and Jan
This is a giant stonefly (Plecoptera: Pteronarcyidae) in the genus Pteronarcys. See http://tinyurl.com/lvxym9 for images and detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4830  Hi.  I found this insect in my home in Vernon, BC.  We have seen a few of these in our home now starting mid March.  They are grey in color and have a hard shell.  They have six leg and appear to have short antennae or snout.  Thanks. Arthur
This is a short-snouted/broad-nosed weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). These insects often wander indoors seeking winter shelter, but will do no harm there.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4829  Arizona (Phoenix) Indoors,  April,  Lots of them crawling on baseboards.  Thank you!!! Andy.
Like No. 4826, this  is a nymph of one of the seed bugs in the superfamily Lygaeoidea, but perhaps a different species. Regardless, these simply are nuisance pests when they occur indoors.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4828  This little tiny guy came out from under a wall picture made of wood in Ottawa, ON.
This is a pseudoscorpion, a tiny arachnid related to spiders, scorpions, etc. They are general predators on other small arthropods, and unlike true scorpions, lack venom glands and are completely harmless to humans. See http://tinyurl.com/lubjn5 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4827 Does anyone know what moth this is, and what does it feed on ?  the caterpillar wiggles in fresh water.  Thank you,  Marlin
This is a moth fly (Diptera: Psychodidae). Also known as drain flies, filter flies, or sewer/sewage flies, they are harmless nuisance pests whose larvae usually are found in shallow, highly polluted water or in very damp/wet decomposing organic matter. See http://tinyurl.com/ycj8btm for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4826  Hello, I have a permaculture garden in the front yard. Mostly covered in wood chips and compost. I live in Tempe, Arizona. This evening, I saw thousands of these critters crawling among the rocks, concrete patio and among my sweet alyssum plants.   Not sure what they are. I don’t normally bother with garden pest because I do organic gardening to avoid killing bees and pollinators.  But the shear number of these bugs scared me a little bit. Please help me identify. They are tiny, the largest ones I could find is about 2mm.
This is a nymph of one of the seed bugs in the superfamily Lygaeoidea, perhaps a false chinchbug (Nysius raphanus; family Lygaeidae) - see http://tinyurl.com/n22ppcv  for images and more detailed information. This appears to be a fairly common occurrence in Arizona - see http://tinyurl.com/ksqhmuj for details. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4825  If behavior helps identify... There are many swarming in one place, pairing up, landing, and staying in this, presumably, mating position for long durations. Thanks.  Steve.
These are non-biting midges (Diptera: Chironomidae). Close relatives of mosquitoes, their larvae also are aquatic, and adults can emerge in enormous numbers. They can be nuisance pests when this occurs, but fortunately, they are short-lived and do no real harm. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4824  My name is jean n I live in south Florida. This was found on sticky paper made to catch roaches placed beside refrigerator. Its about 1 inch long. I hope its not a snake. 
This is indeed a tiny, harmless snake, and the image is a good example as to why I am not a fan of sticky traps with the possible exception of cockroach surveillance under carefully monitored conditions. See
http://tinyurl.com/mmssrpa for information on one of the smallest snakes known from Florida.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4823  I live in El Paso, Tx. & most recently (April) have found 3 larvae in my den on a (1)blanket & on my (1) couch all different sizes & (1) on some laundry, i have no carpet, & my house is all ceramic tile. Please help. Claudia.
This is a larva of a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), such as those in the genus Anthrenus.  See
http://tinyurl.com/4d8frnq for an image of an adult beetle and http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for detailed information including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4822  Blenheim Ontario. Spring, inside climbing on the curtain in the sun. Some sort of weevil ?
This is indeed a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae); it appears to be Cleonis piger, known as the large thistle weevil (see http://tinyurl.com/k7pfjmm for an image). This is a European species that reportedly was introduced to North America some time ago to aid I thistle control.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4821  This guy was in my backyard last summer. Very ugly creepy and he had friends. Saw at least 10 of them. Please help me figure out what type of spider this is. Thank you,  Laura
This appears to be a woodlouse spider, Dysdera crocata, a very widespread species that specializes in feeding on woodlice, terrestrial crustaceans in the order Isopoda (also known as sowbugs, pillbugs, etc.). They have quite large chelicerae (‘fangs’) for their body size, and can deliver a quite painful (but not dangerous) bite if mishandled; see http://tinyurl.com/6qovbz for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4820  I found one of these (dead thankfully) in my house a couple days a go in Alberta. I found the second one a moment ago. I've never seen anything like these in Canada. It's spring here in Calgary, Alberta and I have a dog. Is it possible that this is related to the dog? Maybe picked up down by the pond or something? Any help would be great.  Thanks, Jay
These are crustaceans known as amphipods. They are for the most part aquatic, but a few species are able to survive on very wet soils. They feed primarily on decomposing organic matter (a few may be predators on other small invertebrates) and are completely harmless. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4819  I have found several of these bugs in my home over the course of the winter --- and this one recently in April.  I think they might be brought in to the house in my wood that is used to burn in a wood stove. The bug is less than an inch long.  This one was alive (in the window) when I caught it. I live in Kings County, Nova Scotia.   Would appreciate any help in identification, and to know if they are dangerous to the property. Thanks, Bria
If you scroll down through this site, you will find several other examples of this insect starting at no. 4775. It is a western conifer seedbug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae), a nuisance pest when it occurs indoors, but they do no real damage there. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4818 My name is Glory I live in Vernon BC. I sprayed under my kitchen sliding door for ants. Now these worm like creatures come out when the door is in the shade. They do not seem to have legs like a centiped. There are a lot of them. When the sun hits the cement they head back for the house. They seem to come from under the aluminum siding. Thx. 
This is a millipede (class Diplopoda). Most of these are harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter, but ones like these can be nuisance pests when they occur indoors. They require ample moisture/high humidity in order to thrive, so moisture management is key to controlling them. It also helps to keep mulch and other potential harborage away from contact with the house. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4817  I found several of these in the upstairs floor of my house. I was thinking it was some sort of moth, as we have notice some holes in our clothes. But my father-inlaw said maybe termites!! So now I am paranoid. They are close to 1/2" in length, I have found 4 in total, 3 was in and around September of 2013. The 4th one (the one in the pic) was in the beginning of April. I found 2 crawling around the door way to my main bathroom on my second floor. The other 2  in my bedroom, one was on the floor in the ensuite bathroom, the other was crawling out of a screw hole in the drywall.  Cheers.  AD
This is a larva of a beetle in the family Melyridae (soft-winged flower beetles), possibly that of Malachius aeneus  (scarlet malachite beetle) - see http://tinyurl.com/4vfkh6n for an image. These insects appear to be predators on other small arthropods, and would not be responsible for any damage to your clothing. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4816  I walked into my living room tonight after having all of the lights out and there were approximately a dozen of these bugs flying around my living room... Some had wings and some did not. I was trying to identify the insect on Google and was not having any luck. I am hoping you can help. Thank you, Emily
These are termites; you should have your premises scheduled for an inspection by a certified professional termite management/control service. 
Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4815  My name is Joan and I live in Edmonton, Alberta. Every spring we get 3-5 of these 12mm moths in our living room every day. I would like to know more about them so I can figure out where they are coming from and get rid of their food source.  You have a fantastic website.
Unfortunately, I do not recognize this species, but it does not appear to be any of the common pest species that may cause damage indoors. About the only moth of this size that I would be concerned about if I found it indoors would be the Indianmeal moth; see
http://tinyurl.com/m5p47q9 for an image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4814  What kind of spider is this? I saw it on my floor !  Nadine.   Langley, BC
This appears to be a female wolf spider (family Lycosidae); they are active hunters that sometimes wander indoors during their searches for prey. Large specimens can deliver a painful but not dangerous bite if mishandled.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4813  Found this guy in my furnace room, it hides in a gap beside my fresh air intake for furnace.  Don.  Surrey, BC
This is a comb-footed/cobweb spider (family Theridiidae) in the genus Steatoda; likely S. triangulosa, see http://tinyurl.com/k4d8bcw for images. Although this is the same family to which the famous widow spiders belong, this species is harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4812  These cocoons are found on the siding outside my home in rural Saskatchewan.  They are about a centimetre long, some are light  in color while some are dark.  I first noticed them when I moved in to the home in the fall.  It is now April and they have remained stuck to the siding through the long cold winter.  I am new to this area and this climate and I wonder what little critter can survive being exposed to such harsh conditions, AND, is it something that will be a nuisance when they hatch/emerge? Deb. 
This is a chrysalis (pupal stage) of a butterfly, see
http://tinyurl.com/q6emfb4 for an image. Some of these can survive freezing temperatures by producing their own antifreeze. Yours are very unlikely to be pest species.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4811 Location:  Toronto, Ontario - Spring 2014.  Please see attached a photo of a bug found in one of our classrooms.  It was in one of the toys which was picked up by one of our volunteers.  It jumped onto her, bit her as she flicked it off. It left quite a welt on her skin and was stinging.  Please identify if please.  Thank you.  Debra 
This is a nymph of an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae); likely Reduvius personatus, a species known as the masked hunter. This is a peridomestic species often found indoors, and reputed to have an extremely painful bite. See no. 4434 for an example of an adult and
http://tinyurl.com/mwq56m for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4810  I live in Quesnel, B.C., which is in Central B.C. Canada.  Yesterday I was going through some grasslands in the Williams Lake, B.C. area. Today I found this spider (?) crawling on me. I did not get a bite. Please advise as to the species of this spider. I have been going through your website, to no avail. Thank you for your assistance,  Cheryl
This is a hard tick (family Ixodidae) in the genus Dermacentor, possibly a male D. andersoni (Rocky Mountain wood tick) - see http://tinyurl.com/ohuvyxr for an image. This species can vector Rocky Mountain spotted fever as well as cause tick paralysis (see http://tinyurl.com/ppzzh9z). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4809  Hi there, I spotted this spider crawling across my floor. I live in Kingston Ontario near the St. Lawrence river in an older house. The snow is pretty much all melted and is very wet and at times damp. Just concerns me as I have 2 young children and wondering if I should be concerned or worried about this spider.  Thank-you  Kaitlyn
This spider is in the family Agelenidae; possibly the giant house spider, Eratigena atrica - for images  see http://tinyurl.com/lk4g3l7  These spiders are not dangerous to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4808  Hi.  Perhaps you could help me identify this rodent my dog is catching in the backyard. Would really appreciate it.  Chris.
One possibility is a young Norway rat; see http://tinyurl.com/lwbqx4u for a differential diagnosis. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4807  My name is Reinhard and I live in Upper Ohio, 25km inland from Shelburne NS. Our 10 year old house is in the woods and on a lake.  These light brown worms are about 3cm long. They fall out of the wooden ceiling in one of the bathrooms, mostly landing in the bath. If they land on the floor or side of the bath they are able to climb back up to the ceiling.  They first appeared middle of last summer and disappeared late October only to reappear the beginning of March this year.  We see between 2 and 7 every 24 hours.
This appears to be a larva of a beetle in the family Tenebrionidae, such as a mealworm (Tenebrio sp.); see http://tinyurl.com/naku46v for an example. You may wish to examine the area above the bathroom ceiling to see if you can locate the food source for these larvae.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4806  I live in Surrey BC, it's April and the bees are just starting to appear everywhere! I don't mind bees because of what they do for the environment, but I'm terribly afraid of wasps and bees coming close and risking a sting.  I was sitting outside on my balcony the other day and this large, all black bug flew and crashed onto my foot. I was startled at first but when I had a closer look, I realized it was some kind of bee. It just sat there on my foot, even though I shook it gently to make it fly off.  I've seen many types of wasps and bees, but never one that was all black. It was cute and only somewhat fuzzy, very unlike a bumble bee, with thick legs. I don't think it had any intention to harm me at all. It seemed very docile and content sitting there on my slipper. Does anyone know what kind of bee this is? 
 I cannot tell from this image whether or not the abdomen is hairy/fuzzy. If it is, the insect is a bumble bee (Bombus sp.). The only other bee likely to be confused with bumble bees is a large carpenter bee (Xylocopa sp.), but these have a nearly smooth, shiny abdomen - see
http://tinyurl.com/pnvjup3 for an image. Bumble bees may sting when provoked, but carpenter bees appear reluctant to sting under most circumstances.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4805  Found this very little one on my pillow while I was reading before bed.  It's the first real 'warm' day in Toronto since the snow has melt. I had my door and window opened. I moved it off the bed and let it go about its way.  Hope its not a 'pest'.  Also hope to hear from you... I'm a new Mom in a new place and would like to know what's roaming about in here :-) Thanks!
This is a small parasitic wasp, perhaps in the family Bethylidae - see
http://tinyurl.com/pajkpz7 for an example.  Their larvae feed on larvae of beetles and moths, and are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4804  What is this. South Africa. North West. Plus minus 30-35degrees This is inside on the walls. They  move but tend to stay in one spot and pop up everywhere. When taken off the wall with toilet paper they seem soft.  They are smaller than 1 cm. Are they dangerous?  What can I do to get rid off them?  Donne.
This appears to be a household casebearer (Phereoeca sp.; Lepidoptera: Tineidae).  Also known as plaster bagworms, these are close relatives of clothes moths, but appear to be more nuisance pests than destructive ones, as they seem to prefer dining on old spider webs and the like. See
http://tinyurl.com/dn4jn5 for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4803  Hello, my name is George and I'm from Northern Alabama.  I recently saw a dozen or so of these in one of my bathrooms.  It is early April. They are about 1/4-3/8" long. What is this?  Please don't tell me it's a termite.
This is indeed a reproductive caste termite that has shed its wings and is looking for a suitable site to start a new colony. See
http://tinyurl.com/pgzfzlb for a starting point in locating professional termite inspection/control services in your area. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4802  Hi, I find one of these critters every day in the washroom on the wall. Would appreciate any help identifying it. Thanks.  Al.
This is a spider beetle (Coleoptera: Ptinidae; subfamily Ptininae); likely a smooth spider beetle, Gibbium aequinoctiale; see
http://tinyurl.com/ope5t6l for an image. Spider beetles will feed on an extraordinarily wide range of organic materials, and sometimes can become pantry pests. See http://tinyurl.com/mamup5 for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4801 These are dead versions of bugs found in a basement storage room in Newmarket,   I think that the darker one is the adult.  Length - 5-6 mm.  This is smaller than any bugs found described.  No live ones found…. yet.  Thanks,  Andrew

These are both adult white-marked spider beetles (Ptinus fur; Coleoptera: Ptinidae*), the darker one is a female and the other is a male. This is a cosmopolitan species with a very wide distribution; they will feed on an extremely wide variety of organic materials, and sometimes can become pantry pests. 
*This appears to be a fairly recent taxonomic change; most older literature citations consider these beetles to comprise a subfamily of Anobiidae.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4800  Hi, I was cleaning my garage and saw these two spiders. My grand daughter plays there sometimes. The garage is not heated and is not finished. I live in Surrey, BC. It was a rainy day, march 30/14. Looked online but not able to get an I.D.  Sorry I didn't get the ventral part of these spiders to help with identification. Thanks,  Christiane 
These are cobweb/comb-footed spiders (family Theridiidae) in the genus Steatoda. They are not aggressive, but can deliver a very painful (but not dangerous) bite if mishandled. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4799  Any idea what this is? By my sliding glass door... More every time I come back... Move very slow! Surrey BC. Thanks Kim.
This is a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) in the genus Anthrenus; likely a varied carpet beetle, Anthrenus verbasci - see
http://tinyurl.com/4d8frnq for an image and http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for detailed information including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4798 We are restoring a home that was built in the mid-1800's. We have removed all plaster/lathe and old insulation (the old, shredded paper, blown-in type). We re-insulated the home with foam and fiberglass and have installed drywall in some of the rooms on the second story, where we are living. Now that we have "white walls" again with the drywall, we are noticing these little bugs.  We don't notice them on the first floor because the walls are not finished and we are not living on that floor.  I have eliminated pests, such as silver fish, in another home by sprinkling Sevin Dust (for garden pests) around the exterior sill of the house. I'm not sure if that would work in this case as we are primarily living on the second story and I'm not entirely sure how these little guys are getting into the home. 
This is a bristletail (order Zygentoma), a group of primitive insects that includes household nuisance pests such as silverfish and firebrats. See
http://tinyurl.com/mc5vk7j for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4797  My name is Thomas and this little guy has been hanging out in the bathroom for a long time now, my girlfriend  thinks he eats the other spiders.. Like the ones that come down from the ceiling.. I hope that's true cuz I hate spider bites.
This is a male jumping spider (family Salticidae). Most jumping spiders are general opportunistic predators, feeding on just about anything that they can overpower, including other spiders. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV. 
4796 My name is Ellina, I live near Vancouver, BC, Canada. My cat came across this in my dining room tonight. It measured around 1-1.5 inches and could move very fast with bright yellowish markings. Sorry the picture quality isn't great I didn't want to lose track of it before my husband swatted it
This is a stonefly (order Plecoptera): possibly one of the giant stoneflies in the genus Pteronarcys - see http://tinyurl.com/mjkhy94 for an example. Their immature stages (naiads/nymphs) usually are found on the bottoms of fast-moving streams, where they feed on organic detritus. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4795  So I stayed at a hotel Friday night and Sat morn woke up and turned on the light and a few min later found a bug crawling on the top of the  bed comforter. I took a picture of it. This morning I was unpacking my clothes from the hotel and found the same appearing bug (it was dead) in a bag with a damp washcloth.  This is the picture of the one I found crawling on the top of the bed comforter. Is it a beg bug??  Vanessa
This does not look like a bed bug to me, but the image is too blurry for me to hazard much in the way of identification. The shape appears similar to that of a carpet beetle larva, but that’s about it.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4794  I was wondering if you can help me identify this spider. It was taken in Burlington, Ontario. The spider was found indoors walking through my kitchen at 6:00pm. I have two small children and was wondering if it is dangerous? poisonous? Any information would be great. Thank you.  Nicole
This appears to be a male hacklemesh spider (family Amaurobiidae); they are not dangerous to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4793 She was found on a outside wall in Victoria in July 2013.. Fred & Peg.
This appears to be a Common House Spider - Parasteatoda tepidariorum; see
http://tinyurl.com/lvd26ro for an image. This is an exceedingly common, widespread, and harmless species.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4792  Several found inside home near Boston, MA, IN February and March 2014. Karen
This appears to be a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae; see
http://tinyurl.com/ydyulj8 for an example), but the image is too blurry to be confident of a more specific identification. Beetles such as these often gain entry accidentally, such as in/on firewood, but do no damage there. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4791 I'm in Perrys Cove Newfoundland and we found this in the basement of the house that we are building its very cold and really dark and damp in the basement. We have never seen a spider like that before and neither has anyone we shown it to. Any information we could get would be wonderful thanks for your help!  From Donna.
I’m really uncertain about this one myself. If the spider still is available for portraiture, try to obtain an image that clearly shows its eye pattern (on front of head). In the meantime, compare yours with an image of Steatoda triangulosa, a non-dangerous species -http://tinyurl.com/phgjcel. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV
4790  There are 10+ of these cocoons on a neighbor’s lawn and this morning this fella was emerging.  Can you tell me what this is?  Sincerely,  Dana.  Palm Bay, Florida
This appears to be a larva of a beetle in the family Scarabaeidae, but with the exception of green June beetle larvae (which this one is not), they seldom are seen above the ground surface. Larvae of some stag beetles (Coleoptera: Lucanidae) also can be quite similar in appearance (see http://tinyurl.com/n9lcznz for an example), but these usually are found in very moist rotting wood rather than in soil.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4789  I live in Ventura County, Southern California.  I find these little long thin creatures near doors and windows almost all season. Specifically, near the sliding door that goes out to the background from the dining room, on the floor from the bedroom windows next to the backyard. What are they and how can I get rid of them for good? They keep entering the house no matter how clean I keep my home.
This is a small millipede, an arthropod in the class Diplopoda. They basically are scavengers on decomposing organic matter, but a few species, like the garden millipede, can damage very tender plants such as in greenhouse environments. They also can be nuisance pests when they occur indoors. Moisture management is key to their control as they are quite susceptible to drying out. See http://tinyurl.com/2ek5s8 for more control advice.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4788  Hello, My name is Ruth and I am hoping you could help us identify this insect  found in Langley, BC, Canada. There are lots of farm properties and ponds nearby as well. They have just started to become visible about a week ago. They are always found in groups of at least 5-7 and flying around together. They are found resting on the window and when people are outside, they try to attack(?) our faces. They have a very long tail which are lobed like a scorpion, their antennas and end of tail look fluff, with 6 long legs and long antennas. It is about the size of the index fingernail. I am concerned whether or not this insect will bite and if so, how dangerous it is. Please help! Thank you
This appears to be a non-biting midge of some sort, see
http://tinyurl.com/k8ku8sa for an example. There is no need for any control. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4787  This is the third beetle this week I have found in my home. (March 25th, 2014, central Montreal, Quebec,  -1C to -7C outside)  It has a grey body has many tiny brownish spots on the top side and is approximately 1 cm in length and 4mm wide not including the legs and antenna.  Have you any idea what this is?  Is it harmful?  We are having a very late start to spring and temperatures were colder then the last year by an average of 7C. Also we compost and this winter we put the green compost bin in the garage, a separate but attached building to our home that has a concrete dividing wall between the two.   I like bugs and do not want to kill it.  Thank you,  Jane
This is a broad-nosed/short-snouted weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae), possibly a black vine weevil, Otiorhynchus sulcatus. These weevils often enter buildings in search of shelter, but do no harm there. Their larvae, however, can be serious root pests - see
http://tinyurl.com/anstvb for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4786  My name is Lesley. I'm in a new condo (built 2012) and see these often. About one per day.
I live in Toronto, Ontario, in the Distillery district.  They are very small, less than one cm. Black, with a crunchy shell. They do not fly and are very slow moving. Any idea what this is? Thank you. Lesley
This looks like one of the grain/granary weevils (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the genus Sitophilus, see
http://tinyurl.com/laydb6u for an example and http://tinyurl.com/cff3o6r for some control suggestions. Their larvae develop inside seeds such as wheat, rice, or maize (corn), so if you have any of these in storage, you may want to inspect them for signs of infestation. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4785 Hi I live in Ontario and im not sure of what insect this may be. 
I am uncertain as well! It might be a bristletail (silverfish, firebrats, etc.) that has been stripped of nearly all its appendages.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4784  I found a few of these guys in my basement. Calgary, Alberta. All dead no sign of life. Thoughts on what they are?  Michelle
These appear to be ground beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae), general predators on many other small invertebrates. They often wander indoors during their searches for prey. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4783  Location: City of Willoughby in Northeast Ohio, Late winter.  Found indoors, about 3/8 to 1/2 inch long.  First sighted on the floor in front of, and after lighting gas log fireplace for the first time in over two years.  Found one in kitchen cabinet crawling on medicine vial-bottle, (no food in said cabinet) another later on counter top, then, one on dining room ceiling, then, on the floor adjacent to fireplace, (two times) for a total of 6 since early January.   Gene.
This is a brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), an introduced species that rapidly is becoming a pest (especially in orchards) in northeastern/central North America. See
http://tinyurl.com/bpup9yz for more information. They often come indoors to seek shelter from cold weather. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4782  Hi, I live in Hamilton Ohio.  I bought my house 3 months ago and have been finding the fat gray slow moving bugs all over, and usually on the carpet some are bigger and some are smaller.  Please help me identify this bug!  I kill on average 10 a day!  Thank you! 
This is a terrestrial crustacean in the order Isopoda, they commonly are known as sowbugs, pillbugs, woodlice, roly polys, etc. and are for the most part harmless scavengers on decomposing organic matter, but they may become nuisance pests when they occur indoors. As they breathe through gills that must be kept moist, they can only persist in damp/humid environments. Eliminating unnecessary water sources and reducing indoor humidity levels as much as practical will help; chemical control is neither necessary nor recommended.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4781  Hi, My name is Mandy and I live in Gig Harbor, WA. About 6 months ago we noticed these teeny tiny bugs all throughout the house, I've never seen them before in my 33 years of life.  They’ve been on the walls, on the floor, in the sink and for the photos I submitted this little guy is on the power cord of my laptop.  He is a grayish color, slightly slow and no wings.  He is about an 8th of an inch long and about a 16th of an inch wide.  I looked through many of your photos and saw things similar but they weren’t the same. Thanks! 
This is a larva of a soft-winged flower beetle (Coleoptera: Melyridae); it appears to be that of a scarlet malachite beetle, Malachius aeneus - see
http://tinyurl.com/m3t2ohr for an image. Little appears known for certain about their food habits, but they are thought to be primarily predators on other small invertebrates. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4780  Hi,  This insect was crawling around in our livingroom.  Our house is a new build, we've lived here for 3 years and I've never seen this insect before. We live in Keene, Ontario, near Peterborough.  Please let me know what this is...I'm pretty concerned.  Sincerely,  Becky
This is a larva of a soft-winged flower beetle (Coleoptera: Melyridae); it appears to be that of a scarlet malachite beetle, Malachius aeneus - see
http://tinyurl.com/m3t2ohr for an image. Little appears known for certain about their food habits, but they are thought to be primarily predators on other small invertebrates. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4779  Hi ,   Please help us identify these bugs/beetles.  We have found them indoors, Mid March , Vancouver area and indoors. They fly and are easy to catch. If you need more info please feel free to respond.  Thank you, Rob
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). It looks like a cedar tree borer (Semanotus sp.); see
http://tinyurl.com/oxvq3eq for an image. Beetles such as these often are brought indoors accidentally in firewood, but will do no harm there.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4778  Hi.  There are several of these hanging from my ceiling or attached by their top ends to the walls.  They are about 8 mm long and there maybe a white worm inside.  I have bad eyes.  The location is Pattaya Thailand.  It is 35° C and  humid.  Hope you can tell me what will become of these or how the bugs look like.  I find nothing crawling around during the day.  Thank you for your help, this is bugging the hell out of me.  Best regards,  Paul
This might be the now empty ‘case’ (the pale object at the lower end appears to be the remnants of a pupa exuvium from which an adult moth emerged) of a household casebearer, Phereoeca uterella (Lepidoptera: Tineidae). Although related to clothes moths, these caterpillars appear more interested in eating old cobwebs and the like as opposed to clothing items. See http://tinyurl.com/dn4jn5 for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4777 My name is Sally and I live in Minnesota. I found several of these dead bugs under a light in my kitchen.  They are half a cm in size and are black or mottled brown. I think I have found their larva and shed skins in my toiletries cupboard that are smooth, segmented, brown, very skinny with no obvious head and 2cm in length. The larva move slowly and don't seem to have noticeable feet or hairs. I've had a hard time finding an identified example of the larva.
These are carpet beetles (Coleoptera: Dermestidae); the one on the right looks like a black carpet beetle, Attagenus unicolor; see
http://tinyurl.com/lnn67cw for an image and http://tinyurl.com/pvgfq3 for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4776 These are in my kids rooms. We live in nj. Please help. We have sprayed for bed bugs and we are thinking were treating for the wrong thing. Thanks.  Bobbi Jo.
Unfortunately, this is a bed bug. In addition to control information on pestcontrolcanada (
http://tinyurl.com/9vjwn), a very comprehensive publication on bed bugs can be found at http://tinyurl.com/kv7j744   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4775  Please what are these I found one in my bed and on the window sill thank you in advance     Tanisha 
This is a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) in the genus Anthrenus; it appears to be a varied carpet beetle, Anthrenus verbasci - see
http://tinyurl.com/4d8frnq for an image and http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for detailed information including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4774  In one day I found 4 of these approx. 2 cm long bugs in an upstairs bedroom and washroom in my Toronto home.  Any ideas ?  Thanks, Don
Yet another western conifer seedbug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae), a nuisance pest when it occurs indoors. See nos. 4727, 4719, and 4683 for other examples.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4773  I was wondering if I could get some help in identifying this spider..  I found it dead beside my pool. I live in Nelson B.C. in the the west Kootenay region. I have seen A LOT of spiders here and have never seen a spider like this one before, or since. What alarmed me the most was what appears to be rather large fangs on the front of it... any ideas on what it could be?
This looks like a folding-door spider (family Antrodiaetidae) in the genus Antrodiaetus, see
http://tinyurl.com/kf55d2w for an example. In spite of their appearance, they are not dangerous to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4772 Found in Calgary Alberta in my home.  Very small approx 4mm.  Vicky.
This is an orb weaving spider (family Araneidae). It looks like a Larinioides sp.  See
http://tinyurl.com/22kboxt for an example. All orb weavers are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4771  Please find attached a photograph of what I believe is either a fly or a moth. We have several of them in our house and would like to know what it is so we can find out the best way to get rid of them.  Thanks  Callum
This looks like a moth fly (Diptera: Psychodidae). Also known as drain flies, filter flies, or sewer/sewage flies, they are harmless nuisance pests whose larvae usually are found in shallow, highly polluted water or in very damp/wet decomposing organic matter. See
http://tinyurl.com/ycj8btm for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4770  Hi there, My name is Jenn and I found this bug last week (Feb) in my living room stuck on a piece of tape.
I can't seem to find pictures or descriptions online to identify what it is so I'm not sure how to deal with it (if necessary). Thanks for your help.  Winnipeg.
This appears to be a badly damaged silverfish (Zygentoma: Lepismatidae). These and their close relatives, firebrats, are cosmopolitan nuisance pests that seldom cause any serious damage. See
http://tinyurl.com/mc5vk7j for more detailed information, including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4769 Therese critters have turned up all of a sudden, mostly in bedrooms at our house in Covina, Ca. Turns out they also can fly!  Dave
This is a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae) in the genus Anthrenus; perhaps the varied carpet beetle, Anthrenus verbasci - see
http://tinyurl.com/4d8frnq for an image and http://tinyurl.com/yun78p for detailed information including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4768  I took these pics from my home in Toronto during the winter ( March 3 2014) Wondering what it is? Notice the bug was sitting on a cold window frame (-14 C outside)   My girlfriend recently moved out of her place due to some sort of a biting bug infestation. She said it was bed bugs however being familiar with bed bugs, I saw no evidence of that. I'm also wondering if these have anything to do with her itching bites. Note: these were taken in my place and not hers however she does visit here quite often.Thank You   G. 
This is a soft-winged flower beetle (Coleoptera: Melyridae); likely Anthocomus equestris - see http://tinyurl.com/l9hst8c for an image. Many beetles in this family appear to be pollen feeders, but at least some in this genus may be predators on other very small insects.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4767 Crawling in my living room, Kamloops, bc. March 2, 2014. Temp in house 69.  Paused while I took it's photo. my dog has odd lesions on him, that was just random, but you never know what is significant, Thank you.  Connie
This is a ground spider (family Gnaphosidae) in the genus Sergiolus; likely either S. columbianus or S. montanus. These species are very similar in appearance, and can be separated reliably only through microscopic examination of genitalia. They are not dangerous to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4766 I found this crab spider on Common St. John's-Wort on 2 Sept. 2002, near Alouette Lake in Golden Ears Provincial Park, BC.  I have not been able to identify it, so would appreciate any help!  TIA!!  Sharon
This is a crab spider (family Thomisidae), but I cannot tell much more from this image. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4765  This was inside my light fixture. We recently had bed bugs so I am a little over paranoid about any bugs I find. Sorry this is the best photo I could get, the bugs are rather tiny. Anna
These are spider beetles (Coleoptera: Anobiidae; subfamily Ptininae); possibly smooth spider beetles, Gibbium aequinoctiale - see
http://tinyurl.com/lqe7lfc for an image and http://tinyurl.com/mamup5 for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4764  Hi. We live in Victoria, BC. In the past few months, (November to February) we have been invaded in the house by these tiny brown beetles which are about 2mm long. They seem to originate in the bathroom, then wander off to other areas. They crawl slowly, and fly when necessary.  Usually get about 6 per day. They also seem to like window ledges.  Any advice on control/elimination appreciated! Thanks,  Alan
This looks like a drugstore beetle, Stegobium paniceum (Coleoptera: Anobiidae). See
http://tinyurl.com/dba9uj for more detailed information on this pest, along with its look-alike relative, the cigarette beetle.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4763  Please help us identify this bug. It is February 25, 2014 and we see a couple each week. They fly indoors. We live in Langley, British Columbia.  Thanks.  Elvin
Unfortunately, this moth is too badly damaged for me to attempt a specific identification. If you see another, please try to get a picture showing a dorsal (top side) view. In the meantime, look at an image of an Indianmeal moth at
http://tinyurl.com/lp4mhel to see if this is what you might have. If it is, see http://tinyurl.com/n8ceroo for control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4762  Do you know what this is or where it comes from???  Kelsey
This is a male arctiid moth (Lepidoptera: Erebidae; subfamily Arctiinae) with its coremata on display. The coremata is an eversible gland the male moth uses to disperse its sex pheromone to attract female moths. See
http://tinyurl.com/m3xydlg for more information on this subject; these moths are common virtually worldwide. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4761  Found these in My couch in the cracks. Several of them. Help???? I'm panicking. I'm I. Austin, Texas. 
This is one of the grain beetles in the genus Oryzaephilus, either a saw-toothed (O. surinamensis) or merchant (O. mercator) grain beetle. They feed primarily on damaged grains or grain-derived dry stored food products, and can become pantry pests. See
http://tinyurl.com/m99jkh4 for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4760  I live in southeastern Pennsylvania. I have found 2 of these worm looking things while digging in my yard. They are dark brown/black in color about 2 to 2.5 inches long and are about an inch fat at on end and slightly more narrow at the other. The outside of it is hard, not soft. I am completely puzzled as to what it is. Anyone know?
This is a pupa of a moth, possibly in the family Sphingidae (hawk/hummingbird moths, etc.); see
http://tinyurl.com/n6mxcdx for an example. The mature larvae of many species in this family burrow into loose soil before undergoing pupation.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4759  Hello,  We have these little bugs flying in our house and cannot locate the source!!  They have been in the house for about 2 months (Jan and Feb)  They tend to congregate on the windows.  We live in Calgary and have had a cold winter.  They don't bite and they don't seem to be coming from fruit (which don't have out of fridge on counter anymore)  Also we have 3 house plants which we have sprayed and when we shake them no bugs come from them,  we have looked for food sources etc but can't find any. Hopefully you can help us identify what they are and a possible source and remedy!!  Thank you for your help,   Mary-Lou.
These appear to be fungus gnats (Diptera: Sciaridae); they basically are nuisance pests, but their larvae (maggots) sometimes can damage very tender plant roots/lower stems, especially in greenhouses or indoor potted plants. They are most prevalent in saturated soils having a high organic matter content; the best preventive measure is to avoid overwatering indoor plants, allowing the soil to dry out as much as practical between waterings.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4758  Hi my name is Nathalie I live in Hamilton in. O.N. For 13 years now.  The last 10 months I had problems with pharaoh ants German cockroach.  Now I found 3 of those bug in my washroom one in my basement not sure what it is. Very small bug.   
This appears to be a bed bug, Cimex lectularius (Hemiptera/Heteroptera; Cimicidae). You can find detailed information on how to deal with them on this pestcontrolcanada page (
http://tinyurl.com/bwdnb8) that also has links to pest control professionals in your area.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4757 We have seen found these in our house the past 3 or 4 weeks. It is Mid way through February and we are located on Prince Edward Island, East Coast of Canada.
This appears to be a male wasp in the family Ichneumonidae, see
http://tinyurl.com/maebp7j for an example. They all are parasitic on insects and other arthropods, and completely harmless to humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4756  What are these worms that are dangling from our vaulted ceiling in our new house in the finished and unfinished areas. How do I get rid of them? Thank you SO much!  Amy k
As with the previous specimen, I cannot see enough detail to be confident of identification. I will guess that it might be a very small moth caterpillar; female moths that get indoors  have been known to lay their egg masses on walls or ceilings and when the eggs hatch, the larvae wander about until they eventually starve, but in the meantime, often cause much concern to the home’s human occupants. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4755 I find this all over under my bed. Erica.
I cannot see enough detail to say much beyond that it appears to be the cast skin of an insect larva of some kind; the worst case scenario being that it might be that of a dermestid (carpet) beetle, but it sure doesn’t look like a typical one if it is. It also would be helpful if you specified both its size and your geographic area should you be able to post other images. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4754  The attached (yellow jacket/wasp/bee?) was photographed in late January 2014 at Daytona Beach, Florida. Identification will be appreciated.  Howard
This is a vespid wasp in the genus Polistes; likely P. major - see
http://tinyurl.com/m8c2aj3 for an image and http://tinyurl.com/md8suzl for a little more information on this species. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4753 Found this in my room trying to identify.
 
This specimen is so badly damaged that I hesitate to say much  my best guess is that it could be a young silverfish (Zygentoma: Lepismatidae) that has lost most of its appendages as well as its body covering (scales). Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4752  This was found in the basement at the bottom of the stairs. We are in West-central Alberta and it is mid-February. Thanks for your help
This is a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae), but it does not appear to be an old house borer (Hylotrupes bajulus), the only species that would actually infest any part of a house.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4751  We saw this bug this morning.  It was in the hall upstairs in our house.   We are in Toronto.  My name is Catherine.   Is it a small cockroach?  We are very concerned...
This does appear to be a cockroach nymph. If you see many more, you may want to contact a pest control company in your area. You can easily find links to some here: http://pestcontrolcanada.com/toronto pest control.htm  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4750  Hi, I really need your help.  I have a problem with this type of insect in the house. I catch approximately 25 each day and they are only on one level. Last year I had a problem with carpenter ant’s but assumed the exterminator got rid of them. I don’t know if this has anything to do with the ants. I live in Saint John, NB, Canada and the temperature has been -15 to -20 all month.  These dead insects are Approximately 3/4 of an inch.  Thank you and any help would be appreciated, Andrew
This is a reproductive (winged) ant and it does appear to be a carpenter ant. If you heat with wood, they might be coming in on firewood. This commonly occurs at our house, especially with locust wood. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4749 This spider was approximately 3” long from front legs to rear. Found in rocks under a fire pit in Oxford Ga. in late December of 2013. I believe it is a very large Forest Wolf Spider.  Barry
This is a fishing spider (family Pisauridae) in the genus Dolomedes, possibly Dolomedes tenebrosus  (see http://tinyurl.com/msncvyn for an example). However, some individuals of D. scriptus can be very similar in appearance. These spiders are not aggressive towards humans, but can give a painful bite if mishandled.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4748  What kind of bug is this...I live in Ohio and found it on my living room floor.
This is the remains of a dead beetle, possibly a ground beetle (Coleoptera: Carabidae); nothing to worry about.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4747  My name is Violeta Centeno and I've recently found these small worms in different areas of my home. Each worm has a different color and size.  Some that are yellowish, and some that are very light and can barely be seen. Some are very tiny and some are like 1/2 an inch. I found them under my couches, under the beds, in the closets, on my hard wood floors, and in the tubs where my children's toys are. I also found some white worms in my kitchen cabinets but I assume those are different kind of worms since the color and size weren't the same as the other ones. I also found small black beetles in different areas of my house.  Please help me and give me some advice on how I should treat this issue and how I could've brought these creatures into my house?  I live in Rockford Illinois in the US. It's winter here and the worms/beetles were found inside my home.
This is a shed ‘skin’ (exoskeleton) of a beetle in the family Dermestidae (carpet/hide/skin beetles and allies); likely in the genus Attagenus. See
http://tinyurl.com/pvgfq3 for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4746  Hi, I found this "larvae" yesterday in my guinea pig's cage. First I was thinking it was one of her feces but it started to move and I got really concerned. I don't know if it came from the organic mix green that I fed them that I just bought at the supermarket.  This salad suppose to be clean and ready to eat. As you can see I was really scared that it could be "worm feces" but then I was able to see that it looks like a "black pupa". I feed them with alfalfa pellets but I did not find anything like that inside the bag. I clean their cage every 2 days and its the first time that I've see something like that. I live in Memphis TN, USA and its 25 to 30 degrees outside. My guinea pigs never go outside and I keep their cage really clean. Can you identify what kind of insect its this and where it comes from? Thank you   Alder
This appears to be a pupa of some kind of moth, but I would hesitate to even guess as to its identity before the moth emerges. Whatever it is, it is nothing that would pose any threat to your guinea pig. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4745 My name is Patrick & 2 of these bugs were found in my new York residence 1 in the bathroom and the other in a bed room. It is currently very cold outside.
This is a cockroach, it might be a nymph of one in the genus Periplaneta.  See http://tinyurl.com/mtyvmfk for some control suggestions. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4744  This insect was found in our bedroom today in Cobourg Ontario It is 3/4" long. Could you please identify it ? Thank you.  Bill
Yet another (albeit somewhat mangled) example of a western conifer seedbug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae); see nos. 4727 and 4719 for other examples. These insects often come indoors in search of winter shelter, but do no harm there. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4743 I keep finding these in my workplace and haven't seen them anywhere else, so im really not sure what it is, im guessing maybe some kind of larva though, they are pretty quick too.  Alex.
This looks like a silverfish, a bristletail (order Zygentoma) in the family Lepismatidae. Silverfish and their close cousins known as firebrats can be nuisance pests in homes; see
http://tinyurl.com/mc5vk7j for more detailed information, including control recommendations.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4742 About 1/2 to 3/4 of an inch. Yellow and black/brown stripes. One clear set of wings and one set of colored wings  (think they are wings). Looks like it has a stinger. Found indoors each winter in Maine. Help please Doug.
This appears to be a long-horned wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae); ones like this often are brought indoors accidentally in firewood, but will do no damage there. The only species likely to infest buildings is the old house borer, Hylotrupes bajulus - see
http://tinyurl.com/ykmzv78   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4741  Hello, I found this insect on the wall near the ceiling. It was in my kitchen, on a day that it was constantly snowing and fairly mild for Canadian winters. It was over 2 cm in body length and was fairly tall. It must have had a hard shell because it made a crunch sound when I killed it. I live in Southwestern Ontario and I am hoping to determine if this bug will not require me to hire a pest control company. Thanks in advance for any help! Lindsey
This is a cockroach nymph, but I cannot be certain of its specific identification. If you believe that your infestation requires the services of a professional pest controller, you can find information on Ontario companies at this link on pestcontrolcanada.com:
http://tinyurl.com/3bpl9hy  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4740  I live in Houston tx, the temp. has been around high 50.. I have been finding these all over my house from bedroom to kitchen.. The picture indicates how tiny they are. They are very small.. They play dead too.. They look like sesame seeds when playing dead. Please help me identify.. Thanks for your help. From Deanna 
This looks like a cigarette beetle, Lasioderma serricorne (Coleoptera: Anobiidae). See
http://tinyurl.com/dba9uj for more detailed information on this pest, along with its look-alike relative, the drugstore beetle. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4739  Live in Oakville, Ontario, Canada. Found a few of these in my daughter's room this evening. Darryl
This looks like a redheaded ash borer (Neoclytus acuminatus; Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). They often are brought indoors accidentally in firewood, but will do no damage there. See
http://tinyurl.com/k8j27rp for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4738  Hello, I recently found this insect in my mridangam (a south Indian hand drum) bag.  It appears to have been eating the goatskin head.  The shell of the drum is made of jack wood.  Thank you!  David
This is a larva and shed larval ‘skin’ of a carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), likely in the genus Attagenus (black carpet beetle and allies). See
http://tinyurl.com/pvgfq3 for a fact sheet that includes control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

4737 I've been following your website for many years now and in fact it is one of two "home pages" which appear when I start my browser.  I've always been curious about Mr. Saugstad's occasional comments regarding "painful but not dangerous bites" from certain insects, bugs etc.  I'd like to understand what exactly causes this pain.  Is it just the mechanical trauma suffered by the skin or is there injection/application of some chemical which causes the pain?  Jack.  Alabama.
The causes of pain from an arthropod bite can include both mechanical (such as from very powerful jaws/fangs that penetrate/lacerate skin and underlying tissues) and chemical factors. Many predatory insects having piercing/sucking mouthparts (such as assassin bugs, giant water bugs, etc.) have strong enzymes in their saliva that break down the tissues of their prey, and these can cause severe pain when injected during a bite. Also, some arthropod venoms contain chemicals that act directly on pain receptors in the skin. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

4736  Found this in my office on my desk in Webster City, IA on January 30, 2014 at 9 am CST about 30 degrees and snowing, but has been extremely cold here for weeks, like below zero. Thank you,  Lindsey
This is a pseudoscorpion, a tiny arachnid related to spiders, scorpions, etc. They are general predators on other small arthropods, and unlike true scorpions, lack venom glands and are completely harmless to humans. See http://tinyurl.com/lubjn5 for more detailed information on these fascinating creatures. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4735  Present year round in food pantry, chocolate, vegetable oil, cake mixes, etc.  Picture taken in January 2014.   Chuck from Yorktown, VA
These beetles are either cigarette or drugstore beetles (Coleoptera: Anobiidae), pantry pests that will feed on an extraordinarily wide variety of organic materials. See http://tinyurl.com/dba9uj for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4734 I live in Toronto and we found a few of these little guys in our pantry.  I assumed it was some type of weevil but haven't been able to find anything that looks like it.  Graham
The image is not clear enough for me to be certain, but this could be one of the beetles in the family Anobiidae that can be pantry pests such as cigarette or drugstore beetles. See
http://tinyurl.com/dba9uj for more detailed information, including control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4733  Found 2 of these spiders  under my stairs in my bedroom. The first one they found was upside down on its web.  Didn't seem disturbed or anything while I took her picture.  The web is very abstract, messy I suppose you could say.  The web is about 6 inches above the floor.  I noticed a while ball of web, with webbing attached stretching over more of the wall base.   There is a pile of big black  dead beetles.  Beside this pile, is another pile of small bugs.  I assume these spiders have been there for a while helping with bug control.  They aren't too big either.  The size of a mans thumb nail with its legs.  Also in the web was 3 spiders, smaller bodies with longer legs.  I'm assuming it's a false widow? Thank you for your time, Alicia, Located on the outskirts of Prince George BC. Photo taken January 27th.  Cold and snowy outside.  We rely on wood heat and space heaters, so the temperature in the house varies. 
This is a comb-footed/cobweb spider (family Theridiidae) in the genus Steatoda (see
http://tinyurl.com/mheuwgh for an example), but I cannot be more specific from this ventral view. Some species in this genus can deliver a quite painful bite if mishandled, but they are neither dangerous nor aggressive towards humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4732 there are many of these outside of our home, along the garage, on our deck, multiplying fast. I found this particular one very interesting because I have never seen one so Big before!!! He was intriguing to watch too as he built his web to catch its prey. I appreciate you offering to look and examine this image I have captured of him and anxiously await to hear its identity       Prince Albert, Saskatchewan Canada.   Susan
This is a female orb weaving spider in the genus Araneus; see
http://tinyurl.com/mmr2nko for an example. All orb weavers are harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4731  I found two of these bugs in my home over the weekend. I live in Winnipeg, Mb. Can you tell me what it is?  Thanks, Sandra.
This appears to be a nymph of Reduvius personatus, an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as the masked hunter. They are reported to have an extremely painful bite, and should be treated with caution. See no. 4434 for an example of an adult and
http://tinyurl.com/mwq56m for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4730  Hi, I live in a Condo, and for the past month I have been finding this moth like pest flying around my place. At first I thought it was one incident, however I have now ran into 10 and I have a bad feeling that I am dealing with an infestation. Before I alert the property management, I would like to get some information on this pest, to see whether is specific to my Unit or a Building issue. Location: Mississauga, Ontario.  Indoors Condominium. Weather: currently cold winter and indoors 68 to 72 deg Fahrenheit.  Regards, Arash
I cannot be certain from this image, but it looks like a member of the family Pyralidae. This family includes several pest species, but your specimen does not resemble any of those commonly found indoors. Just to be safe, check any dry food products (including dry pet food and bird seed) for signs of insect infestation, and if you can obtain a clearly focused image of one of these taken from directly overhead (dorsal view), please resubmit. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4729  Hi, i found four of these in the past week in the areas where our dog hangs out. They have a hard grayish shell and are about 7-10mm long.  Our apartment is in Puerto Rico. Could you please help identify those? Thanks, Sona
This is an engorged female hard tick (family Ixodidae); likely a brown dog tick, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, which has a nearly world-wide distribution. See
http://tinyurl.com/cu8akgf for an image and http://tinyurl.com/lproer2 for some control recommendations. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4728  Found this in my backyard in Burlington Ontario.  I've killed 2 that were in my house.  I found it in a pile of leaves and sticks along the side of my house.  Pls ID for me.  Thnx.  Tim
This appears to be a woodlouse spider, Dysdera crocata, a very widespread species that may be overlooked because it usually is found under cover of some kind. As the name implies, it specializes in feeding on woodlice, terrestrial crustaceans in the order Isopoda (also known as sowbugs, pillbugs, etc.). They have quite large chelicerae (‘fangs’) for their body size, and can deliver a quite painful (but not dangerous) bite if mishandled; see
http://tinyurl.com/6qovbz for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4727 Found this one on the kitchen table tonight…big as a quarter…any ideas?  Annette.  Langley, BC
This insect, a western conifer seedbug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae), is a likely candidate for the species most frequently submitted to this site - see nos. 4719 and 4683 for other examples. These insects often come indoors in search of winter shelter, but do no harm there. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4726  Hello, this spider was found in our house on a ceiling.  I is about the size of a quarter , it's winter here now usually -10 to -20 C, here in Calgary, Alberta Canada, but we are experiencing a Chinook this week so it's warmer this week +12 C today.  I used to reside in White Rock, British Columbia but had never seen  a spider like this in BC either.  Could you please identify for me.    Thank  You,  Dale.
This is Phidippus audax, a jumping spider (family Salticidae) commonly known as the bold or daring jumper. It is a quite common species widely distributed in North America, see
http://tinyurl.com/ohvwj5g for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4725 This photo was taken at Saskatchewan Landing Provincial Park on June 21, 2013. Thanks for helping us identify this insect.. Cathy
This is a weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) in the genus Merhynchites (rose curculios); see http://tinyurl.com/momujrs for an example and http://tinyurl.com/m2dglld for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4724  Hello,  I found this parasitoid inside the abdomen of a click beetle (Agriotes obscurus L.), attached to the dorsal surface.  The beetle was collected in the spring, in the Chilliwack (BC) area, where this is the predominant click beetle species.  Any idea what I am looking at?  Much appreciate your help!  Wim
This looks very much like a pupa of a fly in the family Phoridae (hump-backed or scuttle flies); see
http://tinyurl.com/ks4vkne for an example. Larvae of these flies usually are scavengers on decomposing organic matter, but a few species are known to be parasitic on other insects.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4723  I keep finding these bugs in my room only, note my room is the coldest in the house, I live on the second floor and during last summer I found 3 dead, but so far this is 5 I've seen this year. Can you please help me and let me know if they are dangerous or what to do?  Cynthia
This is a brown marmorated stink bug, Halyomorpha halys (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Pentatomidae), an introduced species that rapidly is becoming a pest in northeastern/central North America. See
http://tinyurl.com/bpup9yz for more information. They often come indoors to seek shelter from cold weather. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4722  My name is Patti and the images were taken January 17, 2014 in North Vancouver, BC. We have been away for 5 months and the home has been looked after on a daily basis but clothes and pantry items were wrapped and stored during our absence. On our return we have noticed several moths which appear to be clothes and or pantry type moths in all areas of the house. However, in swatting and killing several around the house we found this one which does not appear to be the same. Can you please tell us what type of insect this is? While it may not be pertinent, we have returned from Bali, Indonesia and brought back several textile and wood sculpture articles and hope we have not inadvertently imported a non-indigenous species of pests. Thank you in advance for your help.
I cannot be completely certain because of the angle from which this image was taken, but it looks like a dung fly (Diptera: Scathophagidae). These are predators, primarily on other dung-associated insects; see
http://tinyurl.com/lqfrrh7 for images and more information. These are native, and will not harm anything in your house. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4721  Hello.  We just notice a couple days ago this little flying bug (about 2 mm long) around the windows sill. They have little wings but while touching them they barely move. I have seen about 10 the first day but 3 days later a can see about 50 of them around the windows inside the house. I have saw some on the ceiling over the light. I was wondering if they could be cause by a water flood from my upstairs bathroom just over the front door where they have been found. The water when through the ceiling and we didn't open the ceiling yet. I have remove my ceiling light cover but didn't find any inside.  We are from Quebec Gatineau and the weather as been a bit warmer since the weekend. it's about 5 degree Celsius. Any help identifying this little bug would be appreciated.  Regards  Simon
This is a tiny parasitic wasp, possibly in the superfamily Cynipoidea; it will not harm you or anything in your house.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4720 Hi this beetle was found in Pietermaritzburg South Africa, They were found sucking sap from and Aloe plant, they also have a strong Almond smell. Anyone have an idea what it is?
These look like bugs in the family Scutelleridae (jewel bugs/shield-backed bugs), but I can’t take them any further. No members of this family appear to be reported as serious pests on aloe in South Africa.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4719  Hello,  I live in Stouffville, Ontario. We have been finding what looks like
long-horned beetles in our home. The strange thing is that it's during the
winter and we are worried that they are nesting somewhere inside the walls. Could they damage our home? Lori
This is a western conifer seedbug, Leptoglossus occidentalis (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae), a species very frequent submitted to this site - see no. 4683 for another example. These insects often come indoors in search of winter shelter, but do no harm there. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4718 From Ken, Vancouver, B.C. Taken Jan. 12, 2014, spider found inside a damp garage during very wet weather. Abdomen is about 8 mm in length, brown, somewhat shiny and with two lighter triangular markings on top.  Total length including legs is about 30 mm.  Thanks.
This is a comb-footed/cobweb spider (family Theridiidae) in the genus Steatoda, possibly Steatoda bipunctata or S. grossa; see
http://tinyurl.com/mheuwgh for an example. They can deliver a painful but not dangerous bite if mishandled; they are not aggressive towards humans.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4717  Can someone please ID this apparent small beetle? Approx 3mm in length, Location Toronto, Ontario, winter months found periodically in bathroom area but seeing more of them, always in the same area. Often found upside down trying to turn upright - slow moving, dark looking. Much appreciated, Tom
Not a beetle at all, but a very large aphid (Hemiptera/Sternorrhyncha: Aphididae). Commonly known as plant lice, they all are sap feeders, and some species can be serious pests. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

4716  We are located in southwest Missouri and this is the first time I have seen this pest. The insect looks a lot like a Sawyer beetle, is gray in color, can fly, and it is just a little over 1/2 inch long.    They are very aggressive eaters and during the heat of the day, they will drop to lower branches to feed.  The weather this year has been very hot and dry.  I'm not sure if the weather has brought them in from a dryer location. 
These are blister beetles (Coleoptera: Meloidae); likely in the genus Epicauta - see
http://tinyurl.com/k2pyenv for an example. These are voracious feeders that can quickly cause considerable damage to plants, and the fluid (hemolymph) they exude from their joints when disturbed can cause blistering to tender skin. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

4715 Found in my cold cellar (and it is cold in there!) in Kitchener, Ontario. About looney size. Thanks!!
This appears to be a funnel weaving spider (family Agelenidae), such as the barn funnel weaver, Tegenaria domestica ; see
http://tinyurl.com/kjpntyv for images and more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4714  Hello my name is Rosie. I live in an apartment complex in Fresno, CA. The apartment complex is about 20 years old and I have lived here for about three years. I've never seen this bug before but the entire complex has been recently remodeled inside and out (7months to be exact). I keep finding more and more of these lil buggers especially around my kitchen cabinets and cooking oil containers. Please help me identify them so that I can take the necessary precautions. They started appearing more around fall and have multiplied since. Plz help!!
It is possible that this small beetle could be one of those in the family Anobiidae that can be pantry pests. Check any dry stored food products in your pantry (including spices and dry pet food) for signs of infestation, and dispose of any found to be infested. Then, give the food storage areas a thorough cleaning, and keep infestable products in sealable plastic, glass, or metal containers. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4713  Hi I seen this spider in a parking lot in St. Catharines Ontario and it's like nothing i've seen before. I showed a few people and they thought it was a crab. It does sort of look like one. What type of spider would this be?  Anna.
This is a female orb weaving spider in the genus Araneus, she is near the end of her life, and given her condition, difficult to be certain precisely which species she might be. Araneus diadematus is one possibility; see
http://tinyurl.com/lth3xwe for an example. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4712  These tiny seed like piles appear daily for the last week or so. Cant seem to find anything on them being that I cant tell if they are Seeds, eggs, larvae, carcasses...No apparent legs or heads. They are tiny, maybe .5 mm long by .25 mm wide. A small pile appears over a two day period. size of pile approximately 1.5 inches around and 1/4 inches high.  The attached pictures were taken the morning after cleaning up such a pile. Location San Jose Ca.  - Late December - Early January
I’m afraid that you have an infestation of drywood termites, as these are their fecal pellets (‘frass’) that they expel through holes in the wood they are feeding upon - see
http://tinyurl.com/yhkf3j2 for detailed information and http://tinyurl.com/mo7nzqs for a starting point for locating termite control specialists in your area. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4711  My name is brad. Attached is a photo of an insect (magnified) that i found in a closet. I also found a few more with the same characteristics.  - geographical area: Greater Toronto Area.  - season: winter.  - size: tip of pin / less that half the size of a grain of rice –very tiny.  - color: beige and brown.  - 6 legs / 2 antennas / 2 wings- they were found alive but could not fly. Which makes me believe they are in the early stages of development. They would move slowly and jump i put my finger near. They are currently in a bag and can jump from side to side.  - we are also noticing small bites on our body.  Any assistance would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
This is a booklouse (Psocodea: Liposcelidae). They basically are nuisance pests that cause little if any real harm, as they feed primarily on mould spores and bits of organic detritus; they are incapable of biting humans.. They are subject to desiccation, so eliminating unnecessary sources of moisture and lowering indoor humidity levels as much as practical will help control them. See
http://tinyurl.com/mvz4xf for a fact sheet with more detailed information  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4710 I found this thing in my basement just now, tried to look it up & found nothing. it was very quick & maneuvered extremely fast. I had to torch it in order to stop it from consuming my soul. this picture is of the top front of the spider, its legs are pointed upward because of the quick blast of fire, i guess. please reply to this email if you are able to identify the spider!
This is a ground spider (family Gnaphosidae) in the genus Herpyllus; see
http://tinyurl.com/lr8wd8 for an example. Known as a parson spider, it is completely harmless to humans. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4709 This is a tiny bug about the size of a fruit fly flies around my window in my home in Toronto,  ON.  I often find dead ones in water that has been sitting around. I see them in the summer and now the winter too. Thanks, Jennifer
This appears to be a dark-winged fungus gnat (Diptera: Sciaridae), see
http://tinyurl.com/llc5zu for an image. These basically are nuisance pests when they occur indoors, but their larvae (maggots) can damage roots and lower stems of very tender plants; see http://tinyurl.com/mmsfugf for more detailed information.. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4708  Found deer lake ,Newfoundland in glass jar, bottom cupboard. Ugh!! Jan month cleaning out cupboards, it was dead in the empty glass jar. Christine. 
This is a larder beetle, Dermestes lardarius (Coleoptera: Dermestidae), a cosmopolitan species that can be a pantry pest.  Because their larvae will feed on such a wide variety of organic materials, complete control can be difficult. See
http://tinyurl.com/p7zqooo for more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4707  Hello, I'm submitting this photo of an insect I found in a box of Christmas decorations (hence the sparkles on its back).  Located in Port Severn, Ontario. Found in January. Could you help me identify it? Thank you. Sara
This is a nymph of a cockroach, but I’m not sure that I can provide a more specific identification.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4706  Hello. Looking for help identifying this bug that we found in our North Toronto home on the living room floor on January 4, 2014 Thanks!  Jen.
This appears to be a nearly mature nymph of Reduvius personatus, an assassin bug (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) known as the masked hunter. They are reported to have an extremely painful bite, and should be treated with caution. See no. 4434 for an example of an adult and
http://tinyurl.com/mwq56m for more detailed information. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4705  This insect was found on tree bark in southern Manitoba.  Thank you.
This is a female ichneumon wasp in the genus Megarhyssa, likely Megarhyssa atrata. She is using her long ovipositor to bore through wood into the tunnel of her intended prey, larvae of wood wasps in the family Siricidae. See
http://tinyurl.com/67kwtqp for an image and more detailed information.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4704 Hello, I’m located in Kitchener, Ontario (Southern Ontario). Since last year, we start to see these spiders in our house in different areas. There is no specific location or time of the year that we see these. Normally these are of size 1cm to 2-3 cms.  Attached picture is what we found today on a wall and is of size of 2.5 cms with legs open. Please help us identifying this spider including if this is a dangerous in nature and how to control these. We have kids at home and scared of getting this to an infestation level.  Thanks for your help!  G B
Unfortunately, the condition of this spider precludes a definitive identification – it might possibly be a sac spider in the family Miturgidae (see
http://tinyurl.com/k5355 for an example). The only spider species in Ontario that truly can be dangerous to humans is the northern black widow spider, see http://tinyurl.com/mkjwanm for an image.   Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4703 I found this running out of some clothing I had at a hotel.  I am in southeastern Michigan. It doesn't look like it has wings.
This is a bristletail, a primitive insect in the order Zygentoma (formerly Thysanura). Some members of the family Lepismatidae, such as silverfish and firebrats, can be nuisance pests. See
http://tinyurl.com/mc5vk7j for more detailed information, including control recommendations.  Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4702 IN Brantford Ontario, Jan 1st. Average January Conditions.  Have been below zero this entire week. I have found them in one room only, that has common household plants. Within the last week I have found 4 of these bugs in different spots…floor, ceiling, wall. Any help would be great in identifying this bug. Sara.
This is a short-snouted/broad-nosed weevil (Coleoptera: Curculionidae; subfamily Entiminae). The adult beetles typically feed at the margins of leaves, giving them a notched appearance; the larvae typically are root feeders, and some can be serious garden/agricultural pests. However, the ones you find indoors simply are seeking winter shelter, and will do no harm there. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.
4701 Hello, My name is Bryn from Toronto, Canada. Please help me identify these small insects I found in my apartment during the fall and winter. They are red/brown beetle-like insects 1-3 mm in size. I found these small insects crawling on the floor or in the window sill, usually in a well-lit room or during the day. I have only seen the adults, not the larvae, but I live in an old apartment building and there are many places for them to hide. Possible sources: wool carpets, dried goods or household plants.  
The specimen on the left appears to be the remains of a planthopper in the superfamily Fulgoroidea. The one in the middle might (and I stress ‘might’) be somewhat crushed carpet beetle (Coleoptera: Dermestidae). I hesitate even to guess at the identity of the beetle on the right - if at all possible, please submit a clear image from a  dorsal (top side) aspect. Ed Saugstad, retired entomologist; Sinks Grove, WV.

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