Canadian Pest Control for all provinces: British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick. Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland  
How to control, get rid of,  eliminate, kill, exterminate, eradicate or manage bed bugs, sow bugs, spiders, wasps, ants, rats, mice and other  pests. Bug identification.

    
         
A close look at pests.
        A close look at pests


PEST CONTROL CANADA

 Pest Information & Control Solutions


                           Pest professionals directory

Directory of Pest Professionals 

 

www.PestControlCanada.com

 

Smart advertisers put their money where their mouse is.                                                 Contact us        Privacy policy        Disclaimer notice    

 

Home Page

Send us your photos for identification

 What is this pest?
Click to enlarge

4000+ Photo I.D.'s
Visit the
pest photo identification pages.
 


Q & A
Ask the experts.
Recent pest questions

employment openings

 Classified Employment  Ads.
 
For Canadian pest management businesses and job seekers

How to Choose a professional

Find a local professional 

Aassociations.
Canada:  CPMA
B.C.:
  SPMA-BC 
Ontario 
SPMAO
Quebec  
AQGP
International :
NPMA
Ants
Bed Bugs
Bird Control
Controlling pests
Employment ads: Pest Control
Insects
Integrated Pest Management.
Mold
Organic Pest Solutions
Other Pests
Pesticides
Types of pesticides

Pest control supplies
for consumers

for professionals

for bed bugs

Rodents
Spiders
Wasp Traps

West Nile Virus

Web site directory for professionals
Wildlife Control

 

Please visit our sponsor's web pages:

5 Star Cain Pest Control     Toronto

AAA-Quest Pest Management  Toronto

ABC Pest Management
Vancouver

Aero Bird Control
Vancouver

Braemar Pest Control
Atlantic Canada

Cal-Rid Exterminators Calgary

Care Pest & Wildlife Control  - Vancouver

Cameron Groupe
Quebec

Central Extermination
Montreal

Cranbrook Pest Control
East/West Kootenays, BC

Debbie Expert
Montreal

Ecopest  Edmonton

Environmental Pest Control
Southern Ontario

Holey-Moley Mole Control Vancouver

Environmental Services Group Inc.

Integrated Pest
Supplies Ltd.
 Vancouver

Kania traps info
 National

Nimby Pest Management
Southern Ontario

The Pest Detective
Greater Vancouver

Professional Ecological Services Victoria

Purity Pest Control Ltd.  Toronto

P.C.S. Gulf Islands
Gulf Islands

 

If you like this web site please tell others about it.

     PEST CONTROL CANADA
 
 A special place for Canadian Consumers

Ask the Pest Control Experts.
Insect Pests: Questions and answers 

Other Question and Answer Pages:

Note: The volume of questions is much greater than we are able to post on this page.
We have selected questions that we feel are of interest to most of our web site visitors.

 Click on the subject: of interest

Insect Pests Questions and answers.

Ants
Bed bugs
Bees
Box Elder Bugs
Carpenter ants
Carpet beetles
Cockroaches
Fleas
Flies
Gnats
Ladybugs
Maple Bugs
Other Bugs
Powder Post Beetles
Silverfish
Sow Bugs (Pill Bugs)
Spiders
Stored food product insects
Wasps

Animal pest  questions and answers
   
Mice, rats, raccoons, moles, bats, birds, snakes,
    and other wild animals. 

Pest Control Business Questions 
    Licensing, certification of pest professionals. 
    Fumigation

Electronic pest devices

What is this bug?   Send us your photos or help us identify the
                                pests pictured on this page.

 

To ask your question click here.         
 To post an answer, choose a question number and click here.
 
Ants

The answer to your question may be on 
one of the 
pages below:

Ants
Ant nest photos 
   
Ask the experts
,  
Bats

Bees

Birds
,  
Carpenter Ants

Canadian Pest Management Association,
   
Carpenter ant photos,

Choosing a pro, Cockroaches, 
Controlling

   pests
Finding a Pro,
  
Fleas

Getting rid of Carpenter ants 
Hantavirus,
   
Home page

Insects

I.P.M. 

Mice

Moles

Moths,
  , 
Other pests

Powder post
   beetles,
Raccoons
Rats

Real Estate &

   Pests,
Rodents, 
Snakes

Spiders,
 
SPMA of BC
,  
Sow Bugs

Supplies for pest control

Termites, 
Wasps
,  
Wildlife pests
 

Pest pro Associations
C.P.M.A.  (Canada)
SPMA BC ( B.C.)
SPMAO    (Ontario)

Add your listing to the directory of pest professionals in Canada.

 

 

#170
We live in Michigan and our weather has been unusually warm for March. About two weeks ago, my husband and I replaced our kitchen floor and discovered we had numerous types of ants living with us. We managed to kill off a tiny swarm of ants with no problem.
Recently, we have been invaded by flying ants that only appear in the evening. A swarm of them group under our kitchen light and drop to the table after a few minutes. I have identified these ants as "flying ants" and not "carpenter ants". They are black in color, three sections to their body, and one set of clear white wings.
Where do we begin to look for their nest? How can we get rid of them? Will they only bother us temporarily? Please help!  DeeMarie;  Sterling Hts, MI
The only ants that will swarm in Michigan at this time of year (March), are reproductive carpenter ants. You are likely seeing males with wings, a small head and pointed  abdomen (not rounded tail). They do not fly too well but will head to a light source, usually a window during the day, a light at night.
The male ants are harmless. They will all die without chewing anything in your home, but they represent a very, very small percentage of a nest that has been in your home for at least 3 to 5 years. The workers in this nest could be doing serious structural damage. The reproductive females will emerge when they think the right conditions exist (mild weather). Because this nest has been there for some time, there are likely other satellite nests relating to the same colony. Don't waste your money and time on "ant poison" or the silly little tin ant traps.  The nests must be found and treated. For more information go to Getting Rid of Carpenter Ants.
 
Question #132
I have had a professional pest control company dust the crawl space of my home and return on 3 occasions to follow up with spraying for small sugar ants. ants still appear in my pantry. how long should it take for these ants to die off completely?  Dina.   Newburg, Oregon
Dusting and spraying for ants does not work. I did it for years and wasted chemical, time and money. You have what sounds like moisture ants. They are tiny, persistent and very numerous. i found the best way to treat these creatures is with a product called maggottox. It is a diazinon product that comes in little granules. Can be bought in a seed supply store or a Home Depot. Sprinkle it liberally around where they are coming up, or as close to their nest as possible. Keep doing this until they are all gone. It sometimes takes a while. I can't give my name as the competition will know what I use. I will watch this site and rewrite your question if the problem persists.
The name "sugar ants" is often used improperly for a number of species of ants, some of which live underground, coming out only to gather food. It is difficult to eliminate underground nests using dusts or liquid pesticides.  New ant baits may work but they do require patience. You may wish to consult another pest professional that has experience using ant bait.
#192
I have a mountain Ash tree in my front yard and have been noticing that every year it seems to be doing worse than the year before. I have discovered that there is an ant nest near the base of the tree that seems to get larger every year. I have tried some over the counter insecticides and traps but without any success. Is there a way that I can get rid of these ants without hurting the tree? Or is it too late to save the tree?
Question #120
I have ants in my apartment (little tiny light brown ones.) I've had the pest control company that takes care of my apartment building come in and apply a gel (poison foodsource) and boric acid dust to the pipe chases but it's been about 4 weeks and they're more in numbers now than before. I know where they reside mainly and have followed their movements but I don't know how to get rid of them. I believe their nest is behind my bathroom mirror / medicine cabinet. How can I get rid of them (before they get rid of me) so that they go away and do not return? I don't believe they are going for the poison gel. Also, I have 2 cats that I don't want injured by poison. The cats do not go in the bathroom where the ants are but I've noticed that the ants are now starting to spread out to the dining room where the cat food was located.  Ted.   Ottawa,
There is a very good answer to your question in the reply to question #115 below.
Question # 115
In my condo building we have a bad ant infestation. They have treated the entire building twice now without success, the last time visiting every suite. I'm told the ants are Pharo ants- redish brown, approx. 2-3mm (very small). They treated with a carbohydrate borax bait. Is there anything more powerful that can be used to keep them out of my suite, something that can be sprayed on the perimeter? Thanks, Wayne, North Vancouver
     I am involved in a similar situation. Pharaoh ants can be very difficult to control. These very tiny ants (perhaps 2mm in length), have the special ability to form satellite colonies by workers becoming reproductives - which means unlike a lot of other types of ants, they have an amazing capability of getting "deep" into building. The key to controlling ants with baits is to ensure that the bait medium is one which will attract the ants to the bait itself so they can get the toxin.
     Treating for pharaoh ants requires real persistence and follow-up. A "one shot" treatment will not work.
     There are some very good baits specifically designed to appeal to pharaoh ants - some designed to appeal to most ants. I don't wish to name a particular product, but there are ant baits on the market which advertise that they are composed of dual formulations (both sugar and protein). It is important to place the bait in the right places where the ants will find it.
     It is also useful to look at the outside of the condo building to see if there were or are factors that are enabling these ants to do well outside the building. Pharaoh ants do feed on dead insect matter, so if there is a situation where lighting attracts lots of flying insects, that could have been a point of where the primary infestation started, though of course it could conceivably have been brought in (though not that likely).
Outside treatment may also be a useful part of a total building treatment.    
     This is not an easy situation.. and for condo owners, there is a focus of co-operation that may not be the same in a rental building. Condo owners may not be overly concerned about spending $15 or $20 on baits whereas this can represent a significant expense for a landlord.  
     If you have a professional firm doing this work, then the total approach they offer is what really tells you how good they are. Charging for one time treatments and then saying "bye bye" is not a good approach. Quality assurance by complaint is not quality assurance at all. A good proposal for the elimination of these ants may involve a program that goes on for a number of years. The cost should be balanced against the kinds of follow-up the firm will provide as part of the treatment agreement.
     If the condo corp. decides to do control through co-operation, then you could buy the bait and distribute to every condo owner. A good information instruction sheet should be given to each owner. Each owner must also be informed that the responsibility for placement is his/her own. A really top notch pest control firm might even offer to sell you the material and provide support but not actual placement.
The end result depends on condo owners letting the management know that they still are having a problem so that the treatment can be continued or upgraded.
     Getting them totally out of the structure could take a couple of years, but the overall results should be pretty good in the first few months. Let us know how you make out with this.. 
Sam Bryks
Manager, Pest Control TCHC (Toronto Community Housing Corporation)
 
Question #139
Please advise: I have very tiny light brown ants in the kitchen they come and go from time to time. I was told by someone with the state to use a mixture of boric acid powder mixed with jelly and spread it on pieces cardboard and put them around where the ants are. My question: is there a particular jelly or honey that would be preferred that would attract them more? How much of each is recommended to mix? I was advised the boric acid makes them burp and this is how they are eliminated. Thank you for your suggestions.  Kim.  LA
"make them burp" -- funny.. that is pure nonsense... fun, but pure nonsense..

But the remedy is an old one and not a bad one. You probably have Pharaoh Ants.. not easy to eliminate as they can have multiple colonies in a house.. when a few of them become separated from the main colony, they can actually start a new colony ... the key to controlling them is to get them to feed on the bait with boric acid. They then go back to the colony and feed others till eventually it kills all of them. There are some products on the market for ants which also work well. The key is to not make the poison ( bait with boric acid) too strong. Boric acid is a toxin that eventually kills them. Keep checking the bait placements and move them after a few days if you don't see any ants on them. When they find one they will keep returning to it. by the way, this is what professionals should be doing as well. The cost of the treatment is largely due to the fact that they need to come back a number of times. Some people would rather a professional handle this. But it is not that hard to do. Remember to read the label of the boric acid, and keep out of reach of children or pets.  Sam Bryks
Manager, Pest Control TCHC (Toronto Community Housing Corporation)

Question # 42
I was wondering if anyone could help to identify and fix the problem I have. There are little tiny (I think ants) that are beige in color in my house, they seem to like crackers and going into box stuff I have in my kitchen. I was wondering if anyone new what they were and how i could get rid off them. if you could help it would be greatly appreciated. 
 J.M. from Ottawa, Ontario.
My guess is that the insects you find are not ants but are some sort of stored product pest, possibly a saw-toothed grain beetle.
I recommend that you collect some of the insects and have them properly identified. Many pest control companies will identify insects for you. Once the insects are properly identified, you can find out what can be done to control them. Bob Lucy
Professional Ecological Services Ltd., Victoria.
www.pestvictoria.com                       services@pestvictoria.com
 
Question # 27
I live in Calgary, Alberta and have a huge amount of ants in my back yard. They bite my dog and I want to get rid of them. What can I use that wont be hazardous to my dogs health?  Shelah
Secure and protected ant bait stations (poison) are now being used by professionals. They may be available to the public but you would have to check with a registered pesticide dispenser (garden shop?) These will work for many species of ants, but not carpenter ants. Try to identify what type of ant it is.  
A local professional may be able to make some suggestions, or you could ask how much they would charge to solve your problem. 
Question # 26
We have tiny black ants entering our house from the door jam. I looked outside and can't see any, so it seems they are in the walls. We tried ant traps but the ants will not touch them. Is there anything that can be done?     Steve.
Some of the ant poisons may work for these ants. Place a very small amount (just a few drops) along the trail they follow, and replace it with fresh as needed. Try to place the drops in a sheltered area where they will not be stepped on by pets. There are many species of ants and they have different feeding habits. Proper identification might help you find the right information.
Question # 25
We have ant hills in our yard and find it very hard to get rid of. Is there anything we can do to destroy the hills? We live in northwestern Ontario Canada. thank you.  Michele
 
Please check the answers to questions 26 & 27. Many ants are considered beneficial insects. Apparently there is a type of thatching ant in Europe  that is protected and it is against the law to destroy the nests.  Are these ants a pest causing a problem?
Question # 19
We have flying black ants in our house. We generally only see them at night and are more prevalent when the evenings are warmer. Do you have any suggestions for controlling them? Bev.
A little more information will help please. How big are these ants? (There are likely 2 sizes)
When did you see them? How many days did you see them? Where do you live?
If these are large ants have a look at the carpenter ant digital microscope photos here then check this page:  getting rid of carpenter ants
Question # 16
I often find ants that are similar to carpenter ants running around on my front step and everywhere else. They are around the same size as carpenter ants and are black but they have a red thorax. They live in dead wood and in the ground and they attack me when i am near their nest. Could you please help me to identify them? Thanks,  Spencer
They could be Vicinus carpenter ants.  One of our sponsors in Victoria has some excellent ant identification information on their web site: www.pesvictoria.com .  You could also check our page of Digital microscope carpenter ant photos. 
 
To ask your question click here.          
To post an answer, choose a question number and click here.

Back to list of topics

Box Elder Bugs  
Question #105
We have had these terrible bugs all over the south side of our house. They are only out during the day because of the warm sun on the house. We have always called them "box cellar bugs." (red/black and they fly) I am not sure if that is the correct name for them or not. I heard to spray hot, soapy water on them and that will get rid of them. We have been doing that but we keep getting more. They are all over the door frames, siding and they do get into the house. How do you get rid of them? I see they are getting into the cracks of the house also around the doors. What attracts them to the house and why would they be so bad this year? I know everyone is suffering this year with them. We have had very warm weather for this time of year. HELP.... Jo.     Merrill, Ia.
You probably have box elder bugs. You will find your answers on this page.
Question #99
Is there any way to get rid of a TONNE of Western Box-elder bugs a.k.a 'Maple bugs', scientific name 'Leptocoris rubrolineatus' on your own? They are invading my house, and I need a cheap & effective way of getting rid of ALL of them. (I'm poor, please help me...) Thanks, Sara.   Alberta
There is a good reply to another Maple Bugs question (#69) on the questions about insects page.

Back to list of topics

Carpenter Ants

The answer to your question may be on 
one of the 
pages below:

Ants
Ant nest photos 
   
Ask the experts
,  
Bats

Bees

Birds
,  
Carpenter Ants

Canadian Pest Management Association,
   
Carpenter ant photos,

Choosing a pro, Cockroaches, 
Controlling pests

Finding a Pro,
  
Fleas

Getting rid of Carpenter ants 
Hantavirus,
   
Home page

Insects

I.P.M. 

Mice

Moles

Moths,
  , 
Other pests

Powder post beetles,
Raccoons
Rats

Real Estate & Pests
,
Rodents, 
Snakes

Spiders,
 
SPMA of BC
,  
Sow Bugs

Supplies for pest control

Termites, 
Wasps
,  
Wildlife pests
 

Pest pro Associations
C.P.M.A.  (Canada)
SPMA BC ( B.C.)
SPMAO    (Ontario)

Add your listing to the directory of pest professionals in Canada.

 

#163
They are always showing up in one of the bedrooms which is located in the basement of my house. I am presently using (Ant and Roach Insect Dust by Green Earth). It is killing them, but there are always more of them coming out. Please help, I want to get rid of them totally. How do I get rid of these carpenter ants and how do I find where their nest is?
Sandra D.  Aylmer, Quebec
Carpenter ants are one of the most common and most difficult pests to deal with in North America.  The products you are using may have some effect on the ants you are seeing, but less than 10% ever leave the nests. I suggest you read the information about them on our feature pages listed in the right hand column of this page. "Carpenter Ants", "Carpenter Ant Photos". "Getting Rid of Carpenter Ants".
#154
I have what I believe to be carpenter ants in my home, We burn wood and perhaps they came in on the logs now stored in the basement. This is the first year this has happened. Now I have been using various poisons, including ant traps, A liquid called "ants b gone" and "Insectigone" ant killer. This stuff is not working , can you please help.
Thank You,  Kevin
Carpenter ants are one of the most common and most difficult pests to deal with in North America.  The products you are using will work for some ants but not Carpenters.  You will find plenty of information about them on our feature pages listed in the right hand column of this page. "Carpenter Ants", "Carpenter Ant Photos". "Getting Rid of Carpenter Ants".
Question #127
We have moved, temporarily, to an older home in the Country. There are Carpenter Ants everywhere. We will only be living here until mid February. In February when we move, is there a way to ensure that we do not bring any of the ants with us. I do know that there are reproductive males and this is my main concern. When we leave we will be disposing of all food products so none will be coming with us. If we leave our packed boxes in the garage of our new home, in the cold, for a certain period, will this ensure that no ants will be brought into the new home? I believe the ant colonies are quite well established where we are as (according to the owner) they have been here for a few years.  Thank you. 
 Renate.  Chelsea, Quebec.
If you do move a few carpenter ants to your new home they will not start a new nest or colony without a queen. Reproductive females rarely nest in a home.  They must lay their eggs in a very damp location. The reproductive males will all die after mating.  For more information see the carpenter ant pages.
Question #123
HELP - WE HAVE FOUND CARPENTER ANTS....BELIEVE THE OWNERS OF HOME BEFORE US USED PESTICIDE SERVICE. AM TRYING TO FIGURE OUT HOW TO GET THE PESTICIDE OUT OF THE KITCHEN CABINETS. I GOT VERY ILL WHEN WE REMOVED THE CABINET KITCHEN DOORS......SHE WAS A COOK AND HAD A STORE AND SOLD FOOD. I'VE BEEN VERY ILL IN THIS HOUSE SINCE REMOVING CUBOARD DOORS...CAN YOU HELP? AM DESPARATE. AM ASSUMING THEY SPRAYED FOR ANTS CAUSE THERE RAE ALOT AROUND HERE - YOUR HELP IS DESPARATLY NEEDED. - THANKS.  Jackie
If pesticides were present in the cupboards, they would not become airborne unless a dust was used. A mild solution of bleach and water will neutralize exposed pesticide residuals. If you think pesticides are causing your illness, ask your Doctor to arrange for blood tests to prove it or otherwise.  If a non-licensed person applied pesticides, there is a chance that the wrong product was used or applied in excess. 
#180
Should I be concerned seeing carpenter ants in the house in winter? If this is a problem, what should I be doing?  Dee,   Alberta, Canada.
Carpenter ants emerging inside a house in the winter are a definite symptom of nests in the structure. If any of them have wings, they are reproductive males or females that came from a satellite nest that has been established at least 3 years and there are likely other nests.  The ones you see are not the problem.  Only a small percentage leave the nest.  You should be concerned about the workers in the nest(s) that could be doing serious structural damage.  Don't spray pesticides. Check out our carpenter ant pages for some helpful tips. It might be wise to contact a professional.     Alberta Pest Professionals.
Question # 60
In reading through your website, I think I had carpenter ants - I originally thought they were black wasps. I saw about 4-5 in late to early spring this year and have not seen any since. Does that mean I no longer have a problem with them?  Elaine.  Toronto, Canada
If you saw large ants in your home before they were moving around outside, you likely have at least one nest of Carpenter ants in your home. Once established they do not leave. Read all the details and see the photos on our featured Carpenter Ant Pages
Question # 31
We have a cedar window frame that appears to be infested with some kind of bug. We don't see the critters themselves, but every couple of days, we find debris that looks like  sawdust or ground up insulating material on the inside window sill, particularly at the base of the vertical pillars. I have seen ants in the room a couple of times. There were not many of them and they were very small -- less than an eight of an inch. I have sprayed the window sill with ant poison and put out traps all to no avail. Does this sound like carpenter ants. We live in Ottawa Thanks,  Geoff
The very small ants are not carpenters, but 2 or 3 species of ants can be found in a home at the same time. If the ground up insulation material is Styrofoam, you likely have carpenter ants. Ant traps will not work. Insecticides will kill ants they contact, but not those in the nests. Check the carpenter ant featured pages
Question # 21
In the bathroom, I continually hear what appears to be (and this may sound strange) crackling noises, much like rice krispies emanating from the ceiling. My concern is that it may be either an ant colony or termite colony. Any suggestions?  Adrian.
I often tell my customers to listen for the rice krispy song: " snap, crackle and pop."
It is almost always a sure indication that carpenter ants are chewing something. Check the carpenter ant pages for more information. Is anyone else familiar with this sound? 
www.nobugs.ca  
Question #11
I have had an invasion of small black ants throughout my house. I've set out ant baits and nothing works. Now I've notice over the past 2 months that I have black flying ants (not termites. Can an exterminator take care of these problems or is there something that I can do. Thank you for any info you can give.                                                  
You would be wise to capture one of these insects and take it to a local pest control professional for identification. (use this directory to find one near you)  It sounds like you may have carpenter ants and  ant baits available to the consumer will not work.  You can read more about them on the carpenter ant pages
Question #10
I have black half inch insects in my basement, it might be cockroaches or beetles which fly around and crawl on walls. My question is do beetles fly? And how do I get rid of them?     Pat                                                                            
Your problem may be carpenter ants.  Read the reply to the question above.  
Question # 5
I paid to get my house fumigated for carpenter ants 2 years ago and they are back again now.  The company has a 3 year guarantee but wants to charge me again. Is this righ
t?
Bill L.  
As a consumer also I would definitely want the warranty honored.  I guess the way to really find out what to do is look at how much you had paid for the service. If you paid an arm and a leg go after it. If you got the service for a song use someone else. This happens in every industry!
Ted B.,    Environmental Pest Management,    Niagara Falls
Watch out for the "tire guarantee"  It guarantees you go back to the same place to spend more money. A reputable business will guarantee to solve your problem and suggest ways to prevent a re-occurrence. It is impossible to guarantee carpenter ants will not return in some environments. Read the fine print or better yet, deal with someone with a good local reputation.   Anonymous 
Dear Sir:
I know that in our area of business (north Vancouver island )
that most companies offer a 3 year package. 1 year full guarantee and then a 2 year warranty period with a nominal fee for service in the 2 year warranty period. This charge is basically a charge to cover chemicals and equipment use during the warranty period. A fair number of consumers hear "3 year guarantee" and actually don't understand fully the warranty aspect. Hope this helps.   
Randy Standish,   Public Pest Control Ltd. , Courtenay, B.C.
Question #2
I would like to know if you think Cayenne Pepper would have any effect on carpenter ants?   
I would prefer not to use  chemicals if possible.  Thank you.    Marcelle.      
If it did work I would have made very little money in the pest control business in the past 10 years and I could be rich now if I was selling cayenne pepper here. 
Larry C.;   P.C.S. Gulf Islands, Salt Spring Island.   www.nobugs.ca 

CRANBROOK PEST CONTROL LTD.
Serving the East Kootenay area.

Cranbrook, B.C.
Phone: (250) 426-9586

Local residents, p
lease feel free to send your questions about any pest problems.
E-mail: goldcreekranch@hotmail.com

 Pesticide Applicator Certificate No. 109815

Back to list of topics

Bed Bugs  
Question #118
My children and I ,but mostly my children are getting bitten by some sort of pest. They get 5-10 bites daily. We do not nor never have had a pet of any sort. I believe that they are getting bitten in the house.
I don't think that they are getting bitten in bed because they are not in bed when I discover the bites. I usually discover the bites at bath time. The bites are usually located on their ankles and armpits and the back of the neck and around the underwear line where the band is. Please help!!!!!!
Leana.    Sebringville
Your question is very similar to question #46 on this page. You may have bed bugs and you will find this answer helpful.
There is also a link to some other good information in question #8 on the same page.
Question #8
 
I have bed bugs at home. It is an independent house. I used the raid fumigators two weeks back and the bed bugs seem to have disappeared for a week. But I see them again? What should I do it eradicate them? Where can I get powerful fumigators? Majahid
Editors note: There is a link to an  excellent info sheet on the insects page. Click on "bed bugs" in the list at the bottom of the "insect" page. You should be very cautious about using pesticides on a bed. Consider calling a professional. 

Back to list of topics

Bees  
Question # 32
I have notice some dirt build up on my lawn. When removing the dirt I notice a perfect hole about the size of a pencil. Just now I did the same as previous but notice a fly that looks like a hornet. Do they nest underground if so how does a person get rid of them? I live in Saskatoon.   Rene
You may have wild bees nesting in your lawn, especially if it is quite a dry area.  They are beneficial insects and should not cause any problems so it is best not to get rid of them.  You can read about them on our bee page.      

Back to list of topics

Carpet Beetles  
#175
I have positively identified black carpet beetle larvae invading my apartment. I do not have carpet, rather wood flooring and have ascertained that they are emerging from cracks between the floor boards (I have seen them come out while washing the floor). The building I am living in is approximately 90 years old and as the previous tenants were horrendous housekeepers, it is likely that they are living on accumulated hair and other debris underneath the floor. I have inspected all clothing, furniture and area rugs and have had my floors treated with a synthetic peremethrin solution. Unfortunately, I am unable to remove the flooring to treat underneath. I have been finding dead larvae throughout the past week, but am interested in finding out what my chances are for a thorough reduction/elimination of the infestation in light of my inability to directly treat under the floors. Please help! Thanks! Vivian; Boston, MA

Adult carpet beetles fly freely feeding on pollen and nectar on flower heads during the summer months. The larvae need a high animal-protein diet and occur naturally in dry birds' nests. They appear in domestic situations infesting carpets, clothes, animal furs and skins (including stuffed specimens) and are often associated with bird nesting activity in eaves and roof spaces. The female beetle lays the whitish eggs in or on a suitable larval food. Continuously feeding, the larvae grow by moulting several times before pupating inside the last larval skin. They will damage the fibers of carpets, bedding and clothing, animal fur, skins and leather and sometimes the heads of sweeping brushes and mops. In other situations they will frequently eat and damage stuffed animals and dead insects. If materials are heavily infested they should be removed and destroyed. Infested areas should be cleaned thoroughly using a nozzle vacuum cleaner concentrating on removing debris and larvae from cracks and crevices. An application of a residual insecticide should then be made to the area, concentrating on treating cracks and crevices. Dust formulations, including desiccant dusts, will be effective but may be vacuumed away in subsequent cleaning.  

#174
For about 2 months we have had the odd small black six legged bug approximately 1/8 inch long with what appears to be a sucker at the front in our basement bathroom. We went away for 5 days this past weekend to come home and find they had multiplied and to our knowledge were still in the bathroom only. Yesterday I scrubbed with lysol and sprayed with household raid which does kill them on contact..well today the have rebelled and they are everywhere in my basement. They seem to like the areas of high moisture better.ie laundry room and bath. I can not seem to identify these little pests but they are taking over my house. PLEASE HELP ME!!!! I hate bugs! I want to get rid of them before they reach the upstairs. Thank you and I hope you may be able to identify them with this description. They also have very hard outer bodies. You can hear them crack when you kill them and they do not appear to have wings. The legs are spread out over the whole body and when you go near them they recoil their legs and look like a piece of lint. Thank you again. Laurie lee; London, Ontario
You may have carpet beetles. They have the ability to pull their legs and head into the hard shell (like at turtle) in self defence. The photo on the right is one species of carpet beetle.
Question # 65
We have a "beetle-like" pest in our house. I have found mainly dead ones, but occasionally I find one that is living trapped in a container it can not get out of. I have found them in the bedrooms, basement, but mainly the kitchen in cupboards and drawers.
 It is mainly black, with a beige stripe across it's back, on the midsection of its body. There is little black specks on the beige stripe, and three tiny V's across the width of it's body. It is approximately 1/4 of an inch long. It almost looks like a fly, without wings. Please help me identify this insect so that I can get rid of it from our home. Thanks.  Heather.
Without an actual specimen or an image, identification is always a best guess situation, but from your description it sounds as if you have what are called Variegated Carpet Beetles. This is a very common beetle in the group known as Dermestid Beetles (dermes=hide), and are a very hardy group that will feed on almost any organic material they can find from dead insects to cotton fibers. The larva are a curious narrow oval shaped furry "almost wormlike" critters. You may have these in some foodstuffs in your pantry. They are relatively slow breeding compared to some other beetles, but these critters are very very hardy, and can survive on almost nothing. The best approach is to do a very thorough vacuuming in your home. Check all ingredients in your pantry.. especially older boxes of cereal or flour or cake mixes.. or anything you have. You might put out glue boards in closets (use either tent or box style glue boards). This helps to catch some of them so you can see the extent of the problem.. But really, the very best solution is getting out your vacuum cleaner and vacuuming EVERYWHERE.
I don't recommend using insecticides in this situation.
Sam Bryks,  Manager, Pest Control MTHC,  Toronto. email: sam.bryks@mthc.on.ca 
Question #14
 
Recently, we have noticed small brownish-black beetles and their larvae in our home. We believe that they are black carpet beetles. We plan to do a thorough cleaning and spray some home approved pesticides. Since the larvae could be in places we can't see like sweaters, blankets and stuffed toys, we are concerned that they will follow us to our new house. We can't just discard these items. Do you have any suggestions?   Michelle
If you are moving, try putting all the clothing in garbage bags and leave them in a freezer for a few days. Remember to vacuum the underside of upholstered furniture. Follow the pesticide directions carefully and use them sparingly.
Question # 71
We have numerous dark brown worms in our apartment, max length that I've seen is 1 cm. They are attracted to all types of clothing. We have completely cleaned all clothing (incl non-seasonal items), spread moth balls, etc. but nothing seems to work. Any idea as to what these can be?  Janet.
Hi Janet:
Sounds like a type of Carpet Beetle larvae you have there. Do you notice black beetles about the size of a ladybug? They can be destructive and will feed on a wide variety of products, including, woolens, silk, cotton, leather and pretty well any type of dried food products. Control may be difficult. I would definitely consult a professional for an inspection. Thorough vacuuming around the edges and under sofas and sofa pillows will help. Wash any woolens and vacuum drawers out well. Check under stove and fridges and clean out well. Check around your laundry room, especially around the dryer. Check through your pantry for infested items. Do you have cats or dogs? Check that food also. Have you had a rodent problem at one time? There are so many things that will attract these insects. In the wild, they will feed on dead animals, fur, feathers, etc. So, indoors any natural product may be attacked. If you have carpets, you can try lifting the edges and see what is underneath the perimeters. Also, check Internet: Carpet Beetles or Dermistid Beetles.  John,  Kelowna, B.C.                          *
There are links to more carpet beetle information on our Insect page.

Back to list of topics

Cockroaches

The answer to your question may be on 
one of the 
pages below:

Ants
Ant nest photos 
   
Ask the experts
,  
Bats

Bees

Birds
,  
Carpenter Ants

Canadian Pest Management Association,
   
Carpenter ant photos,

Choosing a pro, Cockroaches, 
Controlling pests

Finding a Pro,
  
Fleas

Getting rid of Carpenter ants 
Hantavirus,
   
Home page

Insects

I.P.M. 

Mice

Moles

Moths,
  
Other pests
Powder post beetles,
Raccoons
Rats

Real Estate & Pests
,
Rodents, 
Snakes

Spiders,
 
SPMA of BC
,  
Sow Bugs

Supplies for pest control

Termites, 
Wasps
,  
Wildlife pests
 

Pest pro Associations
C.P.M.A.  (Canada)
SPMA BC ( B.C.)
SPMAO    (Ontario)

Add your listing to the directory of pest professionals in Canada.

 

Question #133
Tonight there was an insect scurrying across my counter, which looked to me like a cockroach (it was very fast). I've seen huge ones in Peru, but I can't believe that there would be a cockroach in my apartment. I live on the twelfth floor of a clean apartment building. What are the chances that it was? Are they a possible thing in this area?
Jillian.  Peterborough, Ontario.
High places don't seem to bother cockroaches. They are found on the top floors of high rise apartment buildings around the world. The other suites may not be as clean as you think.  Try to capture one and have a local pest professional identify it. 
Ontario professionals are listed on this page.
Question # 64
How to totally eradicate all the cockroaches in a house? Use pesticide or is there any better way to do it? Or is there any company who can provide the service? Bill.
Bill, if you live in a detached or even in a semi-detached home, you can certainly get rid of all cockroaches. The key is really good sanitation. Not so long ago, the treatment consisted of application of some very strong smelling residual sprays. You can get a pest control firm to do the work. It may cost you in the range of $150 - $200 with year's warranty. If that is the easier way for you.. go for it. But I also suggest that you get some glue traps (a half dozen or more is good) and put them at perimeters in your kitchen (at back of lower cupboards, beside fridge and stove, under fridge is good to.. and where ever you see a potential place they might be.. After a few days.. a week even better, you will have a good picture of the extent of your problem. There are gels available that work very very well, and the homeowner can easily apply this material. These come in names such as Maxforce, Siege, or Combat gel. Some come with applicator as a syringe type of unit with a plunger. If you are handy, and want to save money, this would cost you much less. A 60 gram tube might cost less than 20 dollars. One of those is usually enough for the average home. Read the stuff on this website on roaches to give you a solid understanding. There is another good website called Cockroach Combat Manual out of University of Nebraska with lots of useful information.
I am sure you will be rid of them very soon.. P.S. if you have a fair number... vacuuming is an excellent first step before applying the gel. It removes most of them and it therefore makes your gel more available to ones you didn't suck up in the vacuum.
Sam Bryks,  Manager, Pest Control MTHC,  Toronto. email: sam.bryks@mthc.on.ca 
Question #74*
I just moved into a bachelor apartment in Ottawa. It is part of an old house, but the apartment itself is newly renovated. Within just a few weeks, I have seen about 5 or 6 light tan coloured bugs which run very fast. They tend to be about 1.5 cm long, but can range a bit in size. I don't think I've seen any in the kitchen, mostly running along the hardwood floor. At first glance, they have a spiny look, but I think it is just that their legs stick up. Any idea what they might be? Thanks.  Sarah
Hi Sarah:
It sounds like you may have cockroaches, probably German Cockroaches. If you tend to see more at night and, they scurry when you turn on a light, then that's probably what they are. You should have someone, a professional, inspect and confirm they are Cockroaches. If so, there are some excellent commercially available roach baits. Maxforce gel is one. It may only be applied by professionals, however. I do not advise spraying, as baiting is a much better and safer method. If you live in an apartment, your manager should be aware of this problem. Cockroaches will travel from one unit to another with no problem. So, it is imperative that all the units be inspected. Hope this helps you. Look in the yellow pages and ask some questions. Maxforce is one type of baits available in Canada and works very well. You don't even have to leave the house.   John,  Kelowna, B.C.                                                                                       *
Ottawa area pest professionals are listed in our directory on this page.

Back to list of topics

Fleas

Directory of Pest Management Professionals

 

Question #92*
How do you know if you have a flea problem, and if you've sprayed your house, how long before they all go away and die off? Is extermination expensive? You may not know this one, but if I am a renter with no animals, and I believe the problem was left by a previous tenant, whose paying the bill? Myself or my Landlord? Thanks.  Sarah.   Toronto, Ontario
It sounds like the fleas were there when you moved in and the fleas in the pupae stage were waiting for your arrival. If you have no pets, you are the food source.
A proper spray should include an I.G.R. (insect growth regulator) that will stop the eggs and larvae from developing. All reputable pest management businesses guarantee their work.  Call a few Toronto professionals for pricing.  You will find a list of them in our directory  Toronto page.
Question # 47
My house is infested with fleas, we have left the house and been spraying for a week. we even put the animals outside, but they aren't dying off. what do I do?
It would probably cost less to hire a professional to treat the entire home properly with an insect growth regulator (I.G.R.) mixed with an insecticide to kill adult fleas. One bottle of the proper spray to do it yourself will probably cost about $25 and you will need 4 or 5 bottles to treat the average home properly. 
Flea work as a professional pest control job has literally "dropped off the charts" due to the excellent new flea control products that kill the fleas on the animal. If you have not taken your animals to a vet and either had them treated with one of the new systemic products or even bought it and treated them yourself, then you are in the unending circle. Heavy spraying is not a good solution. It sounds as if you would like to solve this problem yourself, and the costs by a professional firm are considerably more than buying the materials. Many people would rather have the firm do it, and that is fine, but in tight budgets at least you should know that you could do a good job on your own as well. You need to get out your vacuum cleaner and do a most thorough job of vacuuming your home.. especially carpets, furniture and most important, where your animals tend to hang out -- and especially where they tend to sleep. Your vet or a good pet supply store may have a treatment that has a systemic product in it. You would then treat according to the label, especially high risk locations with this product. By breaking the cycle on the animal, you will effectively solve the problem. Pets get fleas from being in contact with other pets that have fleas. If this is the case with your animals (they are outdoors part of the time), then you should consider treating your animals once a year. Best time is probably in mid spring to early summer. Good luck!!
Sam Bryks,  Manager, Pest Control MTHC,  Toronto. email: sam.bryks@mthc.on.ca 

Back to list of topics

 

Flies  
#197
how do we get rid of houseflies? we have a older home which has been renovated. they have been around all winter .tararose
Vernon River, PEI
 

Back to list of topics

Ladybugs  
#198
Dear Sir/Madam, We live in a house that is basically a 200 year old black elm house with board and batton extensions. It is completely porous for ladybugs to infiltrate and they do in great numbers. There is no way to seal the house and as I speak, 2 ladybugs are traveling on my keyboard. How can I rid my house of these pests? Sarah Currie
 
Question #78*
I have black bugs with red markings crawling all over the front of my mobile home. They are 1-2 cm, oval shaped, enjoy the sun and fly a short distance when disturbed. What are they and how can I best get rid of them.  Carolann,  Niagara Falls, Ontario.
We have found an excellent web site dealing with the increased population of ladybugs in Ontario this year along with pictures and descriptions of other species. More information here.
Question # 13
A friend of mine has bugs in his house. He describes them as pillbugs, but are "fuzzy looking", and are black on each end and orangish in the middle. Usually he finds them around his baseboards, which are Oak, and they are usually dead. Any ideas as to what they are? Thanks!   Patrick
Sow bugs and pill bugs are almost identical in appearance. Your description does not indicate either.   You can read about them at our web page here: Sow Bugs. I'm sorry I can not offer an identification based on the description.  Perhaps another pest professional will reply or you could take a sample to a pest professional near you.  
This sounds like it may be a ladybird beetle (ladybug) larva -- which is very different in appearance than the adult. Does your friend have many ladybugs in the area? Check out the picture at the following web site. http://entweb.clemson.edu/cuentres/cesheets/benefici/ce175.htm 
Jamie.  North Shore Pest Detective, Vancouver

Back to list of topics

Maple bugs  
Question # 69
We are experiencing an infestation of maple bugs on our house!! Why does this occur and how do I discourage them from collecting on the siding of our house. Also what pesticide would you recommend, as a last resort.
These bugs are black with a red stripe on their backs. The younger ones look all red and are rather ugly and seem to collect by the thousands!!  David
The Maple or Boxelder Bugs are quite common in the Interior of BC and where Boxelder trees are found. The Best method to control these bugs is really to remove the infested boxelder tree. In the Fall, these bugs will leave their host tree and be attracted to sides of buildings and homes for an over wintering site. The Warm southerly and westerly exposures are the most attractive sites. Treating at the peak time of activity on the home will cut down the numbers only and provide temporary relief. Use a good residual, such as Ambush, and check the label first. They will reappear in the early Spring on warm days also. These bugs are a pest mostly because of their large numbers. Otherwise, they will not cause any damage or bite. They feed on juices from their host trees. So, if possible remove the tree or trees. If not, call a tree sprayer and inquire about a annual spray program on infested trees. This will help but keep in mind Maple bugs can fly from quite a distance too. Maple bugs normally show up year after year if there is an infested tree. Hope I was informative.
John,   Kelowna, B.C. 

Back to list of topics

Other Bugs

The answer to your question may be on 
one of the 
pages below:

Ants
Ant nest photos 
   
Ask the experts
,  
Bats

Bees

Birds
,  
Carpenter Ants

Canadian Pest Management Association,
   
Carpenter ant photos,

Choosing a pro, Cockroaches, 
Controlling

   pests
Finding a Pro,
  
Fleas

Getting rid of Carpenter ants 
Hantavirus,
   
Home page

Insects

I.P.M. 

Mice

Moles

Moths,
            
Other pests
Powder post
   beetles,
Raccoons
Rats

Real Estate &

   Pests,
Rodents, 
Snakes

Spiders,
 
SPMA of BC
,  
Sow Bugs

Supplies for pest control

Termites, 
Wasps
,  
Wildlife pests
 

Pest pro Associations
C.P.M.A.  (Canada)
SPMA BC ( B.C.)
SPMAO    (Ontario)

Add your listing to the directory of pest professionals in Canada.

 

#155
We have a 30' tree in our back yard that is being attacked my a Red headed (rest is black and white) woodpecker. It have made five holes so far and we are afraid that it will kill the tree. The holes are being made at eye level (4-5' off the ground). We want to spray pruning spray in/on the holes but are afraid of killing the woodpecker. Is there anything we can do to save the tree? Thanks in advance, James, Ottawa
There is obviously an insect in the tree that you should try to get rid of. If you use an insecticide spray, Try to wrap the area the birds are attacking with something to keep them away. Talk to a certified dispenser at a local garden shop, or the Later's web site may have some answers.
#195
I have seen several small insects of the following description in my log home.
- about 1 cm in length,
- two distinct body sections, head and larger rear body
- head has two small antennae
- body has two small wings, only visible when it tries to fly from spot
   to spot
- maybe 8 legs
- most distinctive colouring, font third is black or dark brown,
  middle is third is light brown and final third again is black or dark
  brown.    Any ides ?    Ross,    Canada
Question #103
We have flour weevils that keep reoccurring in various parts of the house. We do not have any exposed food (flour/rice etc) that they might be coming from. We have sprayed with Raid House and Garden - which certainly kills them - but they keep coming back. We have found them in closets, bathrooms, kitchen and along baseboards. Does anyone have a solution to track them down to their source and eliminate them???  Patrick.  Oshawa, Ontario
From your description, I don't think you have "weevils" at all. Weevils are a very specific type of beetle that has a modified mouth part into a kind of "snout" with mandibles at the end. They use this to bore into single grains of rice or wheat or other cereals or beans, etc. (depending on species), and then lay a single egg into the opening which they then seal over. What it sounds like you have is more likely a type of carpet beetle. I am speculating on the basis of the information you have provided. There are a number of species of carpet beetles. Variegated is one of the most common, but the black carpet beetle is also very common. These critters are very hardy and can feed on almost anything from hairs, fur, leather, cereals, dead insects,, dead rodents .. whatever they find that is organic. They are very common.. The best approach really is to do a very thorough vacuuming in your home. The larva are unusual little creatures with bristles -- and they are TOUGH..
Check this out on this website (Carpet beetle on list at bottom of insect page) or look on the net under those terms. You will then see if the "weevils" you have are in fact carpet beetles. Best treatment is to find any infested food, or article,, but really the bottom line answer is good houskeeping in general --- they do well in low activity locations and can eat COTTON, or wool. They will do damage to clothes.. Good luck...  Sam Bryks
Business: Manager, Pest Control TCHC (Toronto Community Housing Corporation)
 
Question #147
I found a lot of Indian Meal Molts in my basement, in every box, Christmas ornaments, etc.  I ask somebody for help and they told me that I need to throw everything in my basement outside because there to much of Indian meal molts.  Can you help me, please? An answer as soon as you can.  Irma
If you have Indian Meal Moths in your home you should get rid of anything that shows the evidence. They usually are found in boxes where there is a source of food such as dry cereals, grains, crackers, etc.
Question #102
Hi! I can't seem to get a straight answer from any entomologist. I have even given a sample of the bug! It is tiny almost microscopic, doesn't fly, jump or bite(as far as I know) it looks to be a yellowy gold color and was first found in my bathroom, then I found them in my kitchen and then I just looked at my carpet today and there were some on there. The house is only 20 years old and does not show any signs of water damage. I have been told it is from the booklice family but it looks nothing like that, I have also been told that it is a moisture problem somewhere. We have checked the floor from the basement and everything is in great shape. So far I only have them on the main floor not in the basement. I have bleached, lysoled, vinegared, used even ant bait and nothing seems to get rid of these stupid bugs if someone could give me some kind of insight into this bug that would be greatly appreciated!!!   Ramona.   Alberta.

book lice

Look at one closely under a strong magnifying glass.  If it is similar to this picture, it is likely a Psocid  or book lice. They can only exist in a high moisture environment so they are often found in bathrooms and adjoining rooms.  I have found them in a kitchen wall that had a shower stall on the other side.  There was probably a slight plumbing leak, poor caulking around the tub or they did not use the exhaust fan when needed to remove steam. 

This could also possibly be a Pharoah ant. You may want to investigate it as such.  Richmond Pest Management.
Question #80
For the past couple of days we have noticed that close by our window in the kitchen a dirty looking sand has been falling from a hole. When we looked at it there are little white looking worms about an inch long. Is there any way of identifying what it is? It looks like little maggots.
 
Could it be??? and from what??  Thank You.   George.     Toronto.
There are a number of larvae that tunnel in wood along with termites and carpenter ants. Try to remove one of the "worms" and take it to a pest professional for identification. You will find a list of them in the directory
Question #97*
Where can I purchase a Flour Moth Trap (or another non-toxic trap to eliminate the Indian meal moths that are enjoying my rice, dried pasta and popcorn kernels) in Toronto or surrounding areas?
I've had this problem for almost a year and now, although the moths aren't flying around so much anymore, their larvae are definitely causing me to throw away large amounts of dried food.   Karen.  Toronto, Ontario.
The Pheromone traps for Indian Meal Moths are available from a number of firms in Toronto - such as Ditchling Corporation, PCO-Orkin and Abell Pest Control. These traps do help a bit, but they are meant mostly as detection devices not for control so much. You have correctly identified where the moths come from. Solving the problem really requires breaking of the cycle of larva in the food becoming adults, mating and then laying eggs on food and so on. Get the traps by all means to help trap adults, but the best approach is to check ALL potential sources of infestation, throw out what is obviously infested, and either put in freezer (for about three days) or MICROWAVE other suspect food stuffs -- not too high or too long as you don't want to "cook" either the foodstuffs or set the boxes afire, but a minute or so will effectively stop the larva from becoming viable adults if not kill them outright.
Putting these suspect foods into tight containers is also a big help.
Pet Food is particularly vulnerable .. and in my experience, one of the primary sources.. Having had this experience, a shopper can be more aware of checking boxes of suspect ingredients, especially dry pet food, nuts, dried fruits, bulk food -- and cereal boxes, other packages as well. If you see a moth fluttering in a grocery store, you know who the culprit is. This doesn't happen that often, and in my experience it is the circle of a supplier who has not solved a problem to the grocery store.. Once in a grocery store, if the pest management is not good, then it will spread to other products.. The educated consumer might be lucky enough to detect the problem and let your grocery store know. If a product is months old, it is too late. If you find the problem within about a week, you might have a case to show to your grocery store manager, but proving this is not easy. By doing this, you help protect other consumers. Fortunately indian meal moth is harmless to people even you happen to eat a few of the critters.. (sorry!!)
Sam Bryks.  Business: Manager, Pest Control, TCHC (Toronto Community Housing Corporation)
Question # 56
What is the gnat type insect found around fresh produce in stores? What can be done or used to control or rid my produce of them, (without using insecticides )that is not harmful to produce or the consumer? Melissa.
The name "gnat" is commonly applied to about 850 different species of small flies in Canada and the United States. Control will depend on the species, but in general most of those that breed indoors will seek a moist environment. Eliminating moisture around a store produce display is impossible, but practicing good hygiene should help.  Any decaying plant matter that may be present in or under the display should be removed.  Fungus of any kind may be a food source. Thorough cleaning of the display should be routine. Ultra violet light traps can be quite effective, especially when other lights are turned off at night.  These can be safely used near food. Contract a pest professional in your area to have one installed properly.  Location is very important.   
Question #101
I have recently moved into a newly renovated suite, and we have many fruit flies, particularly in the kitchen and bathroom. The number of flies does not appear to have anything to do with fruit or other organic matter left out - and they were present even before we moved in, while the suite was being renovated. Is it possible they are coming in by the water pipes, or by some other way? What might I be able to do to control their population? The cold weather is not having an effect on their numbers.
Jeff.     Halifax, Nova Scotia.
There is a very effective glue board on the market for fruit flies.  The glue is scented with a banana fragrance.  It is manufactured by Catchmaster (see web page) and it should be available from some of the pest professionals in your area.  ( Nova Scotia Pest Professionals)
Question #73*
Need to identify the following bug: 1" long, many legs, hard shelled, tubular shape (looks like tubular centipede), looks jointed-many lines on body, shiny dark brown color, curls up in ball when touched, found in basement, 2 antennae at head, looks like long sow bug. As you identify, please advise how to exterminate.   Glenn
Hi Glenn:
Sounds like Millipedes. Nothing really serious. However, hey do require high moisture areas to survive. They are most likely coming in from outside and wondering in looking for suitable areas. Normally they do not live very long in doors. They do not bite or pose any real concern for the most part. Check your exterior. Do you have a well landscaped( landscape paper), irrigated yard and mulch around the house or rotten wood or some type of excessive moisture condition? Correcting those conditions is usually suitable to achieve control.   John,  Kelowna, B.C. 
Question # 54
Hi, We are experiencing an insect problem in our newly built home. The insects are very small, 2mm, in length, light brown, two antennae, two black eyes on either side of the head and an oval shaped back body with what appears to be a reddish line/mark on them - note: not all have this red mark. They are numerous and we have recently had the house sprayed by a professional with 1% Permethrine. The problem is that he thought they were Pharoah Ants however upon further inspection with a magnifying glass they do not appear to be ants at all. We believe they are of a beetles species however we cannot tell. Can anyone help identify them? Tks.  Kyle.
Where do you live. Pests are regional and it's important to know the location of the pest in order to be able to identify it successfully. Jamie.   North Shore Pest Detective
Question # 50
I have been seeing strange looking, what appear to be insects, around my house for a while now. Some are very, very small (about the size of a very small ant) and some are quite large (the size of a tooney). They appear to be the same type of insect though, but the smaller ones look like they have grains of sand stuck to it's legs. The larger ones are a beige mixed with brown colour, and have flat, large bodies with lighter beige coloured legs. They move almost like a spider, but only have six legs. I have found smaller ones on clothes in hampers and on material that was on the floor. The larger ones have been in door frames (outside doors) and in window frames in our basement. Any help at identifying them would help, I haven't found anything on the web. Thanks!  Shannon.
Where do you live. Pests are regional and it's important to know the location of the pest in order to be able to identify it successfully. Jamie.   North Shore Pest Detective
Question # 46
Dear Pest control;
My child woke up one morning with 40 little bites under his t-shirt (but hardly any on his back). We checked the area around the mattress and found some kind of a shell of an insect approx 5-10mm in length. It was long and narrow and seemed hairy with dark brown and black stripes. The welts were mosquito sized but there was no itching associated with them. In fact we noticed them first. I have searched the web for answers but have been unable to identify this pest. Do you have any suggestions as to what we are dealing with here? Thank you in advance for your assistance. A.G.M.
I don't know how long ago you posted this question, but hope it was not long. The insect you describe doesn't sound like anything generally known. The most common type of insects that cause bites are bed bugs, fleas, and lice. If you do not have pets, then fleas might be excluded, but this would depend also if you live in a detached dwelling or in a location where pets are around. Neither lice nor bed bugs are what one would call "hairy". It is never good when a child is being bitten in their bed. I suggest that you get the sample you found to a professional who can identify it. There are a number of places you could send the sample and get a free I.D. such as your local health department or local university, or a good pest control firm which has a professional entomologist on staff. What you found, might not even be the cause.. Some other useful strategies would be to get some glue boards and put them at the perimeters in your child's room especially in areas near the bed. Also vacuum the bedroom very thorough using a brand new vacuum bag. If the id of the pest is not something that actually bites, then the vacuum bag contents might have the culprit. At worst, you have actually reduced dust and other material in the room as well. you should take out dresser drawers to check inside the dressers and do a very very thorough inspection of the bedroom. There are some things that bite which are less common, but the type of insects that bed in this circumstance are, fortunately, very few. If you have a digital camera or access to one,, take a picture of the critter and you could send it to a professional.. (send it to me if you wish)..Hope this helps a bit.
Sam Bryks,  Manager, Pest Control MTHC,  Toronto. email: sam.bryks@mthc.on.ca 
Question #12
 
I have black half inch insects in my basement, it might be cockroaches or beetles which fly around and crawl on walls. My question is do beetles fly? And how do I get rid of them?     Pat.
Your problem may be carpenter ants.  Read the reply to question 11 here
Question # 45 
I
'm trying to identify an insect found on a peppermint plant in my herb garden, it is not pestering the plant nor myself, I'm just curious to find if the plant attracted the bugs. They are an orangeish color with black, ovalish markings at the tips of the wings. They are also doing a great deal of mating on the plant, anything you could tell me about them would be greatly appreciated.  Nick
If the bug you have looks like this, it is a mint flea beetle.
You can read more about them at this web site:
    http://www.info.ag.uidaho.edu/keys/plates/plate35.htm

Back to list of topics

Powder Post Beetles

Directory of Pest Management Professionals

 

Question #113
I have powder post beetles in some furniture. Someone at work suggested I see whether or not using heat would get rid of them (as it does with termites). Any suggestions?  Tammie.   California
Heat or freezing can be an effective but not always practical way to kill many insects. The problem is applying enough heat without damaging the furniture.  Powder post beetle larvae can burrow quite deep into the wood and getting enough heat to penetrate that distance might be impossible.  I would talk to an antique dealer or furniture restoration expert to see if they have any experience with this problem.  Emerging adult beetles will not lay eggs on a finished surface (paint or varnish)
but may lay eggs on the edge of the hole they emerged from. An insecticide applied to new holes may break the cycle.
#184
We have an insect which seems to be a permanent resident in our new home. We have had the insect checked by three sources, all of whom have something to gain depending on the answer. So far the suggestions include Powder Post Beetle, Rove Beetle (Family Staphylinidae) , Clerid beetles (Family Cleridae) and Bark Beetle. It seems no Pest Control "Professional" has been able to properly identify this insect.
The insect is most active at night. It raises its abdomen in flight, and is reddish brown in colour. During the day there are none to be found, but in the evening they appear fly up from our basement. The home next to us is also infested. It was built the same time of year as ours.
We both have had our homes sprayed (for Powder Post Beetles), but the insects are still present. What I would like to know how we can get these insects properly identified, and what we can do to rid our home of this pest. Does anyone have information on any of the suggestions listed above, if they can damage our home, and how to rid ourselves.
Nadine.   Whitby, Ontario
Spraying a home for powder post beetles will have very limited effect on larvae chewing wood under the surface for a number of years. The spray may kill most the adult beetles that eventually emerge and prevent them from laying eggs to start the cycle over again.  Ask a local pest professional to have the beetle identified by an entomologist.  This should not cost anything if there is no service call required. Have you looked at our Powder Post Beetle page?
A sad testament when you can't get a verified identification of a beetle.. I believe that there is an insect ID lab at Guelph University, and also at the Royal Ontario Museum.. You might call the ROM and ask if they still do insect ID's as they used to some years ago.. What an insect is makes all the difference in determining what kind of treatment (if any) is required. If you wish to send it to me, I'd be happy to have a look. Send to my attention:  Sam Bryks.
Manager, Pest Control Programs Toronto Community Housing Corporation.
(address is in the phone book I am sure...)
Question #144
We are considering buying a 1977 log home with a disclosure of a "beetle infestation", although on the records of the pest control company it says, "old house borers" or "wood borer." None of the records say "powder post beetles." Treated in 1993,'94,'95 with what appears to have been one quart of "bora care". In 1997 '98 '99 and 2001 on pest control check did not need treatment. In 94 the records say "we tried to drill but not very effective." Also written, "sealer doesn't let control penetrate wood." Do these pest reappear after seven years? In the summer? We will have an inspection, but in Feb. not summer if we want to purchase. Any advice? Anyway of knowing how "safe" the house is from reinfestation? Thanks.
Jennifer.   Oakland.
An interesting question for sure.. I don't get too involved in wood pests of late except termites, however, here is some direction. First, don't worry about powder post beetles. The wood is too old for this pest. They tend to be in newer wood and cause problems when the adults emerge. The adults lay eggs on wood depending on moisture and also on starch content. From what you describe, it doesn't sound like these can be problem. I found an excellent information page on Old House Borer which advises how to handle this pest. No need to be alarmed, just to be cautious in what kind of advise you get. Keeping in mind that with a loghouse, there is always a potential for insect pests as the structure itself is mostly wood. But on the other side of the coin, these structures can last for a long, long time and the insect damage is slow and can be managed..  Here is the link. good luck. http://www.wvu.edu/~exten/infores/pubs/pest/hpm6002.pdf  
Sam Bryks
Manager, Pest Control TCHC (Toronto Community Housing Corporation)
Question #143
In March of 2001, i discovered that I had a window infected with the Powderpost Beetle. This was confirmed by an exterminator. The widow was replaced and the supporting was inspected and treated. The beetles were alive and visible in the room. In January 2002, I discovered two more rooms infected with the Powderpost Beetle. In one room, the infected wood was from a window frame. In the second room, the baseboard was infected. I have several dead beetles and dust on the floor.
The builder is removing the trim and baseboards in the house and replacing them with new wood. I have an exterminator coming out to inspect the wood and to look for further damage.
Can these beetles lay eggs and cause further damage in my house?
How can I be sure that the beetles are dead and that no other wood has been infected. Should I be concerned about future problems 10-20 years from now. These beetles have been found in three different rooms in my house. Please advise. Thank you for your help.  John.   Tinley Park.
Powerpost beetles in new houses can happen from time to time. The new lumber was infested while sitting in the yard. This lumber is typically kiln dried, but when it is in a yard for an extended time, the beetles will infest it here and there. That infestation emerges as adults with the typical powder and emerge holes. The point is that when the wood is installed, the larva are probably already in it, and then come out later as adults. Once the wood is finished, adults do not lay eggs on it. It is quite alarming, however, to a new homeowner who has bought a home worth hundreds of thousands of dollars to find this damage in shiny new finished floors or windows. You might ask your builder if he could get window stock that is newer. This might solve the problem. Kiln dried lumber does not have any living insects in it. Hope that helps. Sam Bryks
Manager, Pest Control TCHC (Toronto Community Housing Corp.
 
Question # 33
What pesticide products are registered in Canada for control of powder post beetles in residential homes (log house) and which of these products is considered to be most effective?  Keith.
To the best of my knowledge there are only 2 products registered. Dragnet and Tim-Bor. Both are available only to certified pesticide applicators.  In my personal experience I have used both but prefer Dragnet. I think most pest control professionals in Canada use Tim-Bor and I have not heard any negative comments about it's effectiveness. I don't think a single application of either product can effectively eliminate all powder post beetles in a log home. They should be applied annually at a time when the adults are emerging. The pesticide will not penetrate deep enough to have effect on the larvae which can live for a number of years boring through the wood. Prevention of re-infestation by application of a wood preserving coating should always follow any use of pesticides. It would be interesting to hear from other pest professionals. 
Larry Cross.  www.nobugs.ca 

Back to list of topics

Silverfish

Directory of Pest Management Professionals

 
Question # 70
I live in a multi unit dwelling and am having problems with silverfish. Do silverfish respond to ultrasonic pest control devices? If so what frequency or type would be the best? I do not want to use chemicals as we have cats that we do not want to expose. Thanks. Aaron
Most pest control professionals consider Ultrasonic pest devices a total rip-off. Check the answers to questions 43, 17, 4.  Silverfish are often found in homes with high humidity levels.
Do your best to reduce the humidity by using bathroom fans, stove hood vents and keeping some window slightly open. You can read more about them on this web site:
 http://canadianpest.com/silverfish.htm   Canadian Pest Control, Vancouver
If other residents in the building have the same problem, ask them to consider the same solutions, otherwise the silverfish will survive and multiply in the common walls. 
Question # 68
Can you recommend the best 'non toxic' remedy for silverfish? I need something that would be particularly safe for someone with respiratory problems and sensitivity to chemicals. Donna
One of our sponsors has some good information about silverfish on their web page:
www.pestvictoria.com   (Professional Ecological Services)
See the answer to question 70 above.
Question # 1
Can you please tell me how I can get rid of silverfish in the bathroom. Thanks. Marlene  
Hello Marlene:
One of the most common reasons for a problem with silverfish is high humidity and therefore it is not uncommon to find them in bathrooms. They are a very shy insect and usually stay hidden in the wall voids, cracks, crevices and cavities such as under a bathtub.  Make a serious effort to reduce the humidity in your home and it will eventually reduce the insect population.  Randomly spraying pesticides is not the answer.  If pesticides are used they must be used very sparingly by spraying with a straw tip into any entry points such as along the baseboards. If the problem persists after reducing the humidity problem you should probably call a professional.   J.C. ;   S.Cal.Univ.  

Back to list of topics

Spiders

Directory of Pest Management Professionals

 

Question #125
We moved into our house in March of this year. We have noticed an usually high number of spiders in the house. In April and October we killed an average of 10 per day. They are also around the other months but not to that extent. Just yesterday I killed 3 in my daughters room. They are about the size of a dime and yellowish/pale brown in colour. What kind of spider is it and how do I rid my home of them? Thanks in advance for your assistance. Susan.  Toronto
The vast majority of spiders in the Toronto area that are found in dwellings are harmless. The number that you are seeing is somewhat unusual and is suggestive of some other factors. A pest control professional would be looking at exterior of your home to see what the environment there is -- i.e. lots of trees near the house, what kind of lighting (front porch, backyard, etc.,). These factors help to tell the story of why you may have spiders in your house.
The type of spider is also important. You could get a sample and bring it to the Royal Ontario Museum entomology section. They are happy to let you know what it is. The most common indoor spider in the Toronto area is probably the European black foot spider - these are pale in colour, with dark markings on end of feet - harmless, and usually found at the wall/ceiling junction.
Get some glue boards and attach flat to the wall at the ceiling. I always recommend a very good vacuuming in the house as a great way to get rid of spiders. If anyone recommends spraying inside your house for spiders, they don't know much really about pest control.
Brown recluse spiders are very very unpleasant, but in many years of being in this business, I have not seen a whole of lot evidence of these in the Toronto area, nor of reported bites. That is not to say that we do not have them here, but considering how serious their bite can be in terms of causing damage to skin, I have not yet seen a specific instance and I deal with a lot of homes.     Hope this helps a bit. Sam Bryks
Manager, Pest Control TCHC (Toronto Community Housing Corporation)
Question #91*
I am wondering what the best way is to control a working environment from Black Widow Spiders. We receive product from a plant in Mexico; What is the best way for them to control the infestation of black widow spiders into their product?  Karmholly.   Chatham, Ontario
That is really an interesting and unusual question. Black widow spiders are erratic web builders. These are not the type of spider that moves around a lot in search of prey. They tend to settle in a location and will only move if the catchings are not good. Finding the spiders in product is a rather strange thing --- I would wonder what kind of product it is --- and in what setting the product is manufactured and stored. The best control in this situation is to ensure that there are not any spiders in those locations. This really has to do with the plant itself... what kind of lighting is outside (exterior lights draw flying insects and if you have those, then that is a good place for he spiders to be), what kind of flying insect control do they have, how often do they do a good cleaning of the facilities.
If you got one spider as a one time event, that is one thing, but if you get spiders on a regular basis, it is really a matter of the environment where the product is manufactured or stored.
I find that the best control for spiders is often non-chemical and involves some change of habitat (lighting, insect control) as well as plain simple good vacuuming...
If we had more specifics, could give a more specific response.
Sam Bryks.  Business: Manager, Pest Control, TCHC (Toronto Community Housing Corporation)
Question #6 
I have a lot of spiders in my basement. People say they are good because they eat other insects but I can't stand them! What should I do?   Andrea C. ,     Calgary                     
Most spiders are not harmful but many people have a fear of them. I suggest a good vacuum in the basement to reach all nooks and crannies. This will remove 99 % of the webs and the majority of spiders. Then, buy some insect glue traps from a local hardware store to place in the basement. These gluetraps will last months and are non toxic. They will work day and night to catch any spiders that you might have missed.
Beware of entry points for spiders such as loose doors, windows, torn screens etc. Firewood can also bring large amounts of spiders into your home. If you notice a heavy build-up of spiders outside your home every summer you might consider an application of pesticide outside only by a certified company/ person. One treatment can reduce the spiders so that you are free of them for several more years. Some companies will do the basement cleaning for you also and install the glue traps. Of course, they would be charging for their services. Good Luck. Dean Brown, Fredericton,  New Brunswick 
Question #55
I have found a black widow in my basement suite in Calgary. I identified it by its red hour glass on its underside. I'm worried there's more around. How can I find out and get rid of them?  Mathew.
Webmanager's note: The answer to above question  may be of some help.

Back to list of topics

Stored Food Insects

Directory of Pest Management Professionals

 

#161
I have noticed little moths in my house during the evening...I don't know where they are coming from around this time of the year...I also notice spiders is there any correlation between the two? thanks. AO, Toronto
The moths could be the adult stage of a food pest you have such as Indian Meal Moth. You may look for larvae in any stored dry food. (crackers, cereals etc.) Wild bird seed is a good source of these pests because it is not treated for human consumption.  Don't store it in your home.  The spiders are likely there because there is a food source: other insects.
Question #145
I recently bought a large bag of rice (which I think it has been sitting on the shelf for too long). I noticed there are tiny black or brown bugs that have hard shell. I got rid of the rice, unfortunately, few has escaped and now I've been finding them crawling slowly around. How can I get rid of them and are they harmful in any other ways like damage to wood, etc.
There are a number of beetles that infest stored food products. Without a size or more detail of description it is hard to say which you have. Most common are flour beetles and sawtooth grain beetles. Rice weevils are not generally found in milled rice. It might also be drugstore beetles. There is a list of insects if you click on the insect option .. and that will take you to a number of different links. Here is another one that has the most common of these insects. http://www.uky.edu/Agriculture/Entomology/entfacts/struct/ef612.htm
The best thing to do is to clean the shelves where the product was stored, and check any other products. If you suspect other products, but there is no other evidence, you might try to microwave them for about a minute. That either kills any eggs or that any larva will probably be killed or unable to go through their life cycle. IT is a good idea to keep checking over the next few weeks to be sure. Sam Bryks
Manager, Pest Control TCHC (Toronto Community Housing Corporation)
Question #107
I have a lot of indian meal moth in the basement. I found that in a bag of seedflowers, I got in my basement. Everywhere in the boxes, in my Christmas ornaments also in my things for camping, in the toys for the kids, and they climb into my dinner room wall. I talk to somebody and they send that I have to throw everything away (outside) before they can do something. Is there another way to do that so I can keep my things? It means so much to us. Thank you in advance if you can give me an answer. Irma.  New Brusnwick.
Have a look at the reply to question 97 which deals with the same subject. You don't need to throw anything away or outside, but you do need to check infested product and either get rid of it if badly infested, or put in freezer, or microwave it (see reply to #97). If you need more help, drop a line and I'll get back to you.
Sam Bryks    Sam.bryks@mthc.on.ca
Business: Manager, Pest Control TCHC (Toronto Community Housing Corporation)
Question #106
My friend is renting a two bedroom apartment that is infested with Green Beetles. How long does she have to be out of her apartment for? Her landlady said that for the poison to work she would have to be out of her apartment for two to three days? That is what the exterminator told the landlady. My friend has a two and a half year old son and is very worried that if she moves back in too soon that her son might be affected. Please let me now ASAP. Thank you
From Angela ,  Edmonton.
Do you mean "grain beetles"?  2 or 3 days seem excessive. She should talk to the pest professional who will do the work and ask exactly what procedure and products will be used. As a tenant, she has a right to know this information.  She could then get a second opinion from another professional.

Back to list of topics

Wasps

Directory of Pest Management Professionals

 

Question #83*
I have wasps living in my siding and they aren't paying rent. I have aluminum siding on my house with wood trim around the bottom. I have noticed wasps have a hole to get into and have been living there since at least August. I would like to destroy them before winter so I can seal it up. Since the hole is right beside the front door I would like them gone. The sprays I have seen in the store all seem to deal with contact. I need something to spray up the hole that is residual and will continue to kill them. Please help!
Dave.   Brampton, Ontario.
If you seal up the hole, the over wintering females will not get out and will die in the spring.  If you want to use a residual pesticide blow in some boric acid dust.. 
Question #90*
 Is there means or scheme for locating yellow jacket nests?  Gordon Barr.  Lake Oswego
There are two basic types of yellowjacket activity that you must know about.
The first is when they are searching for and getting food. The wasps fly about "aimlessly" and land on the ground, leaves and other objects. They will pick up live or dead insects and consume honeydew (plant sap excreted by aphids sucking on the plant leaves) and other sweet liquids (such as soda pop). People may say there is a nest in a plant that has a lot of wasp activity but when you watch the wasps you may see that the plant is "buggy" or has a lot of honeydew on it and the wasps are getting this material as food: which means the plant is the wasp's restaurant.
The second activity is when wasps are either flying into or away from the nest, or when they are following a flight path from the nest to a feeding site. The wasps have flight paths that they follow, just like airplanes arriving and leaving an airport. Do not stand in their flightpath, you will likely get stung for your interference. They may have an established flightpath around trees, houses or other objects. You can tell if the path is only a transportation corridor for them because they are not going into a nest.
To find a nest I will stand quietly in one spot and survey the area. For any wasps I see, I follow their flightpath and monitor their activity. If they fly around a lot they are just getting food. If I see them in a determined, straight flight path they are likely going to a nest. I will follow their flight path and then identify the source. The nest may be in the ground, in a woodpile, under a deck, in the side of a building, in the roof or eavestrough, or in a tree.
You may have to stand in a number of different areas. When you look for the wasps, just gaze in one spot and note any activity. Watching is a passive activity. You will not be successful if you hurry, continually move your head and eyes in a grid search pattern or are not patient.
Also, look for wasp activity during the warm part of a nice day. They do not fly at night, when it is cool (such as the early morning) or during bad weather such as rain or high winds.  Check my website for other information.  Alan Vaudry.    Professional Ecological Services,  Victoria, B.C.
Question # 41
Hi: For many years I've been annoyed by wasps when I'm sitting outside on the deck. This year, they made a nest under the deck table, I destroyed it, but they seemed to have proliferated and they are very aggressive. I tried to put a bottle with sugar water in it so they could get caught, but to no success. Are there any simple trick you can give me. I didn't see the latest nest; I've got big trees around the house, but I also thought it was nesting in the grass????? Thank you for your help. I live in Montreal, very urban environment. Bernard.
We have just created a small web page that describes how to make an inexpensive and effective wasp trap.   Check it out.    Wasps
Question # 35 
Hi:  For many years I've been annoyed by wasps when I'm sitting outside on the deck. This year, they made a nest under the deck table, I destroyed it, but they seemed to have proliferated and they are very aggressive. I tried to put a bottle with sugar water in it so they could get caught, but to no success. Are there any simple trick you can give me. I didn't see the latest nest; I've got big trees around the house, but I also thought it was nesting in the grass????? 
Thank you for your help. I live in Montreal, very urban environment.
Bernard
Read the advice about wasp traps and placement on this page.

  Back to list of topics



HOW TO GET RID OF BEDBUGS  

   
Find the solution to your infestation.

      Bed Bug Control Products and Professional Control Solutions

 
 

 


Pest Control Canada.com

  Pest Solutions for Canadians
Page Index        
Advertising Information
 Ants,
Ant nest photos   
Ask the experts, 
Bats,
Bedbugs
Bees,
Bee Stings
Birds,
Booklouse
Box Elder Bugs
Bug Identification
Bushy Tailed Woodrat
Carpenter Ants,
Carpenter ant photos
Carpet Beetles
Canadian Pest Management Association
 

 

Canadian Pest Pros.
Centipedes
Choosing a pro,
Classified ads,
Clothes moths
Clover Mites
Cockroaches,
Controlling pests,
D
elusionary parasitosis
Employment ads
Finding a Pro
Fleas
Flies
 
Gnats
 
Phorid Flies
Flour Beetles
Get rid of :
    
Bedbugs
    
Carpenter Ants
    
Mice
Gnats

 

Grain beetles
Hantavirus,  
Health Hazards
Home page,
Index page
Indian Meal Moth
Insects,
I.P.M. ,
Ladybugs
Lice
Mice,
Millipedes
Mold
Mould
Moles,
Mosquitoes
Moths
News
Orchard bees
Organic pest solutions
Other pests,
Packrat
Pantry Pests
Pesticides
Pest health hazards
Pest pro Associations
 Alberta Assoc. 
 British Columbia
 Ontario
 Quebec
 Canada
 International

Pharaoh Ants
Phorid Flies
Pill Bugs
Powder post beetles,
Psocid
Questions and answers
Raccoons,
Rats
Real Estate & Pests,
Rodents,
Rodent clean up
Rodent diseases
 
Silverfish
Skunks

Snakes,
Sow Bugs
Spiders
SPMA of BC
Stored food pests
Supplies for pest control, 
Termites,
Ticks
Wasps
Wasp Stings
Wasp Traps
Weevils
West Nile Virus
What is this pest?
Wildlife pests 
Woodrat

 

 

 

Please report any errors or omissions to Webmanager   Your comments, suggestions, ideas are welcome. 
       Some errors on these pages may be intentional, to prove copyright infringement. 
Privacy policy   
Disclaimer notice
Copyright 2013 [Pest Control Canada]  All rights reserved.
Revised: 04/06/14

Web site by: P.C.S. (Pro-Com Solutions)